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Don't-Know Mind: The Spirit of Korean Zen download epub

by Richard Shrobe


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Reading Richard Shrobe's Don't-Know Mind is like drinking a glass of cold water when you are thirsty.

Reading Richard Shrobe's Don't-Know Mind is like drinking a glass of cold water when you are thirsty. Clean, clear, and bright like the author himself, it brings fresh life to the teachings of Korean Zen. If you have ever grappled with how to bring the essence of traditional Zen into your everyday life, this is the book for yo. -Jane Dobisz, author of The Wisdom of Solitude: A Zen Retreat in the Woods. Wonderful! Wonderful!

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Don't-Know Mind book.

Publisher: - ISBN 13: 9781590301104. Shrobe does a fine job of unpacking stories and words for meaning without getting lost in the conceptualization that Zen debunks. Title: Don't-Know Mind : The Spirit of Korean Zen Item Condition: New. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. Books will be free of page markings. Показать все 3 объявления с новыми товарами.

Wu Kwang Soen Sa Nim (1950–present), born Richard Shrobe, is head Zen teacher at Chogye International Zen Center of New York, a. .Don't Know Mind: the Spirit of Korean Zen, Boston: Shambhala Publications, 2004.

Wu Kwang Soen Sa Nim (1950–present), born Richard Shrobe, is head Zen teacher at Chogye International Zen Center of New York, a practice center of the Kwan Um School of Zen. Before coming to Zen practice Richard studied Hinduism under Swami Satchidananda. He is a social worker who incorporates Gestalt therapy in his counseling. In 1975 Wu Kwang began his Zen practice and received Dharma transmission from Seung Sahn in 1993. He is also a jazz musician. Elegant Failure: A Guide to Zen Koans," Berkeley, CA: Rodmell Press, 2010.

Don’t-know Mind: The Spirit Of Korean Ze.

Don’t-know Mind: The Spirit Of Korean Zen. "Don't-know mind" is our enlightened mind before ideas, opinions, or concepts arise to create suffering. In Elegant Failure, he provides a wealth of background information and personal anecdotes for each koan that help to illuminate its meaning without detracting from its paradoxical nature.

9781590301104 "Don't-know mind" is our enlightened mind before ideas, opinions, or concepts arise to create suffering

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. 9781590301104 "Don't-know mind" is our enlightened mind before ideas, opinions, or concepts arise to create suffering. Practicing with don't-know mind has long been a central concern of Korean Zen. Here, an American Zen master in the Korean lineage brings the teaching to life by using stories about the Chinese and Korean Zen masters as jumping-off points for his own teaching.

Don't-know mind" is our enlightened mind before ideas, opinions, or concepts arise to create suffering. Don't-Know Mind is a clear, direct, and heartfelt presentation of Zen teaching applicable to anyone, both for formal practice and for all the rest of life.

His books include Don't-Know Mind: The Spirit of Korean Zen (Shambhala, 2004) . Wu Kwang (born Richard Shrobe) is a Korean Zen teacher in the Kwan Um School of Zen, a dharma heir of the late Zen master Seung Sahn.

His books include Don't-Know Mind: The Spirit of Korean Zen (Shambhala, 2004), Open Mouth Already a Mistake (Primary Point Press, 1997), and his latest, Elegant Failure: A Guide to Zen Koans (Rodmell Press, 2010). He currently serves as Guiding teacher of the Chogye International Zen Center of New York and at Three Treasures Zen Center of Oneonta.

Sometimes we think we don’t understand because we just haven’t read the right book yet.

Don’t-know mind: The Spirit of Korean Zen. Boston: Shambhala Publications, Inc. Photo by Arūnas Kulikauskas problems. It will let me understand what I really need. But Buddha didn’t do that.

"Don't-know mind" is our enlightened mind before ideas, opinions, or concepts arise to create suffering. Practicing with don't-know mind has long been a central concern of Korean Zen. Here, an American Zen master in the Korean lineage brings the teaching to life by using stories about the Chinese and Korean Zen masters as jumping-off points for his own teaching. Don't-Know Mind is a clear, direct, and heartfelt presentation of Zen teaching applicable to anyone, both for formal practice and for all the rest of life.

Comments: (7)

Winasana
Excellent Book. I've been reading a countless number of these types of contemporary Buddhist books over the last year or so and this is one of the best, just in terms of being clear, grounded, practical and explaining some of the more absolute statements made in Buddhist philosophy and translating them in a way that makes the ideas not only more understandable, but more feasible to use as a way to live in a realistic way for modern life. I just happened to be at a meditation retreat (only my second one) and he was running it. I didn't know who he was. But I was immediately struck by the great clarity with which he spoke. So I went out and bought three of his books and really have found them to be super clear and super helpful. I think the fact that he's also a therapist and enjoys playing jazz music in some way perhaps helps him translate for a more contemporary crowd. Not that he references the therapy and jazz (maybe a little being a therapist), but reading his bio made me think those activities probably help him with the contemporary clarity.
Sat
I don't know about the last review [since deleted] -- I know what s/he intends to mean, but to a beginner s/he maybe makes it sound like this is a practice about blindly following a kind of cult leader. "Close your eyes; don't look behind the curtain, this teaching is above your judgment." Maybe not so helpful.

As a teacher in a slightly different lineage of Korean Zen, I'm very happy to recommend this book to new practitioners in search of a clear, concise introduction. Although, of course, the cushion and your own life are best, if you feel you need a book, I'd also recommend Richard Shrobe's first one (written as Zen Master Wu Kwang), "Open Mouth Already A Mistake," which I must admit to happily avoiding for years because I took its title to heart.

Ultimately because no good, no bad, "Don't Know Mind" is a damn good little book.
Coiriel
Had high hopes for this book, but found it a convoluted and complex bunch of words. YouTube seems to be a more useful source for the topic "Don't know mind." I threw it away.
Todal
According to Hui-neng, "In this teaching of seated meditation, one fundamentally does not concentrate on mind, nor does one concentrate on purity, nor is it motionlessness. If one is to concentrate on the mind, then the mind [involved] is fundamentally false. You should understand that the mind is like a phantasm, so nothing can concentrate on it. If one is to concentrate on purity, then [realize that because] our natures are fundamentally pure, it is through false thoughts that suchness is covered up. Just be without false thoughts and the nature is pure of itself. If you activate your mind to become attached to purity, you will only generate the falseness of purity. The false is without location; it is the concentration that is false. Purity is without shape and characteristics; you only create the characteristics of purity and say this is ‘effort’ [in meditation]. To have such a view is to obscure one’s own fundamental nature, and only to be fettered by purity."

Mazu Daoyi said, "A monk asked, “Master, why do you say that mind is Buddha?”
Mazu said, “To stop babies from crying.”
The monk said, “What do you say when they stop crying?”
Mazu said, “No mind, no Buddha.”
The monk asked, “Without using either of these teachings, how would you instruct someone?”
Mazu said, “I would say to him that it’s not a thing.”
The monk asked, “If suddenly someone who was in the midst of it came to you, then what would you do?”
Mazu said, “I would teach him to experience the great way.”
Quendant
Zen Master Wu Kwang (Richard Shrobe) does a nice job of unzipping Korean Zen in general, and some of the nuances of Zen practice in particular (no pun intended). His stories of the Kwan Um School's ancestors are narrated well and maintain a lively, non-intellectual stance that serves the material well and makes for fun reading. This is not a technical how-to meditate manual, but strives to explain the inexplicable without sinking into an attachment to words and fonts.

Nice addition to any Zen library.
Marelyne
My copy of this book is lined, dog-eared and very well read. Richard is a fine writer, humble, knowledgeable. Each reading of Don't Know Mind leaves me feeling hopeful and inspired.
Silverbrew
Whether you practice zen meditation or not, this book offers a fresh and illuminating look on the somewhat mysterious practice of zen kongans, different from the customary heavyly-academic overly-intellectual 'white man' analysis .
When reading this book, just read it! Do not make good and bad judgement about its teaching. It's always direct, clear and complete! I just bow to Zen Master Wu Kuang!
Don't-Know Mind: The Spirit of Korean Zen download epub
Buddhism
Author: Richard Shrobe
ISBN: 1590301102
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Subcategory: Buddhism
Language: English
Publisher: Shambhala (May 11, 2004)
Pages: 176 pages