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The Threefold Lotus Sutra: The Sutra of Innumerable Meanings, The Sutra of The Lotus Flower of the Wonderful Law and The Sutra of Meditation on the Bodisattva Universal Virtue download epub

by W. E. Soothill,Wilhelm Schiffer,Pier P. del Campana,Brunnō Katō,Yoshiro Tamura,Kojiro Miyasaka


Epub Book: 1909 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1983 kb.

The Threefold Lotus Sutra is the composition of three complementary sutras that together form the "three-part Dharma flower sutra": 1. The Innumerable Meanings Sutra (無量義經 Ch: Wú Liáng Yì Jīng, Jp: Muryōgi Kyō), prologue to the Lotus Sutra.

The Threefold Lotus Sutra is the composition of three complementary sutras that together form the "three-part Dharma flower sutra": 1. 2. The Lotus Sutra (妙法蓮華經 Ch: Miào Fǎ Lián Huá Jīng, Jp: Myōhō Renge Kyō) itself.

The Lotus Sutra is one of the most important texts in Buddhism and is considered by many as its finest . The entire work is called The Threefold Lotus Sutra

The Lotus Sutra is one of the most important texts in Buddhism and is considered by many as its finest gem. This text is one of the most famous scriptures of Mahayana Buddhism. It is the second of three sutras. The entire work is called The Threefold Lotus Sutra. The work presented here is the second and most popular sutra of the three, as translated by H. Kern in 1884

Kai and the Soka Gakkai. The Lotus Sutra supposedly relates the final and highest teachings

The Lotus Sutra is one of the most important sutras of Mahay ana. Buddhism and today is revered by millions of people throughout the. world. It was probably composed by a large group of lay writers. Kai and the Soka Gakkai. The Lotus Sutra supposedly relates the final and highest teachings. of the Buddha Shakvamuni on Vulture Peak before his entry into. The purpose of the sutra is the revelation of Shakyamuni’s.

The Journal of Asian Studies. Translated by Bunnō Katō, Yoshirō Tamura, and Kōjirō Miyasaka; with revisions by W. E. Soothill, Wilhelm Schiffer, and Pier P. Del Campana. New York and Tokyo: Weatherhill/Kōsei, 1975.

This is the first English publication of one of the world's great religious classics. Translated by Bunno Katto, Yoshiro Tamura, and Kojiro Miyasaka, with revisions by .

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The Innumerable Meanings Sutra also known as the Infinite Meanings Sutra (Sanskrit: अनन्त निर्देश सूत्र, Ananta Nirdeśa Sūtra; traditional Chinese: 無量義經; ; pinyin: wúliáng yì jīng; Japanese: Muryōgi Ky. .

The Innumerable Meanings Sutra also known as the Infinite Meanings Sutra (Sanskrit: अनन्त निर्देश सूत्र, Ananta Nirdeśa Sūtra; traditional Chinese: 無量義經; ; pinyin: wúliáng yì jīng; Japanese: Muryōgi Kyō; Korean: Muryangeui Gyeong) is a Mahayana buddhist text. According to tradition, it was translated from Sanskrit into Chinese by Dharmajātayaśas, an Indian monk, in 481, however Buswell, Dolce and Muller describe it as an apocryphal Chinese text

This of 4 translation is from "The Threefold Lotus Sutra", translated by Bunno Kato, Yoshiro Tamura, and Kojiro Miyasaka (with revisions by . Del Campana).

This of 4 translation is from "The Threefold Lotus Sutra", translated by Bunno Kato, Yoshiro Tamura, and Kojiro Miyasaka (with revisions by . It was published by Kosei Publishing Co. Namu Myoho Renge Kyo. Namu Amida Butsu.


Comments: (7)

Zainian
This is certainly one of the best Buddhist books available to the English-speaking reader. Not only is the translation of the Lotus Sutra clear and excellent, but this version includes two other sutras, the "Prologue" Sutra of Innumerable Meanings and the "Epilogue" Universal Virtue Sutra, which traditionally accompany the Lotus Sutra in East Asian countries but are not easy to find in English translation.

This version comes with a glossary to explain Sanskrit terms which appear in the Sutras, which is quite helpful. Although the translation to English is done well, this is not the kind of book you can just pick up and read, and clearly understand. It gradually becomes clearer with time, and you could read the Lotus Stura a thousand times and discover something new every time. To accompany this book, particularly if you are new to Buddhism, I would recommend a good commentary, such as "Buddhism for Today" by Nikkyo Niwano, to study along with it to explain some of the allegory and hyperbole one finds in this and other ancient Buddhist literature, the symbolism behind it, and how we can apply these ancient teachings to make our lives and our world better.
Ice_One_Guys
Profound. It wasn't until I was about 3/4 of the way through it before I started recognizing how it was influencing my daily life.
Qumen
This was one of several books used for a college course took on Buddhism. This would be good for groups discussion or independent study. It has the sutra, which is great, but there is a lot of complex language that introduces it, which can bog you down if it doesn't interest you. I woul recommend this book as one of many for Buddhist study.
Jogrnd
Kosei publishers do it again. Wonderful dharma publications. Quality printed books.
Ielonere
About 80% of this text involves long, repetitive descriptions of other worlds and vast myriads of infinite beings acting on a scale of kalpas and kotis. A kalpa is the time it takes for a physical universe to appear and disappear. They come in three durations. A small kalpa is the time it would take for a ten-mile square city covered in poppy seeds to be clean of them if one seed were removed every three years or, alternately, the time required to wear away a ten-mile cubic block of stone if a young woman brushes her dress against it every three years. A koti represents ten million or more, and kalpas are discussed in terms of many kotis or longer. Jewel flowers, celestial flowers and the like fall from heavens for extended periods of time, and myriads of kotis of bodhisattvas attend the Buddha's words and meditate for multiples of kalpas.

Dharma is translated as Law, and the translation also gives the Buddha as being eternal in several places; this jibes uneasily with correct middle way teachings. I had the impression that the translation comes from a Westernized point of view concerning theological matters and never quite escapes.

The sutras contain many words of many blessings accruing to those who read and keep them, and terrible damnations accruing to those who misrepresent them or cause harm to those who engage the teachings.

In here we have the dharma of all vehicles being the great vehicle, the bodhisattva vehicle, and the Buddha tactfully adjusting his teachings according to the capacity of the hearer.

The time required for achieving buddhahood is explained in terms of many kalpas, even to beings already bodhisattvas, with the exception of the eight year old daughter of a dragon, who attained it quite quickly, apparently the only reference to a female achieving Buddhahood in Buddhist sutras. Though it may take a long time, Buddhahood is achievable. The future Buddhahood of many beings is predicted by the World-Honored One, Buddha, in the sutras.

Also, in the first sutra, The Sutra of Innumerable Meanings, middle section, we have the teaching that the dharma is empty.
Shakagul
A good reference, it is a little esoteric but that is to be expected. However I have not thoroughly explored it's full content yet.
Anayalore
I think this is a good book to get if you are interested in the Sutras. I recommend it to you.
beautiful rendering of a timeless scriptural masterpiece
The Threefold Lotus Sutra: The Sutra of Innumerable Meanings, The Sutra of The Lotus Flower of the Wonderful Law and The Sutra of Meditation on the Bodisattva Universal Virtue download epub
Author: W. E. Soothill,Wilhelm Schiffer,Pier P. del Campana,Brunnō Katō,Yoshiro Tamura,Kojiro Miyasaka
ISBN: 0834801051
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Language: English
Publisher: Weatherhill; 1st edition (1975)
Pages: 383 pages