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Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom download epub

by Dzogchen Ponlop


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Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche shatters old myths and sweeps away cultural baggage, presenting the essence of the Buddha’s teachings in a fresh, contemporary voice

Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche shatters old myths and sweeps away cultural baggage, presenting the essence of the Buddha’s teachings in a fresh, contemporary voice. With uncommon clarity and authority, he offers a new vision for the future of Buddhism that is at once shocking and hopeful. This is a small book with a big message that is timely and important. Pema Chödrön, author of When Things Fall Apart

Автор: Ponlop Dzogchen Название: Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom Издательство: Random House . Dzogchen Ponlop guides you through the inner revolution that comes from unleashing your rebel buddha.

Dzogchen Ponlop guides you through the inner revolution that comes from unleashing your rebel buddha. He explains how, by training your mind and understanding your true nature, you can free yourself from needless suffering.

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Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is a leading Buddhist teacher in North America and an advocate of American and Western Buddhism. Rinpoche is author of several books, most recently, Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom

Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche is a leading Buddhist teacher in North America and an advocate of American and Western Buddhism. A lover of music, art and urban culture, Rinpoche is a poet, an avid photographer, an accomplished calligrapher and visual artist. Rinpoche is author of several books, most recently, Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom. He is a frequent contributor to Buddhadharma: A Practitioner's Quarterly and the Shambhala Sun. Rinpoche is active on Twitter and in the blogosphere, where you can find his posts on blogs such as Huffington Post, Intent. com, Elephant Journal, Shambhala Sunspace, and others. He explains how, by training your mind and understanding your true nature, you can free yourself from needless suffering

Dzogchen Ponlop guides you through the inner revolution that comes from unleashing your rebel buddha. He presents a thorough introduction to the essence of the Buddha’s teachings and argues that, if we are to bring these teachings fully into our personal experience, we must go beyond the cultural trappings of traditional Asian Buddhism. We all want to find some meaningful truth about who we are," he says, "but we can only find it guided by our own wisdom-by.

Dzogchen Ponlop presents traditional Buddhist philosophy and practice for Generations X and Y in this refreshing new take on Buddhism for modern times. Each of us has an inner rebel, he teaches, and that rebel represents our innate wisdom. The inner rebel is the voice inside that tells us we don't have to conform to the materialistic status quo. If we listen to that voice, we discover the courage to pursue a genuine spiritual life.

Named after the book, Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom by Dzogchen Ponlop, this page and RebelBuddha. com are administered by the students of Dzogchen Ponlop (Rinpoche). Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom by Dzogchen Ponlop.

Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche’s Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom is the latest attempt to present Buddhism to Western audiences in its most essential and naked form, a culturally strippeddown vision of the Buddhist spiritual journey, as Ponlop puts it. The book combines tw. . The book combines two lecture series he gave on Buddhism and culture-one in Boulder in 1999, and another in Seattle in 2008.

There’s a rebel within you. It’s the part of you that already knows how to break free of fear and unhappiness. This rebel is the voice of your own awakened mind. It’s your rebel buddha—the sharp, clear intelligence that resists the status quo. It wakes you up from the sleepy acceptance of your day-to-day reality and shows you the power of your enlightened nature. It’s the vibrant, insightful energy that compels you to seek the truth. Dzogchen Ponlop guides you through the inner revolution that comes from unleashing your rebel buddha. He explains how, by training your mind and understanding your true nature, you can free yourself from needless suffering. He presents a thorough introduction to the essence of the Buddha’s teachings and argues that, if we are to bring these teachings fully into our personal experience, we must go beyond the cultural trappings of traditional Asian Buddhism. “We all want to find some meaningful truth about who we are,” he says, “but we can only find it guided by our own wisdom—by our own rebel buddha within.” <iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/sV8pwAmNI_c" width="640" frameborder="0" height="390"> </iframe>

Comments: (7)

Bumand
Okay, so, I enjoyed this book. I did. But I thought I was going to enjoy this book a lot more than I actually did. The good: it's a Buddhism book directed towards Americans, written in a very easy way to understand by someone who never heard of Buddhism. The ideas are good ideas all passed down from the Buddha; mindfulness, compassion, and the like. Plus, I like the way the author writes. It's laid back and still intelligent. His comparisons are sound. I especially liked the stories about his past, being born into this Buddhist lifestyle. The bad: If you're even kind of familiar with Buddhism, I think it is kind of repetitive to read. After awhile, I grew sick of the word "mindfulness". It just kept being repeated, and I am so familiar with the "Healthy Living" section of every magazine where they prescribe meditation and "mindfulness" and I've read many Buddhism articles and books; so it really did irk me after being bashed in the head with it so many times. It got too "self-help"-y sometimes. If you don't mind that, or you're new to Buddhism, you will definitely learn a thing or two and you'll enjoy it a lot. If not, I'd advise you to skip this one.
Gldasiy
Very easy to read and clear book about removing the culture from the true essence of the teachings. I believe this is a very essential book for Western Buddhism moving forwardd also gives some refreshing views on the path in general. For example, I really liked how he described the guru how Gautama had described it: a spiritual friend.
Was definitely I in mroe detail and specifics about what this looks like and how he envisions vajryana Buddhism in the west taking shape moving forward.
Cerekelv
As has been true with each book I've read by Ponlop Rinpoche, "Rebel Buddha" adds enormously to my knowledge of Buddhism. I always welcome his understanding of American Culture and how far he has come to bridge the "gap" between Tibet and America in his writings on Buddhism. (Even to the point that he watches Stephen Colbert!).

I always find a great deal of encouragement from his writings for my practice; that I can advance, that awakening may not be millions of lifetimes in the future but, in fact, could be at any time with deepening practice of the six perfections.

Rinpoche's approach is casual, light-hearted and joyful, but, nevertheless conveys the immense importance of undertaking the Path. I've never met him, but through his writings, I've come to regard him as a great spiritual friend.

~~Rich
Malann
Rebel Buddha is a refreshing Buddhist primer, a recapitulation of core ideas stripped of some of the most common Asian cultural accretions. "If we are to understand who we are as individuals and societies," Ponlop says, "then we need to see the interdependence of culture, identity and meaning." His version of Buddhism for Americans is much like what we have been reading for the past decade from authors such as Stephen Batchelor, a commitment to personal transformation through personal introspection, a Buddhism grounded in practice, skepticism and secularism. The book is refreshingly free of Buddhist jargon and makes an interesting read for old-timers if for no other reason than to see how Buddhist ideas can be expressed in ways that might be more appealing to a modern, non-religious audience. It's also mostly free of metaphysical ideas - not a peep about karma, reincarnation, devas, hell-beings, or bodhisattvas. Other assumptions are left untouched. Is the idea of an ultimate reality, for example, a rusty legacy of the Iron Age? If the Buddha's truth is universal, why has it emerged in original form (and not as an adaptation) in no other time and place? As Ponlop describes himself as someone on the path, as someone not yet fully liberated, is he doing nothing more than passing on second-hand claims of an ultimate enlightenment, like a Christian clergyman promising heaven, "realities" neither has experienced? One clever adaptation to American culture is the book title, really nothing more than a gimmick, a bit of good-old American misdirection, associating compassion and wisdom with individualism and resistance to cultural norms.

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QUOTABLE

"Real wisdom is when you find a true question."p23

"Sometimes going to an extreme is the only way to trigger a revolution of mind." p177

"..if we can't appreciate our own neurosis, then there's no way to appreciate the world, which is full of neurotic people. Like it or not, that is our world." p99

"One of the greatest contributions we can make to our world is to learn how to live in harmony with each other." p172

"If there's any way we can really save someone, being genuine and kind is probably the only way." p103

"Look at your mind when you wake up in the morning and discover that there's no milk for your coffee, it's raining again, the car needs gas, and your kids have the headphones on and are refusing to speak to you. In that moment, where is your equanimity, your compassion? If you need reminders that will urge you toward practice, you can easily find them in your own life." p110

"The spiritual friend [the teacher] is a person with whom you can have a relationship as a friend rather than an authority figure, boss, or CEO of your organization. We need to understand this, because frankly we're missing this element today in many of our Tibetan Buddhist organizations." p117

"...when we think of the Buddha, we imagine a saintly figure giving out profound teachings. We don't see an Indian man walking dusty paths from village to village; getting hungry, tired and sore; sometimes smiling and sometimes scowling. Do we think he was meditating all the time? Do we think he never shouted at anyone? He was a human being, just like us, and he can be a wonderful model for us precisely because of that." p158

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Inabel
My husband and I read this together. We both felt like it was a great dharma book. It is a contemporary approach to traditional Tibetan Buddhism. Ponlop Rinpoche is very wise and has a good sense of humor. It is a great beginning dharma book, a good gift for those who are curious and I would definitely recommend it.
Jonide
I'm new to Buddhism, and I found the book to be somewhat informative on the topic. It mostly provides a Western point of view on Buddhism. What I mean by that is, the traditional aspects were not included in the explanation. It's a bare bones description on how to get started with meditating, what to expect when you go further down the path, and what to look for in a spiritual "friend" (teacher).
Golden freddi
An interesting book. Funny and easy to understand writing.
Read this book after it was recommended to me. This author leads the reader through the basics of Buddism and allows an understanding that is so simple, pure and inviting.
Recommend to anyone who wants to enjoy learning the basics!!!
Rebel Buddha: On the Road to Freedom download epub
Buddhism
Author: Dzogchen Ponlop
ISBN: 1590308743
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Subcategory: Buddhism
Language: English
Publisher: Shambhala; 1 edition (November 9, 2010)
Pages: 224 pages