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by Walter Burkert


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Ancient Mystery Cults (C. .has been added to your Cart. Walter Burkert’s publication of his 1982 Jackson Lectures at Harvard University is another of his important contributions to our understanding of the religions of Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern cultures

Ancient Mystery Cults (C. Walter Burkert’s publication of his 1982 Jackson Lectures at Harvard University is another of his important contributions to our understanding of the religions of Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern cultures. Everything from his pen is welcome and an educatio. is knowledge of the sources is encyclopedic, his judgment in combining them original, illuminating, and persuasive.

Carl newell jackson lectures. Ancient Mystery Cults

Carl newell jackson lectures. Ancient Mystery Cults. In defining the mysteries and describing their rituals, membership, organization, and dissemination, Walter Burkert displays the remarkable erudition we have come to expect of him; he also shows great sensitivity and sympathy in interpreting the experiences and motivations of the devotees.

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Ancient Mystery Cults (Carl Newell Jackson Lectures). 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Ancient Mystery Cults (Carl Newell Jackson Lectures) from your list? Ancient Mystery Cults (Carl Newell Jackson Lectures). Published February 19, 2005 by Harvard University Press.

Secret mystery cults flourished within the larger culture of the public religion of Greece and Rome for roughly a.This book is neither a history nor a survey but a comparative phenomenology.

Secret mystery cults flourished within the larger culture of the public religion of Greece and Rome for roughly a thousand years. In defining the mysteries and describing their rituals, membership, organization, and dissemination, Walter Burkert displays the remarkable erudition we have come to expect of him; he also shows sensitivity and sympathy in interpreting the experiences and motivations of the devotees. Harvard University Press Aleta Ancient Mysteries Historian Psychedelic Play Alcohol Intoxication. Professor Hale gives you a comprehensive look at specific religious archaeological sites around the world, caves and crypts, through vast deserts and ancient cities, from Polynesia to Mexico to the American Midwest.

Similar books and articles. Walter Burkert: Lore and Science in Ancient Pythagoreanism. Farnell's Cults of the Greek States The Cults of the Greek States. Change but Not Decay Peter Brown: The Making of Late Antiquity. Carl Newell Jackson Lectures. By L. R. Farnell, D. Litt.

Ancient Mystery Cults (Carl Newell Jackson Lectures).

Walter Burkert (German: ; 2 February 1931 – 11 March 2015) was a German scholar of Greek mythology and cult

Walter Burkert (German: ; 2 February 1931 – 11 March 2015) was a German scholar of Greek mythology and cult. A professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, he taught in the UK and the US. He has influenced generations of students of religion since the 1960s, combining in the modern way the findings of archaeology and epigraphy with the work of poets, historians, and philosophers.

The foremost historian of Greek religion provides the first comprehensive, comparative study of a little-known aspect of ancient religious beliefs and practices. Secret mystery cults flourished within the larger culture of the public religion of Greece and Rome for roughly a thousand years. This book is neither a history nor a survey but a comparative phenomenology, concentrating on five major cults. In defining the mysteries and describing their rituals, membership, organization, and dissemination, Walter Burkert displays the remarkable erudition we have come to expect of him; he also shows great sensitivity and sympathy in interpreting the experiences and motivations of the devotees.

Comments: (7)

JoJoshura
While not as excellent as 'Homo Necans' (though few books are).

An invaluable addition to the library of anyone studying Ancient Greeks and/or mystery cults.

Well written, easy to read.
Otiel
When you come to the Path, from someone or somewhere, you have heard about the Mystery. This books gives to the student, academic or pagan a good historical research of what can be the Mystery that we celebrate.
Whatever
I find the subject of ancient religions extremely interesting and Burkert gave me a point of view I've not read before. He obviously knows his subject and has an opinion on it.

I would have given it a five stars but I found it sometimes difficult to follow all of his ideas. Anyone new to the subject might have a difficult time with this book.

Question: why are so many of the books on ancient religions so over priced?
Saintrius
I've been researching and studying mythology and rites for years, and I was eager to buy this book. It was somewhat of a disappointment. It falls short in information, I found it too superficial. It does cling to one single view of the mystery cults, which also doesn't help - specially when you're versed in comparative mythology, or any comparative schools at all. Had I known it would be so poor on details, I wouldn't have bought it.

(And the review is just as short as are the information on the book)
Jube
While Burkett is recognized as one of the leading scholars of classical Greece, I found his suppositions about the ancient mystery cults somewhat stretched, and must be rooted in Burkett's own agenda in speaking with/against previous scholars. Burkett spends the first half of this work questioning long held assumptions about the nature of afterlife belief within the cults, as he examines votive offerings and other miscellaneous archeological data asking what really do such things tell us? But of course such things tell us very little, for which archeology is a soft science filled with supposition.

This work is useful as a pause to historical critique and supposition, but ultimately those who speak of the mystery cults in the past (Plato, Pindar, and even Virgil) all make it clear that the cults consisted of rituals and initiations preparing one for the journey in the aftrlife. While we actually know very little about what they actally entailed (actually, we know very little about most of ancient history) the truth is Burkett's approach is not exceptional, but informative.
Ballardana
The four chapters of this book are taken from a series of lectures that Burkert gave in 1982. They all examine aspects of mystery cults in general rather than each cult individually. The introduction, which describes the Eleusinian mysteries and those dedicated to Dionysus, Magna Mater, Isis, and Mithras, gives the reader the basic background for understanding what follows. The four lectures discuss: how the mysteries satisfied worshippers' personal religious needs; the communities of initiates in each cult, and how they were organized; mystery cults' theology, or lack thereof; and what the mystery rites actually consisted of. This structure means that the reader doesn't get a complete description of any of the individual cults. Instead, Burkert looks at each of them while discussing the main topic in each essay.

Burkert challenges many old assumptions about the mystery cults. He expresses skepticism about the use of hallucinogens or other drugs during the mystery rites, saying the circumstances of most rites really weren't well suited for a drug trip. He shows that the mysteries had no systematic theology and their religious communities were fairly loosely organized. He especially challenges the notion that the mysteries guaranteed a better afterlife for their initiates.

A lot of this criticism is justified. Hallucinogen-based mystery rites seemed plausible amid the drug-centered mysticism of the 1960s counterculture, but by 1982 the effects of hallucinogens were well understood, and Burkert was able to point out the dissimilarity between them and the mystery cults. More fundamentally, scholars for generations before Burkert were working with the unspoken assumption that Christianity is the model for what a real religion should be like. To them, the mysteries seemed like half-formed precursors to this type of religion, and they often assumed that the mysteries were more Christian-like than they really were. Scholars in the 1970s and 1980s reacted against these faulty assumptions, and their skeptical views held sway when these lectures were given. Nevertheless, I think Burkert downplayed afterlife beliefs too much, and more recent studies of the mystery cults tend to agree with me.

Burkert is often insightful, especially about the psychological phenomena underlying the mystery cults. But this really isn't a complete examination of the mysteries. A reader looking for one should turn to Mystery Cults of the Ancient World by Hugh Bowden, which describes the historical context extensively, or Initiation into the Mysteries of the Ancient World by Jan Bremmer, which gives straightforward descriptions of the rites and examines them just as thoughtfully as Burkert does. This book works best as a supplement to those two.
Ancient Mystery Cults (Carl Newell Jackson Lectures) download epub
Religious Studies
Author: Walter Burkert
ISBN: 0674033876
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Subcategory: Religious Studies
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard University Press (October 15, 1989)
Pages: 181 pages