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Mahabharata download epub

by Kamala Subramaniam


Epub Book: 1715 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1422 kb.

When I go through Kamala Subramaniam's work now, I'm a little more critical of it than I was as a young person. I find her work a little flowery.

She has devoted the best part of her life in translating the best of Hindu scriptures. When I go through Kamala Subramaniam's work now, I'm a little more critical of it than I was as a young person. Of course Sanskrit is flowery, so that will come through in translations.

See if your friends have read any of Kamala Subramaniam's books. Kamala Subramaniam’s Followers (18). Kamala Subramaniam’s books.

More details: This book on the Mahabharata starts with the meeting of Ganga and Santanu, and their subsequent marriage, and the birth of their children

More details: This book on the Mahabharata starts with the meeting of Ganga and Santanu, and their subsequent marriage, and the birth of their children. When Santanu asks Ganga the reason for drowning the children born to her, she takes the eighth child and disappears from his life. The author has captured with dramatic intensity the movement of the story of the epic Mahabharata. The narrative is vivid, and is a priceless legacy for the young and the old. The story of the Pandavas and the Kauravas and the Mahabharata war has been retold in a superb manner.

Mahabharata Kamala Subramaniam. 07340 1Contents - Free download as PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or read online for free. Mahabharata Kamala Subramaniam. Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd

Mahabharata Kamala Subramaniam. Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd. Flag for inappropriate content. saveSave Mahabharata Kamala Subramaniam. 07340 1Contents For Later.

Foreword MOSA purchased the Mahabharata collection by Jananjana Dasa before it miraculously found its way to the ground floor of the main building of Villa Vrindavan, where it is now permanently housed

Foreword MOSA purchased the Mahabharata collection by Jananjana Dasa before it miraculously found its way to the ground floor of the main building of Villa Vrindavan, where it is now permanently housed. The works seem to have been made for the walls of the renovated villa, without anyone having been conscious of how this match would take place. Maybe providence played a role. The whole collection perfectly fits in the spacious ground-floor rooms. Your Cart (0). in All Categories in Textiles in Jewelry in Sculptures in Books in Paintings in CDs & DVDs in Beauty & Health Care in Beads in Articles.

Which is the best Mahabharata book to read? For this vast epic with mammoth popularity followed by overwhelming reading choices, this is an often asked question. Hence, here is a compilation of various handpicked titles from seven different genres or categories. Enjoy the list & take your pick! A handpicked list of Best Books on Mahabharata. Mahabharata Books & the Problem of Plenty. There is no Indian individual who’d hear the word Mahabharata for the first time.

Mahabharata (by Subramaniam). translated by Kamala Subramaniam. Our most popular translation of the Ramayana. x. Mahabharata (by Subramaniam). How do you rate this product? ★ ★ ★ ★ ★.

a b Natarajan, Nalini; Nelson, Emmanuel Sampath, eds.

A good English version translation is by Kisari Mohan Ganguli. It is complete scannable and full translation. You can download it here.

About the book:The author has captured with dramatic intensity the movement of the story of the epic Mahabharata. The narrative is vivid, and is a priceless legacy for the young and the old. The story of the Pandavas and the Kauravas and the Mahabharata war has been retold in a superb manner. Though the book is an abridged version of the great epic, all the important aspects have been covered in it. The style is lucid, the dialogues crisp and the characters come alive in front of the readers because of the descriptions by the author. The story is more than just an epic, it tells the story of heroic men and women, code of life, philosophy of social and ethical relations. More details: This book on the Mahabharata starts with the meeting of Ganga and Santanu, and their subsequent marriage, and the birth of their children. When Santanu asks Ganga the reason for drowning the children born to her, she takes the eighth child and disappears from his life. The story continues with Satyavati, Pandu, Dhritarashtra, Pandavas and Kauravas, and ends with the entry of the Pandavas into heaven. The Mahabharata is not a mere epic:it is a romance,telling the tale of heroic men and women and of some who are divine:it is a whole literature in itself,containing a code of life,a philosophy of social and ethical relations,and speculative thought on human problems that is hard to rival,but above all,it has for it's core with Gita,which it,as the world is beginning to find out,the noblest of scriptures and the grandest of sagas the climax of which is reached in the wondrous Acolypse in the eleventh canto.Through such books alone,the harmonies underlying true culture, will one day reconcile the disorders of modern life. The popularity of the book is such that it has run into fourteen editions since it was first published in the year 1965.

Comments: (7)

Ger
Sacred text of Hinduism gets blockbuster treatment
By James Meek
LONDON: Salman Rushdie was threatened with murder for it. William Tyndale was strangled and burned for it. Altering,challenging or even translating sacred texts can be dangerous. But a British Hindu priest expects only praise, high sales and converts from an epic effort of literary digestion launched next week: the 100,000-verse Mahabharata, turned by him into a 1,000-page blockbuster novel.
The novelization of one of Hinduism's holiest texts by the Manchester-based priest, Krishna Dharma - once Ken Anderson, a merchant navy officer - is already on sale in the US, where it has sold more than 5,000 copies.
"I suppose I didn't expect it to be so successful. It's unique, in the sense that there aren't any other English versions like it," said Dharma.
The Mahabharata, which contains the core text of Hinduism, the Bhagavad-gita, has been rendered in English before. But previous attempts have been immense verse-for-verse translations by Sanskrit scholars, or slim, super-abridged paperbacks.
"I want it to become the definitive English version," said Dharma. "I'm pretty confident it will. There's nothing around to compete."
Like the Holy Quran and the Bible, the Mahabharata is believed by Hindus to be largely the work of God (or gods, as some Hindus consider).
Five thousand years ago, the half-divine visionary Vyasadeva is said to have dictated the verses to the elephant-headed being Ganesh. The book's divine origins have not stopped the hard sell. Under the title, the bookjacket proclaims "The Greatest Spiritual Epic of All Time".
The cover illustration shows the saintly Queen Draupadi, lost by her husband in a dice game, being stripped of her garments by an evil prince as leering aristos look on and the god Krishna unreels heavenly robes to cover her virtue. With its intense love scenes,jewelled palaces, vast battles, superheroes, magical weapons and warring families, the novelised version resembles a 20th century saga-cum-soap opera, a marriage of Barbara Taylor Bradford and Arthur Hailey. It has, after all, already been turned into a TV soap, broadcast earlier in the decade on the BBC.
"Ambika peered curiously into the mirror as her maidservants finished adorning her in preparation for the nuptial bed," the book begins. "She had lost none of her beauty despite her months of mourning. Her skin was flawless and as white as milk."
Dharma said: "All I wanted to do was present the original as exactly as I could. I'm not embellishing or interpolating. I'm not adding any of my own ideas.
"There is a message in the original, a profound and sublime message, and I've tried to convey that. It shows the conflict between two sides and its outcome, what happens to those who choose to take shelter and surrender to the Lord and what happens to the others."
Although the advance publicity for the book, published by the US firm Torchlight, promotes the Mahabharata's "timeless message of spiritual enlightenment," and its usefulness for "peace and relaxation", the epic is remarkably gory, with killings, amputations, banter about weapons, and bloody mayhem on almost every page.
In the Bhagavad-gita, the god Krishna urges a hero to overcome his qualms about slaughtering his old friends and relatives in an enemy army because it is his moral duty to correct the error of their ways by killing them and because they will be reincarnated anyway.
Dharma admits there is a lot of war in the Mahabharata.
He said the Nazis, fascinated by Hindu mythology, perverted the epic's message to justify their killing.
"It's a story of conflict, no doubt about it. But even the war is fought in a different way: not, as we have now, a wholesale slaughter of the innocents. In those days it was always fought between warrior classes only. Ordinary people were not involved."
Dharma, who was ordained as a Hindu priest in the monotheistic Vaishnava tradition in 1979, runs a Hindu studies centre and a free kitchen for the homeless in Manchester.
The book is to be launched on Sunday to coincide with the annual Krishna festival parade through London, Rathayatra, which proceeds from Marble Arch to Trafalgar Square.-Observer News Service (c) London Observer.
Arlana
This epic story has effected me greatly. I'm so grateful for a translation that allows me to absorb the story and the teachings. Yes there are some edit errors but not of consequence. As for choosing to read this, if you're considering the purchase, do it. It has answered my questions about life and people and caused me to realize where my flaws exist. I'm so grateful this translation was created. I am so grateful that the epic has survived. As a spiritual seeker, it is essential to me and that is my approach to this book.
Qulcelat
The long, fascinated and epic story is in a beautiful way translated. Also good to read if English is not your first language, not too flowery or complicated. Great for people that are interested in India-history, ethic, wisdom or just like a fascinating story. The Glossary at the end helps for special words or names.
Mahabharata is the family-generation story of the "royal house of Kuru" of India:
The story starts with king Santanu that marries Ganga, of his broken promise and his son Bheeshma. Bheeshma is tested many times by his oat (to help getting his father's heart wish), he is upholding the kingdom for his half brothers and there "children" (the blind Dhritarashtra and Pandu).. and there children, because of faits twists. Finally there is a Great War of the five Pandhavas brothers (Yudhishthira, Bheemasena, Arjuna, Bakula and Sahadeva = divine Incarnations) that have the help of Krishna and other relatives and friends: against the sons of the blind Dhritarashtra, other relatives, friends and teachers.
It is a great and immense story about being carful what we want, justice and right behaviors.
Steamy Ibis
This was another book I read as a teen, so I ordered this for my teens. But when I read it 40 years ago, I didn't have the movies. My boys have seen the movies so they don't have the patience to go through the book. When I go through Kamala Subramaniam's work now, I'm a little more critical of it than I was as a young person. I find her work a little flowery. Of course Sanskrit is flowery, so that will come through in translations. But the story is so wonderful. Mahabharata and Ramayan are a must for all to read.
Friert
I have used this version of the Mahabharata for study and retelling for thirty years now, and was delighted to get it in ebook form. Subramaniam has done a fine job of capturing the essence of this great epic story (and scripture), filled with not only the central storyline, but wisdom and understanding as well.

There is violence in it, as it is not only an epic retelling of a historical series of events, it is also the metaphor for what is happening in the consciousness of all souls - the pulls between our material desires (represented by the Kauravas) and our aspirations to reclaim our divine nature (represented by Krishna and the Pandavas). It is a battleground, and the tale represents that struggle well - but there is no gratuitous violence or sensationalism anywhere in the writing.
Bev
""Krisna, my Lord, don't you recognize me?" he said amid spurts of laughter while standing up with due respect. "I am the real winner of this war, the uncontrolled ego, the Prince of this world. I welcome You and all the Gods to my production. Isn't it amazing that I can turn human beings into deranged homicidal maniacs with a flick of my wrist? Look at the thousands of dismembered bodies and the flowing river of blood. Look at all the suffering produced in the name of self-importance. Incredible, isn't it?" He roared with laughter and continued.
"Congratulations to all the Gods, humanity deserved the punishment.""--Excerpt from my newsletter: The Eye of the Dragon
Mahabharata download epub
Hinduism
Author: Kamala Subramaniam
ISBN: 8172764057
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Subcategory: Hinduism
Language: English
Publisher: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan/Mumbai/India; Fourteenth edition (January 1, 2007)
Pages: 870 pages