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The Traveller's Tree: A Journey Through the Caribbean Islands (New York Review Books Classics) download epub

by Patrick Leigh Fermor


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For the 1950s Caribbean, Patrick Leigh Fermor’s The Traveller’s Tree was the bible. A very interesting and informative travel book about the islands of the Caribbean circa 1950, several of which were devastated by the 2017 hurricane

For the 1950s Caribbean, Patrick Leigh Fermor’s The Traveller’s Tree was the bible. Still the best piece of travel writing on the Caribbean. A very interesting and informative travel book about the islands of the Caribbean circa 1950, several of which were devastated by the 2017 hurricane.

The Traveller's Tree book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Traveller's Tree: A Journey Through the Caribbean Islands as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking The Traveller's Tree: A Journey Through the Caribbean Islands as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) was an intrepid traveler, a heroic soldier, and a writer with a unique prose style

Patrick Leigh Fermor. Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) was an intrepid traveler, a heroic soldier, and a writer with a unique prose style. After his stormy schooldays, followed by the walk across Europe to Constantinople that begins in A Time of Gifts (1977) and continues through Between the Woods and the Water (1986), he lived and traveled in the Balkans and the Greek Archipelago.

In this, his first book, Patrick Leigh Fermor recounts his tales of a personal odyssey to the lands of the Traveller's Tree - a tall, straight-trunked tree whose sheath-like leaves collect copious amounts of water. He made his way through the long island chain of the West Indies by steamer, aeroplane and sailing ship, noting in his records of the voyage the minute details of daily life, of the natural surroundings and of the idiosyncratic and distinct civilisations he encountered amongst the Caribbean Islands.

Additional Book Information. The Traveller's TreeA Journey Through the Caribbean Islands. Series: NYRB Classics ISBN: 9781590173800 Pages: 528 Publication Date: December 10, 2010. In the late 1940s Patrick Leigh Fermor, now widely regarded as one of the twentieth century’s greatest travel writers, set out to explore the then relatively little-visited islands of the Caribbean.

In the late 1940s Patrick Leigh Fermor, now widely regarded .

In the late 1940s Patrick Leigh Fermor, now widely regarded as one of the twentieth century’s greatest travel writers, set out to explore the then relatively little-visited islands of the Caribbean. Rather than a comprehensive political or historical study of the region, The Traveller’s Tree, Leigh Fermor’s first book, gives us his own vivid, idiosyncratic impressions of Guadeloupe, Martinique, Dominica, Barbados, Trinidad, and Haiti, among other islands.

Before he was a writer, Patrick Leigh Fermor was merely a war hero, having earned his first fame from deep-cover exploits . But unlike those volumes, The Traveller’s Tree, which skips along the Antillean island chain from Trinidad to Cuba, was written within only a year or two of the trip it records.

Before he was a writer, Patrick Leigh Fermor was merely a war hero, having earned his first fame from deep-cover exploits with the Greek Resistance.

The traveller's tree. a journey through the Caribbean Islands. by Patrick Leigh Fermor.

Patrick Leigh Fermor.

So many books, so little time. Quality Management for the Technology Sector. 33 MB·19,074 Downloads·New! to wade through reams of reference materials and international standards verbiage.

In the late 1940s Patrick Leigh Fermor, now widely regarded as one of the twentieth century’s greatest travel writers, set out to explore the then relatively little-visited islands of the Caribbean. Rather than a comprehensive political or historical study of the region, The Traveller’s Tree, Leigh Fermor’s first book, gives us his own vivid, idiosyncratic impressions of Guadeloupe, Martinique, Dominica, Barbados, Trinidad, and Haiti, among other islands. Here we watch Leigh Fermor walk the dusty roads of the countryside and the broad avenues of former colonial capitals, equally at home among the peasant and the elite, the laborer and the artist. He listens to steel drum bands, delights in the Congo dancing that closes out Havana’s Carnival, and observes vodou and Rastafarian rites, all with the generous curiosity and easy erudition that readers will recognize from his subsequent classic accounts A Time of Gifts and Between the Woods and the Water.

Comments: (7)

Mr Freeman
A very interesting and informative travel book about the islands of the Caribbean circa 1950, several of which were devastated by the 2017 hurricane. My advice is buy the book but don't plan to visit the Caribbean anytime soon. You'll have a much happier experience as an armchair traveler right now.
Connorise
Paddy Fermor is an absolutely sui-generis person and writer. This post-war account of his travels through the Caribbean isles comes on the heels of his service with the SOE behind enemy lines in Greece and Crete where he, amongst other things, was the only agent - of whom I am aware - to capture a Nazi General single-handedly, in occupied Greece. And yet, he is anything but smug or bluff, but rather singularly self-effacing in all his writing, falling in love, or yearning to do so, with everyone and, more significantly here, every place where he sojourns and giving the people and the place centre-stage. Also, he refrains from even a hint of talking down to the reader and gives him/her conversations in the French Créole patois as he hears them, and weaves his erudition into the lush writing in a manner which involves the reader with a particular island's lore and history in a mesmerising, rather than off-putting manner. The detailed history which Fermor gives of each island is always fascinating and well-told, and helps to put the sights, sounds, smells he encounters into a deeper context, lending the reader his own deep sense of atavism such as one usually only encounters in works of great literature, such as the best of Conrad and Powys.

It is quite beyond the scope of a review such as this one to attempt to impart Fermor's experience on each of the islands, or to compare or to contrast them. There is this book for that! It is even beyond the scope of this reviewer to delve the into Fermor's impressionistic, Romantic mindset, for Fermor does it much better himself describing Martinique:

"We rose to leave when the rain abated, and found that the moon had broken through the clouds. The garden was a faint constellation of flowers that were only distinguishable by their pallor from the darkness. Under the dripping mango trees, tier on tier of lawn descended into the darkness. The air was warm and scented, and the forest, faintly rimmed with silver, completely surrounded this high, sloping world. The singing of some Negro women floated up from the village with the echo of the falling waves and the faint gasp of the shingle.

Moments like this fill one with gratitude; not necessarily so much because of their incidental beauty, but because of the understanding they bring; they act as a Rosetta stone to a whole system of hieroglyphs. That house, those lights and voices and flowers and smells and sounds, I felt, gave me a better chance of grasping the atmosphere, the scope and mood of Créole life in the Antilles than a library full of memoirs and chronicles."

Not to the exclusion of memoirs and chronicles, to be sure, but the reader must surely succumb to the poetic nuances of Fermor's prose to grasp this enchanted Rosetta stone and develop a sixth sense as to places and people in the reading of this unique labour of love.
Jode
In this delightful tome, Patrick Leigh Fermor takes us to a number of Caribbean islands in the post-war, pre-tourism era; and in so doing he burnishes his reputation as perhaps the best travel writer of modern times. To his credit, Fermor does not attempt to hit all the islands in the Caribbean -- only a handful -- but in that handful he dishes out detail and cultural gems of a Caribbean that no longer exists. There are few cruise ships and opulent hotels in Fermor's Caribbean. Rather, there are societies that have been shaped by geography, the invasion of European settlers in the Age of Exploration and, perhaps most of all, the bitter disaster of centuries of slavery. Fermor delves into these influences with great gusto and incredible detail. Of particular note are his several chapters on Haiti, which focus mainly on Voodooism, which so defines the turbulent history of the country. His description of the many facets of that mysterious belief system are definitive. In his first books, "A Time of Gifts" and "Between the Woods and the Water", Fermor, walking from The Netherlands to Istanbul, described in chilling detail a Europe about to be smashed by World War II. In "The Traveller's Tree" he gives us a region about to be forever altered by tourism. It's a book rich in detail and wonder -- testament to this legendary travel writer's skill.
Jarortr
This is a superb travel essay book. It deals with the undeveloped Caribbean just after WW II. Leigh Fermor's prose i strikingly evocative..
Zacki
Sadly Mr. Fermor has passed on at age 92 but the quality of his observation then skill in writing is amazing. I have read all of his work published to date. This book is the most thorough I have ever seen on Caribbean culture and even though written in 1947 it provides the real background to what is happening there today. A delight to read - never boring and his other works are equally edifying. Be sure to make notes of the words you don't know the meaning of - you will be amazed at his word choices once you look them up! Great teacher.
Manris
WHAT A GEM OF A RETRO TRAVEL BOOK. WILDLY POLITICALLY INCORRECT IN PLACES = WRITTEN IN ANOTHER ERA. ARMCHAIR TRAVEL THE WEST INDIES OF THE CARIBBEAN THE WAY THEY WERE BEFORE TOURISM.
Kulalbine
I would describe this as a weighty tome, but maybe darned good read fits better, describes West Indies 25 years before I lived there.
The companion book to "Live and Let Die". M of Q branch gave it to Bond so that he could study up on Voodoo while in the islands.
The Traveller's Tree: A Journey Through the Caribbean Islands (New York Review Books Classics) download epub
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Author: Patrick Leigh Fermor
ISBN: 1590173805
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language: English
Publisher: NYRB Classics; Reprint edition (January 11, 2011)
Pages: 432 pages