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The Flaneur: A Stroll Through the Paradoxes of Paris download epub

by Edmund White


Epub Book: 1493 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1910 kb.

A flaneur is a stroller, a loiterer, someone .

A flaneur is a stroller, a loiterer, someone who ambles through a city without apparent purpose but is secretly attuned to the history of the place and i. .The author, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, taking us into parts of Paris virtually unknown . Edmund White's The Flaneur is opinionated, personal, subjective.

Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, taking us into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. Entering the Marias evokes the history of Jews in France, just a visit to the Haynes grill recalls the presence - festive, troubled - of black Americans in Paris for a century and a half. Gays, Decadents, even Royalists past and present are all subjected to the flaneur's scrutiny.

With its chic, its luxe and its douceur de vivre, the city embodies everything which is censoriously excluded from their own utilitarian culture. Wilde himself, hounded out of puritanical England, expired in a down-at-heel hotel on the Left Bank, after fighting a duel to the death with.

Edmund White, who lived in Paris for 16 years, embraces this sobriquet and wanders through the streets and .

Edmund White, who lived in Paris for 16 years, embraces this sobriquet and wanders through the streets and avenues, along the quays, and into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. In the company of the learned White, a walk through Paris is both a tour of its lush, sometimes prurient, history and an evocation of the city's spirit. The Flaneur leads us to bookshops and boutiques, monuments and palaces, giving us a glimpse into their inner human drama

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Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians.

A Stroll Through the Paradoxes of Paris". This is the sub-title of Edmund White’s non-fiction work

The Flaneur sees both interaction and flux. A Stroll Through the Paradoxes of Paris". This is the sub-title of Edmund White’s non-fiction work. Outwardly, it presents itself as a guidebook to the culturally aware tourist. It starts tantalizingly

The Flaneur: A Stroll through the Paradoxes of Paris. The Flaneur - Edmund White.

The Flaneur: A Stroll through the Paradoxes of Paris. Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. In the hands of the learned White, a walk through Paris is both a tour of its lush, sometimes prurient history, and an evocation of the city's spirit.

Edmund White, who lived in Paris for 16 years, embraces this sobriquet and wanders through the streets and avenues . White explores the history, sociology, and psychology of Paris through the fearless lense of his own life

Edmund White, who lived in Paris for 16 years, embraces this sobriquet and wanders through the streets and avenues, along the quays, and into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. White explores the history, sociology, and psychology of Paris through the fearless lense of his own life. Erudite, funny, sanguine and honest, he restores the art of creative, free wandering to an age convulsed by consumption. For those who want their heart/mind to explore as deftly as their eye.

Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the streets and avenues and along the quays, into parts . The Flaneur leads us to bookshops and boutiques, monuments and palaces, giving us a glimpse the inner human drama. Along the way we learn everything from the latest debates among French lawmakers to the juicy details of Colette's life.

A flâneur is a stroller, a loiterer, someone who ambles without apparent purpose but is secretly attuned to the history of the streets he walks -. Here are some of the best books ever written about about Paris, according to authors in France. Glenn Pushelberg’s Book List The Flâneur: A Stroll through the Paradoxes of Paris by Edmund White. Discover ideas about Literary Travel. great little travel stroll though paris. Literary Travel Disney Beauty And The Beast Book Cover Design Book Design Bloomsbury.

A flaneur is a stroller, a loiterer, someone who ambles without apparent purpose but is secretly attuned to the history of the streets he walks - and is in covert search of adventure, aesthetic or erotic. Acclaimed writer Edmund White, who lived in Paris for sixteen years, wanders through the avenues and along the quays, into parts of the city virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many locals, luring the reader into the fascinating and seductive backstreets of his personal Paris.

Comments: (7)

Anarawield
In fact, not a guidebook at all. Perhaps best appreciated by Francophiles and fans of Paris after having visited the European capital and having formed their own opinions of the city and its residents. I like most of what I’ve read by author Edmund White (mostly essays, literary criticism and fiction), and even here I am not greatly disappointed. I’m giving it 4 stars rather than 5 because I felt the premise (a stroll through Paris) was not really fulfilled. That said, I enjoyed the bits on the careers of writer/entertainer Colette and African American jazz musician Sidney Bichet; and the description of the quirky and somewhat hidden museum of Gustav Moreau (I remember being the sole visitor at the museum when I was in Paris several years ago, spooky). White’s discussion of poet Charles Baudelaire’s dandyism was vivid and will likely influence all my future readings of that great poet’s works. And I found chapter five, in which White explores (and explains) the French attitudes toward (male) homosexuality, to be the clearest and most concise explanation anywhere of the French antipathy toward identity politics. On the minus side, I found the lack of proper footnotes and an index frustrating.
Llanonte
Absolutely love this book. I sort of bought it on accident, searching for another book with the similar title Le Flaneur. Ended up choosing this one. White discusses a walk through Paris with historical intricacies woven into it all. I don't know how to describe it. I've read it through and through multiple times and find myself catching something I didn't catch prior.
Rasmus
What do you do if you want to see the real Paris (not the guidebook city)? You flâner. The many parks and cafés of Paris (not to mention the Pont des Arts) help make this activity a pleasure.

Flâner. A French verb meaning to promenade, amble along, without objective, but merely for the pleasure of watching and observing. A man who is thus engaged is a flâneur; a woman, a flâneuse. That is how Edmund White (who lived in Paris >10 years) has seen Paris.

He fills this little book with gossipy, relatively-recent histories of famous artists/writers who inhabited or frequented the places he writes about―Manet, Proust, Collette, Baudelaire, to name a few. While the usual tourist attractions are interesting, the magic off Paris lies in the ghosts/memories of its streets along with the curious behavior of its residents and tourists. This is also how we see Paris, where we often stay for months. It is the only way to really know Paris.

White also relates how it was like to be gay in Paris, particularly during the AIDS crisis. I found this chapter poignant and eye-opening.
Kendis
"Paris is a big city, in the sense that London and New York are big cities and that Rome is a village, Los Angeles a collection of villages and Zurich a backwater."

Heh heh. I get what White means about Los Angeles being a collection of villages; a lot of West Coast cities (like Seattle) seem to be structured that way and you have to drive from "village" to "village." In any case, this was an amazing book.

From the jacket: A flaneur is a stroller, a loiterer, someone who ambles through city streets in search of adventure and fulfillment. Edmund White, who lived in Paris for 16 years, embraces this sobriquet and wanders through the streets and avenues, along the quays, and into parts of Paris virtually unknown to visitors and indeed to many Parisians. In the company of the learned White, a walk through Paris is both a tour of its lush, sometimes prurient, history and an evocation of the city's spirit. The Flaneur leads us to bookshops and boutiques, monuments and palaces, giving us a glimpse into their inner human drama. Along the way we learn everything from the latest debates among French lawmakers to the juicy details of Colette's life.

White manages to evoke the flaneur in his writing style very well; he wanders from subject to subject as a flaneur might wander from street to street. He had interesting facts to impart about the history of Paris. I quite enjoyed reading this book, especially as I'm interested in the concept of the flaneur. I really loved a lot of the narratives that White imparted to the reader.

*You can read all of my reviews at my book review blog, novareviews.blogspot.com*
DEAD-SHOT
This work about strolling around Paris was a wonderful read. Didn't want to put it down. It made me want to return to Paris and wander.
Mananara
Edmund White's writing is sumptuous and can be re-read for the mere pleasure of reading the words themselves irregardless of the content. He does, though, know his history of Paris and the great persons who lived there in the past.

The author "merely" wanders through Paris offering his reflections, but what reflections! He knows and loves Paris, its history, and its rich historical figures.

The writing style and intelligence of this book was so grand as to make me feel better about being a member of the human race. I've never read any form of writing with such a combination of intelligence, grace, wit, eloquence, and incisiveness. The book is like a work of art in the milieu of language.
Mr.Death
White explores the history, sociology, and psychology of Paris through the fearless lense of his own life. Erudite, funny, sanguine and honest, he restores the art of creative, free wandering to an age convulsed by consumption. For those who want their heart/mind to explore as deftly as their eye.
Edmund White has been around the block a few times but his observations remain priceless and are presented with such effortless panache that sort even a jaded veteran of15 years in a gay book club comes away from this experience speechless and wanting more and more. Standing ovation to a literary giant.
The Flaneur: A Stroll Through the Paradoxes of Paris download epub
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Author: Edmund White
ISBN: 0747596875
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (March 17, 2008)
Pages: 224 pages