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How to Write a Book Proposal download epub

by Michael Larsen


Epub Book: 1573 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1359 kb.

Michael Larsen co-founded Michael Larsen-Elizabeth Pomada Literary Agents, in 1972. Michael Larsen covers every single question you might have about writing a non-fiction book proposal

Michael Larsen co-founded Michael Larsen-Elizabeth Pomada Literary Agents, in 1972. He is a member of AAR. Mike is also the author of How to Get a Literary Agent, and with Jay Conrad Levinson and Rick Frishman, coauthor of Guerrilla Marketing for Writers. Series: How to Write a Book Proposal. Michael Larsen covers every single question you might have about writing a non-fiction book proposal. His writing is thorough and straight to the point and yet humorous and light. His direction and guidance show you how-to prepare the proposal as well as giving you the encouragement which you will need to overcome obstacles along the way.

Either this book was written by someone who knows nothing about writing a book proposal or he is writing about completely .

Either this book was written by someone who knows nothing about writing a book proposal or he is writing about completely different proposals than what I am looking for and therefore should make it more clear what types he's writing about.

The Source for Book Proposals Success! .

The Source for Book Proposals Success! How to Write a Book Proposal is THE resource for getting your work published.

The book proposal is a 15-50 (or so) page manuscript that a writer uses to pitch a nonfiction book to publishers. Jody Rein and Michael Larsen in How to Write a Book Proposal bring up the story of aspiring author Trisha Pritikin, who was finding it tough to build a brand

The book proposal is a 15-50 (or so) page manuscript that a writer uses to pitch a nonfiction book to publishers. Though it’s written in place of an actual book, it should build a complete argument for the book idea. Jody Rein and Michael Larsen in How to Write a Book Proposal bring up the story of aspiring author Trisha Pritikin, who was finding it tough to build a brand. This brought nation-wide publicity and eventually got a reputable publisher to knock on Trisha’s door. 5. Competitive titles.

THE ESSENTIAL RESOURCE FOR SELLING YOUR BOOK If you want to publish a book, you must present it to agents .

THE ESSENTIAL RESOURCE FOR SELLING YOUR BOOK If you want to publish a book, you must present it to agents and publishers with a proposal. Whether you're seeking a traditional press to publish your self-published book or trying to win over an agent for your graphic novel, memoir, or nonfiction title, you need an irresistible proposal.

Book proposals are used to sell nonfiction books to publishers. A book proposal argues why your book (idea) is a salable, marketable product. It acts as a business case or business plan for your book that persuades a publisher to make an investment. For professors and academics, I recommend taking a look at The Professor Is In. Looking for more help?

The Source for Book Proposals Success!How to Write a Book Proposal is THE resource for getting your work published. The one thing a book on this subject must have, above all else, is brevity.

The Source for Book Proposals Success!How to Write a Book Proposal is THE resource for getting your work published. Michael Larsen's suitably thin volume has this and many other qualities, making it a very useful tool for the writer who seriously wishes to publish. I can't say whether it actually works or not, as I have not yet sent off a proposal based on this work. You'll also find complete guidelines to becoming an effective self-promoter. How to Write a Book Proposal is a must-have for every writer!

The Source for Book Proposals Success! How to Write a Book Proposal is THE resource for getting your work published  .

Writer's Digest Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Written by a literary agent who has successfully placed writers' manuscripts with more than 100 publishers, this newly revised book takes you through every step of writing a nonfiction book proposal: test your idea's market potential and effectively relate that idea in your proposal, prepare an introduction that conveys your book's purpose and audience, as it compels the editor to read on, pick the best editors and publishers to pitch your proposal to, create a professional-looking proposal package, and predispose publishers to make you their best offer. You'll also find three complete sample proposals to use as guides, complete self-promotion strategies and a wealth of insider tips that will put your proposal ahead of the competition.

Comments: (7)

Runeshaper
When I started to read this book I was appalled at how much work Larsen suggests one puts into the book proposal, 50,000 words, 30 pages, one line per page of manuscript! It's almost more work than writing the book itself! But after thinking about it as an entrepreneur and product development professional, I realize that HE'S RIGHT! It's very important to separate the product (the book itself) from its marketing. The book proposal is the product definition and marketing plan, analogous to a business plan for your book.
Larsen gives excellent examples for every single thing that he suggests, and he uses famous examples that you either already know or can look up. He tells enough about himself and his own experiences for credibility.
I'm STUDYING this book with yellow highlighter and a notebook, and notes in the margins, using 'stickies' to mark pages with examples that I will refer to when I start to write the proposal.
Very good book.
Zainn
You know that you are reading a good book when you are laughing out loud as you read it and you can't put it down. You know that the book is truly good when you find yourself planning your activities around reading it and sneaking in pages when you are supposed to be working. And finally, you know you have found a true gem when, after finishing the book, you smile knowingly to yourself, full of ideas, and say to yourself, 'I can do this'. One would never think that non-fiction could have that effect.
Michael Larsen's How to Write a Book Proposal is that kind of book. Mr. Larsen goes beyond mere information to give the aspiring new writer inspiration. Beginners and seasoned professionals will find very useful material in the book. Written in an active, easy-going, can-do style, Larsen's positive outlook and infinite love of the book really comes through. The reader will learn in quick, readily understandable succession, what goes into a book proposal, how to capture and sustain an agent's and editor's interest interest from the first word, and how to market and promote one's book for maximum profit. Useful advice on book proposal writing (advice that works) is presented throughout the book, as well as samples of various book proposals to show you exactly how to write the book proposal that sells.
This is, without a doubt, a must-have reference for any writer.
Joni_Dep
The email was from the publisher. She liked the chapter that I had written and wanted to know if I had anything else to be published. I gave her a call.
"I'm working on a book about emotional intelligence and leadership and martial arts," I said.
"Great! Just send me the proposal and we'll look at it." she said.
"Uh.........not wanting to show my ignorance, but whatis a 'proposal'?" I asked.
"A proposal is...." she began.
Having actually had, much to my embarassment, this conversation with a publisher, I wanted to make sure I wrote a great proposal. I read a number of books on proposal writing, and I found this one to be the most helpful for me. The author walks through each section of the proposal and gives concrete examples.
Well worth the price for beginning writers.
Xaluenk
To those seeking guidance with writing a book proposal to obtain a literary agent's services or to obtain a contract from a publisher, I strongly recommend both this book and Write the Perfect Book Proposal co-authored by Jeff and Deborah Levine Herman as well as Strunk & White's The Elements of Style. True, there is some duplication of advice in the Larsen and Herman books which convinced me that the advice is sound. Given the importance and -- yes -- the difficulty of writing a book proposal, and given the competition to obtain a literary agent and then a publisher, the investment in all three books is indeed a small price to pay. Larsen organizes his excellent material as follows:
Part One Selling the Sizzle: The Introduction
Larsen explains how to get paid to write your book; how to devise the most effect "subject hook" and "book hook"; how to avoid technical and legal problems; which back matter to consider for inclusion; how to determine a book's markets; which subsidiary rights and spin-offs to consider; what a promotion plan involves; how to select and present competitive and complementary books; which resources may be needed; and how to formulate an author's biography
Part Two Baring the Bones and Sampling the Steak
Larsen explains what the the proposal outline should include; explains why verbs and structure are the two "keys" to the proposal outline; offers "quick fixes for six kinds of books"; and includes sample chapters, followed by a Q&A section on what to submit
Part Three: Getting Your Proposal to Market
He explains how to assemble the proposal components; how to make the proposal stand out; identifies three ways to test-market the idea for the book; and explains how to sell the proposal fast and do so with the best terms and conditions
Larsen then provides two appendices: one explains how to research competitive books; the other provides three sample proposals. Throughout his narrative, he includes a number of "Hot Tips" which deserve special attention. In fact, all of the advice which he offers should be carefully considered. Wisely, Larsen assumes that his reader knows little (if anything) about the process by which to prepare a book proposal. He patiently and thoroughly guides the reader through that process. Perhaps others will have the same reaction I did when reading Larsen's book as well as the Hermans' book: That it was written expressly for me, that Larsen had anticipated all of the questions I needed answered (and then carefully answered them for me), and that -- meanwhile -- he was disabusing me of whatever misconceptions I may have had about the process by which to obtain the services of a literary agent and/or secure a publishing contract. Both books cover much of the same ground and do so with meticulous care. However, there are differences (albeit mostly subtle) in how Larsen and the Hermans present their ideas. As already indicated, I had no problem with duplications because, first, they reassured me that the advice is sound, and second, repetition increases the impact of what they agree are key points.
For me, some of Larsen's most valuable advice to aspiring authors is provided in Chapter Eleven, "Getting the Words Write: A Style Guide for Your Proposal." (The same advice will be of great value to others who also need to write more effectively.) For example: "Avoid weak verbs. Use can for could; will for would, might, or should; is for seems to be. Readers want to be informed by an authority, so write like one! The more forceful your statement the better, particularly in the overview, when you're trying to sell your idea and yourself to an editor. Don't pussyfoot around. Be accurate, but be bold." Larsen's own crisp and lucid writing is the most convincing evidence of how sound his "Style Guide" is.
I strongly recommend that readers of this book visit Larsen's Web site which offers a wealth of valuable information, such as "A Mission Statement" and "The Author's Platform." And as indicated previously, given the importance of an effective book proposal and the difficulty of what the preparation of one involves, I also strongly recommend that this book be consulted in combination with both the Hermans' Write the Perfect Book Proposal and Strunk & White's The Elements of Style.
Antuiserum
I bought this book to help me write a book proposal, along with a few other books, including one by Patricia Fry.

I have to say, Patricia Fry's book, "The Right Way to Write, Publish and Sell Your Book" was better, all-around, in helping write your proposal and also sell your book to publishers.

This book needs an update. But the information was good.
Ffel
great book and in very good condition with oodles of valuable information, I wrote my book and this book will help me take it to the next level.
How to Write a Book Proposal download epub
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Author: Michael Larsen
ISBN: 0898797713
Category: Reference
Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Language: English
Publisher: Writers Digest Books; 2 edition (September 15, 1997)
Pages: 224 pages