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The Suffering of God: An Old Testament Perspective (Overtures to Biblical Theology) download epub

by Terence E. Frethheim


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The Old Testament God Fretheim documents is a God who has chosen to be involved in human history, in time and space, and is affected and can change because of this involvement.

The Old Testament God Fretheim documents is a God who has chosen to be involved in human history, in time and space, and is affected and can change because of this involvement. This is a God who listens to humans, who holds back judgment, who makes room for an unknown future based on the response of humans. This is definitely Jesus' Abba who treats us with integrity and profound love, and therefore a God I can respond to in the same way. Fretheim has essentially given me back a whole God, a God for everybody no matter what gender or race or status in life.

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The Suffering of God book. This book does a great job bringing to light texts/theological ideas from the Old Testament that are typically overlooked

The Suffering of God book. This book does a great job bringing to light texts/theological ideas from the Old Testament that are typically overlooked. Fretheim deals with the ideas of a God in the midst of his creation, of opening himself up to his creation allowing himself to be hurt by that creation, and a God who empowers his creation and desires his creation to work alongside him.

Theology Страдание Бога - Библейское учение, Suffering of God - Biblical teaching. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

Recommend this journal.

Author : Terence E. Fretheim. Publisher : Augsburg Fortress Publishing. Paul and the Faithfulness of God (Christian Origins and the Question of God).

Book in the Overtures to Biblical Theology Series). In this comprehensive and thought-provoking study, Terence Fretheim focuses on the theme of divine suffering, an aspect of our understanding of God which both the church and scholarship have neglected. by Terence E.

The Suffering of God: An Old Testament Perspective is a book by Old Testament scholar Terence E. In 1984 it appeared as number 14 in the Overtures to Biblical Theology series published by Fortress Press. Most Christians believe the incarnation of God is an exclusively New Testament idea, but in The Suffering of God: An Old Testament Perspective, Terence E. Fretheim argues that incarnation has always been God's standard method of interaction with humanity

TERENCE E. FRETHEIM, professor of Old Testament, is the author of The Suffering of God . August 1991 · Biblical Theology Bulletin A Journal of Bible and Theology.

TERENCE E. FRETHEIM, professor of Old Testament, is the author of The Suffering of God: An Old Testament Perspective (Fortress, 1984). The Rhetoric of Revelation in the Hebrew Bible, by Dale Patrick. Overtures to Biblical Theology May 2002 · Horizons in Biblical Theology August 1991 · Biblical Theology Bulletin A Journal of Bible and Theology.

The author aim is to broaden our understanding of the God of the Old Testament by showing that " suffering belongs to the person and purpose of God"

Comments: (7)

MisTereO
An excellent discussion showing the continuity, and deep links, that characterize the Old Testament understanding of divine being and that of the New Testament. Often one hears the phrase 'God of the Old Testament' as juxtaposed with the 'God of the New Testament.' Undergirded by prodigious erudition, Fretheim's The Suffering of God serves as an invaluable corrective to this modern day Marcionism by showing deep continuity between the Old and New Testament understanding of the attributes, intentions, and nature of the biblical understanding of divine being, and how the life and ministry of Jesus closely reflects those themes and completes the work of the so-called 'God of the Old Testament.'
Hono
It took me a while to get in to this book, and I almost put it down. But around page 40, it really started to get interesting.

Terence Fretheim aims to show that God is not the transcendent being who sits in heaven watching with detached disinterest all the pain and suffering that goes on in the world. Instead, God, through the act of creation, entered fully into our world and suffers right along with us. As a result, He gets himself into compromising situations, takes the blame for horrible human events, and gets His hands dirty in the tragedies of life.

This book will challenge the way you think about God, and will also give you insight into how the incarnation of Jesus Christ was not a late development in God's plan for the world, but was something God has been doing all along.
Nahn
Terence Fretheim is a great biblical theologian. Yet, in this relatively early work, he really outdid himself. This book sets the stage for the theological work of the next thirty years of his career as a theologian. All of his major themes, clearly and concisely, are presented here, allowing him to build upon this work in his subsequent books. These themes include: God's Suffering, the Kind of "Person" that God is, How Prophets are Involved in God's Suffering, God's Concern with Creation, and the Interelatedness of God and God's Creation, among others. This book is challenging and forthright. It is also highly, highly recommended.
Villo
I'm tired of people thinking God of the OT is different than Jesus of the New, and that He was just mean... this is a fresh and Scripturally accurate perspective of His character and relation to His people. Love it!
Jia
I was introduced to this text in a seminary class on Biblical theology and found Fretheim's discussion challenging and provocative. Fretheim demonstrates that the notion of a omniscient,omnipotent God simply is not borne out in the biblical narrative. Rather, we have a portrayal of God as one in a loving relationship with God's people. A loving relationship, by its very nature, implies give-and-take and no one party is allowed control or dominance. Fretheim demonstrates example after example in the scriptures where God is portrayed as influenced, persuaded, surprised,and even confused by the behavior of the people. This is a God who suffers when the people suffer, not a God who is above all and beyond human experience. I have had the privilege to hear Dr. Fretheim speak in person and he is an engaging and challenging theologian with much to offer both the professional student and the arm chair theologian.
Lightseeker
This is the most important book I read in seminary because it has fundamentally changed my idea of God. Like most Christians, I was raised to picture the God of the Old Testament as a holy, transcendent God, perennially angry and punitive, distant and strict. I was a closet Marcionite in the respect that my image of the God of the Old Testament was discontinuous with the God Jesus calls Father. As Fretheim says
. . . the picture of Jesus presented often stands at odds with the commonly accepted picture of God. Attributes such as love, compassion, and mercy, accompanied by acts of healing, forgiving, and redeeming, tend to become narrowly associated with Jesus, while the less palatable attributes and actions of holiness, wrath, power and justice are ascribed only to God. . . . Jesus is friend and God is enemy . . . the atonement gets twisted so that Jesus is seen as the one who came to save us from God. [Fretheim, 2]
In The Suffering of God Fretheim wants to lift up Old Testament metaphors for God, particularly those that have been neglected, like nonmonarchical images that show a God more in line with the New Testament, a God so involved with humanity that God suffers with and for humanity. In order to do this, Fretheim rehabilitates anthropomorphic metaphors for God that have been discredited by Old Testament scholarship since Philo, in particular by scholarship that wants to focus on God as transcendent, immutable, free, sovereign monarch and therefore essentially "other" than human. In the continuity of anthropomorphic metaphors throughout the Old Testament, Fretheim sees an indirect but continuous portrayal of a God who gets ever closer to humanity until finally this God becomes incarnate in Jesus Christ. "In the incarnation, God has acted anthropomorphically in the most supreme way." [Fretheim, 6] By focusing in The Suffering of God on these neglected anthropomorphic metaphors, Fretheim wants to expand the number and kind of metaphors we use "so that our operative fund of them will be more congruent with the biblical witness and our experience of God in the world." [Fretheim, 9] In addition, Fretheim believes that these neglected metaphors are really canon within the canon and that they can help us interpret the whole of the Bible and bring together our thinking about seemingly polar opposites, like God's sovereignty and God's grace [Fretheim, 11]. Fretheim essentially redefines God's freedom, God's ability to change, how much God knows, and how God exercises power in the world by showing a God in continuous relationship with humanity from the very beginning.
. . . the Old Testament reveals a fundamental continuity between God and world. God is graciously present, in, with, and under all the particulars of the creation, with which God is in a relationship of reciprocity. The immanent and transcendent God of Israel is immersed in the space and time of this world. Such a perspective reveals a divine vulnerability, as God takes on all the risks that authentic relatedness entails. Because of what happens to that relationship with those whom God loves, God suffers. [Fretheim, 78]
Across the chapters of The Suffering of God Fretheim has delineated throughout the Old Testament a gradual intensification of the way God is present in and for the world. God is getting closer and closer, desirous of ever increased intimacy, until finally in Jesus Christ, God becomes one with humanity. As the last sentence in the book states, "God's act in Jesus Christ is the culmination of a longstanding relationship of God with the world that is much more widespread in the Old Testament than is commonly recognized" [Fretheim, 166]. Recognition of this image of a suffering, relational God in the Old Testament is Fretheim's purpose in writing this book. Fretheim characterizes God's choice to be in relationship to the created order as a "relationship of reciprocity" [Fretheim, 35]. What is more, Fretheim sees this God-World reciprocity as the predominant Old Testament perspective!
That is an exciting concept to someone who [in spite of familiarity with good Reformed thinking about a God involved in history] was more accustomed to thinking of the God of the Bette Midler song "From a Distance." The Old Testament God Fretheim documents is a God who has chosen to be involved in human history, in time and space, and is affected and can change because of this involvement. This is a God who listens to humans, who holds back judgment, who makes room for an unknown future based on the response of humans. This is not some great puppet master in the sky sadistically toying with us. This is definitely Jesus' Abba who treats us with integrity and profound love, and therefore a God I can respond to in the same way.
Fretheim has essentially given me back a whole God, a God for everybody no matter what gender or race or status in life. Fretheim's ideas of continuity and "canon within the canon" I find to be a more positive way of approaching the Old Testament than the feminist hermeneutic of suspicion. This approach allows me to accept more of the questionable passages of the Old Testament. Even in the wrathful warrior God, the God of the flood, the destroyer of Sodom and Gomorrah, I can now see the kind of God Jesus could call father and whom I, by adoption, can call father too.
TheJonnyTest
This book by Fretheim is deeply insightful, as well as scholarly. It is an excellent resource for any student or teacher of Old Testament literature and theology. I also found it to be inspiring for my own personal spirituality and meditation with its focus, the interaction between scriptural scholarship and relational/creational theology.
Book as advertised. Prompt shipment.
The Suffering of God: An Old Testament Perspective (Overtures to Biblical Theology) download epub
Religious Studies
Author: Terence E. Frethheim
ISBN: 0800615387
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Subcategory: Religious Studies
Language: English
Publisher: Fortress Press (October 1, 1984)
Pages: 224 pages