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The Book of Ceremonial Magic (Cosimo Classics Metaphysics) download epub

by Arthur Edward Waite


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By Arthur Edward Waite. It includes the rituals of ceremonial magic, the literature, the rituals of black magic and the complete grimoires.

By Arthur Edward Waite. Home Categories Esoteric & Occult.

Arthur Edward Waite (1860-1942) was a professed mystic, an historian of mysticism, alchemy, magic, and secret .

Arthur Edward Waite (1860-1942) was a professed mystic, an historian of mysticism, alchemy, magic, and secret societies, an industrious translator, and a man unusually willing to turn 180 degrees from a published opinion when faced with new and better evidence.

Start by marking The Book of Ceremonial Magic as Want to Read . Published June 1st 2007 by Cosimo Classics (first published 1911).

Start by marking The Book of Ceremonial Magic as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Book of Ceremonial Magic. 1602066809 (ISBN13: 9781602066809). Arthur Edward Waite was a scholarly mystic who wrote extensively on occult and esoteric matters, and was the co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck.

First published in 1911 as The Book of Ceremonial Magic, this classic work explains the rites, mysteries and secret traditions of Witchcraft, Sorcery, and "Infernal Necromancy", and also explores.

As most ancient texts on magical literature are rare and hard to come by, it becomes very difficult for modern scholars to ascertain an accurate knowledge of ancient spells and rituals. First published in 1911 as The Book of Ceremonial Magic, this classic work explains the rites, mysteries and secret traditions of Witchcraft, Sorcery, and "Infernal Necromancy", and also explores.

Arthur Edward Waite was born on October 2, 1857 in Brooklyn, New York

Arthur Edward Waite was born on October 2, 1857 in Brooklyn, New York. He was a poet and scholarly mystic who wrote extensively on occult and esoteric matters, and was the co-creator of the Rider-Waite Tarot deck.

The Book of Ceremonial Magic by Arthur Edward Waite was originally called The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts. It was first published in a limited run in 1898, and distributed more widely under the title The Book of Ceremonial Magic in 1910

The Book of Ceremonial Magic by Arthur Edward Waite was originally called The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts. It was first published in a limited run in 1898, and distributed more widely under the title The Book of Ceremonial Magic in 1910. It is an attempt to document various famous grimoires, explain the history behind them (refuting many of the legends surrounding them), discuss the theology contained therein (.

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Arthur Edward Waite (October 2, 1857 - May 19, 1942) was an occultist and co-creator of the the popular and widely used Rider-Waite Tarot . Waite was a prolific author with many of his works being well received in academic circles.

Arthur Edward Waite (October 2, 1857 - May 19, 1942) was an occultist and co-creator of the the popular and widely used Rider-Waite Tarot deck and author of its companion volume, the Pictorial Key to the Tarot. This was notable for being one of the first decks to illustrate all 78 cards fully, as opposed to the 22 major arcana. Waite was a prolific author with many of his works being well received in academic circles

Cosimo Classics Metaphysics. By (author) Professor Arthur Edward Waite.

Cosimo Classics Metaphysics. As most ancient texts on magical literature are rare and hard to come by, it becomes very difficult for modern scholars to ascertain an accurate knowledge of ancient spells and rituals.

Series Title: Cosimo Classics Metaphysics. Publisher: Cosimo Classics. Author: Arthur Edward Waite. Street Date: June 1, 2007. Item Number (DPCI): 247-00-1065. If the item details above aren’t accurate or complete, we want to know about it.

Arthur Edward Waite writes The Book of Ceremonial Magic as a newer and more accurate edition of his previous title The Book of Black Magic and of Pacts, written in 1898. As most ancient texts on magical literature are rare and hard to come by, it becomes very difficult for modern scholars to ascertain an accurate knowledge of ancient spells and rituals. Waite responds to this lack of accessible literature and approaches this text as a methodical and systematic account of magical procedures of the past. He remains faithful to the original sources before making any conclusions by way of his thorough research methods. Part I provides the reader with essential passages from leading magical texts from the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth centuries. Part II is a more systematically organized version of these ancient texts, adapted by A.E. Waite to the ways of the modern academic. This volume remains one of the best sources of magical procedure, touching on such topics as gods, costume, and the planets and their relation to the supernatural. Although disapproving of the application of magic and the black arts in his introduction, Waite nonetheless defends those victims persecuted throughout history because of their participation in these superstitious beliefs. He also speaks positively about astrology and alchemy, noting them as more important categories of the magical arts. Through this volume, the contemporary reader can finally begin to understand the beliefs in the black arts that were so deeply rooted in our civilization's past.

Comments: (7)

Acrobat
Waite blends ancient trends and traditions with a disregard of white magic in favor of a darker, more threatening kind. he does not devote much time to transcendental aspects of magic as many authors have, but instead, treats the subject of infernal and demonic hierarchies with a bit too much supposed first hand knowledge. some interesting discussions with Latin phrases and esoteric philosophies.
Jeb
This is a great study guide to ceremonial magic. Waite delivers an impressive analysis of the ins and outs with a wonderful conclusion on the reality of the subject. A must read for any student of the occult.
Coiril
It opens your mind up to a new way of thinking but lacks information the real book of black magic has more information and is basically the same book
Landaron
Lacks information and many pages are missing..
Wenaiand
The author
Dobpota
Arthur Edward Waite (1860-1942) was a professed mystic, an historian of mysticism, alchemy, magic, and secret societies, an industrious translator, and a man unusually willing to turn 180 degrees from a published opinion when faced with new and better evidence. His variously titled "Book of Black Magic and of Pacts" (first edition, privately printed 1898; public edition, 1911), or "Book of Ceremonial Magic" (etc.) shows Waite rejecting the misinformation and misrepresentations of his old source and model, "Eliphas Levi" (real name Alphonse Louis Constant, c.1810-1875) and his sometime-associate in the Order of the Golden Dawn, S.L. MacGregor Mathers (1854-1918), and trying to offer the interested public a responsible survey of the literature of ceremonial magic.

The book in question is frequently reprinted, under a variety of similar titles, although it is now very badly dated; I have reviewed another edition, published as "The Book of Black Magic," and repeat my observations here. Under any title, it contains a number of oversights and errors of fact, but it retains considerable value and interest, and is worth reading with care, and *critical* attention. Some titles do raise (various and different sets of) false expectations, however. I have not seen all editions; with the exception of the recent Weiser edition as "The Book of Black Magic," which appears to reprint the shorter, and apparently less (or un-) illustrated, 1898 edition, those I have seen seemed to have identical texts (but there may be differences I've missed).

Waite makes interesting points on the presuppositions of the genuinely early grimoires (books of spells and rituals) which he describes and excerpts, and useful comments on the (un)reliability of the then-current translations, many of which have been reprinted in recent years. Anyone attempting to use it as guide to practicing such magic should heed Waite's warning that he has taken care to present an incomplete or corrupt form of any ritual involving harm to animals, rendering the spells, by the magical hypothesis, ineffective; entirely out of concern for the animals, not the would-be-magicians, he explains.

Indeed, Waite has little patience with the operative magician in general, and with those who supply the demand for spellbooks in particular. He points out that, in terms of procedures and intentions, the magical literature allows no real distinction between "white" and "black" magic; indeed, what is presented as "white" magic, is, by making direct use of religious rites and objects, sometimes the more objectionable. He also points out that the medieval and early modern magicians generally seemed unaware that what they were doing could be considered blasphemous.

Among its other merits, Waite's book provides extended excerpts and illustrations from the leading pseudo-grimoires published in cheap editions in (mainly) France in the nineteenth century. He points out the origins of some of these tracts in more respectable "occult" writings of the eighteenth century. (A rather wavering line probably could now be drawn back all the way to the Hermetic enthusiasts of the Renaissance, and ultimately to Hellenistic Egypt, but all genuine Egyptian content, except mention of the Pyramids and Pharaohs, had vanished along the way.)

Waite attempts, albeit with inadequate data, to establish the medieval date and Christian origins of the various "Books" and "Keys" of Solomon, a task still not complete in detail, and compares these texts to explicitly Christian works, some masquerading as highly effective devotions. The book is concerned with the relatively elite practice of ritual magic, including its many vulgarizations, and not with European witchcraft, nor with Satanism as such.

As Waite points out, the grimoires promise to teach how to compel, bribe, and trick devils, not worship them (although from a theological point of view, as he makes equally clear, the distinction is meaningless). Pacts are attempts to force supernatural beings to serve humans, not promises of one's own soul -- except where the intention is to break the pact.

The nearest successor to Waite's book to appear in English was Elizabeth M. Butler's "Ritual Magic," first published by Cambridge University Press in 1949, and recently reprinted. It shows a dependence on Waite for materials unavailable to its author in wartime and post-war Britain, but has considerable additional material on actual and supposed magicians (including Gilles de Rais), and on nineteenth century magicians, pseudo-magicians, Satanists, pseudo-Satanists, and hoaxes, and provides an invaluable context for understanding Waite's writings, not just this book. Her book can be read as a follow-up, but also as an introduction.

Butler, more importantly, fills a gap in Waite's coverage. "Ritual Magic" offers a good discussion of the various German (and generally Central European) books purporting to contain the magic of Faust; these are generally duller than the French pamphlets described by Waite, but seem to be rather more likely to reflect real attempts to practice the "black arts," and represent a different geographic area. "Ritual Magic" was, in fact, the middle volume of a trilogy on the Faust tradition (including "The Myth of the Magus" and "The Fortunes of Faust'), and Butler's literary interests are clear throughout.

Those with a genuine interest in current research on the history of European traditions of magic will probably want to turn to the essays in "Conjuring Spirits: Texts and Traditions of Medieval Ritual Magic," edited by Claire Fanger (1998), and Richard Kieckhefer's "Forbidden Rites: A Necromancer's Manual of the Fifteenth Century" (1997). These all, especially the latter, contain excerpts of texts to compare to those offered by Waite. (Kieckhefer gives a long Latin text as well.) A shorter survey, covering a number of other topics, and with briefer quotations, is Kieckhefer's "Magic in the Middle Ages" (Cambridge University Press, 1989; the Canto paperback of 2000 has a useful new Preface with updated bibliography). Kieckhefer also provides a good introduction to the historical literature on witch beliefs and persecutions, and how these relate to elite magic; a subject on which the second edition of Norman Cohn's "Europe's Inner Demons" is also enlightening.
Hǻrley Quinn
A.E. Waite (1857-1942) was one of the most important and influential figures in Western occultism. Perhaps best known as the creator of the enormously popular Rider-Waite tarot deck, he was a prolific author and had a leadership role in several occult groups (including the Golden Dawn), some of which he founded.
His Book of Ceremonial Magic (first published in London, 1911?) is a revision of his Book of Black Magic and Pacts (Edinburgh, 1898) It contains a treasurehouse of drawings and quotes from rare handbooks of magic, but it does have some shortcomings. Excerpts often are quoted out of context, without representing any one system intact. Translations are not always reliable and mistakes are surprisingly frequent.
Although Waite himself practised ritual magic, his treatment of the literature here represented is highly critical. I suspect that Waite deliberately chose passages from the most corrupt manuscripts possible to strengthen his invective. For example, he bases his extracts from the Lemegeton on Sl.2731 which is one of the least accurate manuscripts of that text. Also he uses a text titled True Black Magic (La Vraie Magie Noire) to exemplify techniques from the Key of Solomon method, when other versions are clearly more accurate.
This book also suffers from a lack of any form of critical apparatus, bibliography, and index.
Waite did us a service by assembling excerpts from a wide selection of magical texts, giving us a fairly good flavor for the genre, but I advise serious researchers and would-be practitioners of ceremonial magic to use it with caution. Those looking for a much more thorough survey of magical literature would do well to consult E.M. Butler's Ritual Magic, and Lynn Thorndike's History of Magic and Experimental Science.
This was the first book I ever got that dealt with magic and it totally amazed me. I still use it alot almost two decades later and I have just bought a new version of it since the old one is falling apart.

Waite did an excelent job for his time scanning the libraries he had access to for much of the material in it and translating it. Unlike so many other magicians that have read way to many new age books I have noticed that Waite is actually often right and his opposition back then (Crowley and Mathers) usually are wrong. In waites material there are no blinds he just writes what it says and then give his take on it all. I can definatly understand why this upset both Mathers and Crowley. If you want people that definatly leave things out and put huge blinds or deliberatly misleads the readers then go and buy books by Crowley and Mathers because thoose are the experts at doing it.

This is a book that every serious traditional high magician should own and study. In it you find material that you simply will not find anywhere else. It is not a good beginners book on magic though but for the experienced it's a treasure just waiting to be explored.
The Book of Ceremonial Magic (Cosimo Classics Metaphysics) download epub
New Age & Spirituality
Author: Arthur Edward Waite
ISBN: 1602066795
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Subcategory: New Age & Spirituality
Language: English
Publisher: Cosimo Classics (June 1, 2007)
Pages: 376 pages