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Isaiah 53: Who is the Servant? download epub

by Gerald Sigal


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Here we investigate the evidence presented over the last 2000 thousand years for the two leading candidates Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53:12? Answering this question is what this study is all about.

Here we investigate the evidence presented over the last 2000 thousand years for the two leading candidates Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53:12? Answering this question is what this study is all about.

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Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53:12? Answering this question is what this study is all about

Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53:12? Answering this question is what this study is all about. org to approved e-mail addresses.

Isaiah 53: Who Is the Servant? The Blood Atonement Deception:How Christianity Distorted Biblical Atonement The Resurrection Fantasy: Reinventing Jesus.

Isaiah’s Suffering Servant played a decisive role in forming the Jesus myth among certain Christian groups. It provided an outline to guide them in describing what they imagined Jesus’ ministry to have been. There is no doubt that the New Testament authors had the suffering servant in mind in developing their respective works. Rewarding the servant: The servant is to be raised to a higher position in the estimation of those who were previously appalled at the sight of him. Does He shall be exalted and lifted up, and shall be very high refer to Jesus’ alleged rewards after death in heaven and on earth?

Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53:12? Answering this question is what this study is all about.

Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53:12? Answering this question is what this study is all about. Here we investigate the evidence presented over the last 2000 thousand years for the two leading candidates for this role of servant of the Lord. The two are Jesus and the Jewish people. Christians see in this passage the literal fulfillment by Jesus of all it contains

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Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53:12? Answering this question is what this study is all about. Through the centuries countless commentaries have been written, tracts have been distributed, debates have raged over the identification of the servant in

Comments: (4)

BlackBerry
This book is a must read to every person who wants to understand the content of Isaiah 53 from a Jewish perspective.
Vetalol
Gerald Sigal is a Jewish researcher who has written probably the most in-depth book-length critiques (The Jew and the Christian Missionary: A Jewish Response to Missionary Christianity,Trinity Doctrine Error: A Jewish Analysis,THE BLOOD ATONEMENT DECEPTION: HOW CHRISTIANITY DISTORTED BIBLICAL ATONEMENT,Anti-Judaism in the New Testament) of certain arguments that SOME Christian "missionary" types use against traditional Jews.

He writes in the Introduction to this 2007 book, "Who is the servant of Isaiah 52:13-53;12?... the two leading candidates ... are Jesus and the Jewish people... But the purpose of this volume is not simply to have an intellectual discussion of the issues involved. Its intent is to make it an unavoidable issue for Christians that there are very real disqualifications of Jesus from being the suffering servant and to identify the subject of the servant passage as none other than the nation of Israel."

Here are some quotations from the book:

"Among the unavoidable problems presented by the Christian interpretation of this passage are: ... Did Jesus open his mouth in protest against his situation? (verse 7)... Was Jesus buried with the wicked? (verse 9) ... Did Jesus use violence? (verse 9) Was Jesus deceitful? (verse 9) Did Jesus see SEED? (verse 10)..." (Pg. 11-12)
"A surgical selection from a biblical passage is the hallmark of midrashic exegesis. However, when speaking of literal fulfillment the ENTIRE context must be taken into account and fulfilled. For example, Matthew alleges that the child Jesus literally was brought by Joseph and Mary out of Egypt to fulfill a supposed prophecy to be found in Hosea 11:1... However, the context of Hosea's verse indicates that the prophet's reference is to the Exodus." (Pg. 17)
"Even before the advent of Christianity there was uncertainty in some quarters concerning the identification of the servant described in Isaiah 52:13-53:12." (Pg. 18)
"(T)here are NO clearly identifiable messianic prophecies in the Bible and NO direct mention of the Messiah." (Pg. 26)
"Jesus sacrificed absolutely NOTHING if he was a supernatural being. He knew what his mission on earth was, he knew that this was a temporary death, he knew he would be restored to life with an (intact) body, and he knew he was to be well rewarded for allowing himself to be executed." (Pg. 107)
"(I)t must be reiterated that at his trial before Pilate, John's Jesus is depicted as skillfully defending himself. At no time does he humble himself, but, on the contrary, presents a clever verbal defense before Pilate." (Pg. 156)
"Jesus' afflictions came about, not because he took upon himself the sins of other men, but because he provoked the Romans by pressing his messianic claims." (Pg. 165)
Mettiarrb
If you are a Christian missionary to the Jews
and you read Gerald Sigal's book on Isaiah 53,
you're on a Kamikazes mission.

Forget all the proofs you've been spoon-fed,
Sigal pulls the rug out from under your legs.

You'll feel as if you were body slammed by
Haystacks Calhoun and the Hulk at the same
time.

Sigal's writing is simple and easy to understand.
His proofs are impossible to repudiate.

And so when missionaries read this book, they
aren't going to be able to attack the content,
instead, they will have to attack the author.

If you are Jewish and someone told you that Isaiah 53
is talking about Jesus, that dog just ain't gonna
hunt (as they say in the south).

If you are a missionary and read this book, all
of your beliefs are going to be crushed.

Sigal is methodical and leaves no stone unturned.

It is well worth ordering....

Unless you are on Kamikaze duty.
Anarius
I was attracted to this book because of Gerald Sigal's in-depth knowledge of Hebrew and his reputation for having a working knowledge of the Christian scriptures; enviable qualities in any author today.

He opens with a strong and very convincing argument that, although it is true that some of the ancient scribes and rabbis identified the Suffering Servant of Isaiah 53 with a singular, future, Messiah King - there is no concrete evidence to support the notion that Jewish teachings were altered in direct response to Christian theological exegesis. The reason for the change is left unanswered.

We know that during periods of extreme hardship, Messianic yearnings among the Jewish people intensified, and the emphasis of rabbinical preaching was to assure persecuted communities that God was not removed from their anguish, indifferent to their fate, or had broken His promise to send a Redeemer. We also know with absolute certainty that later Rabbi's would all come to view Israel itself as the Suffering Servant and the major force in humanity's future redemption.

Along the way, the author introduces us to small samples of the rich literary and cultural history of Judaism; the Talmud, compelling tales and maxims from a variety of Midrash sources, and Jewish philosophy. This is Gerald Sigal at his very best--making my purchase well worth the cover price.

It is worth saying one other thing. If a consensus existed among Jewish scholars that Isaiah 53 is Messianic, then it would be valuable for outsiders to take note. But Sigal makes it clear from the outset that this case is closed. His carefully worded thesis is: "EVEN IF Isaiah 53 was Messianic, certain difficulties occur when applying it to Jesus." In effect, it is an argument crafted so that he can not lose. (Sigal is never open-minded; merely clever.)

What follows is not recommended for anyone with high blood pressure or a weak stomach. In an unrestrained attack against the perceived threat posed by the rapid spread of Messianic Judaism, Sigal directs his list of highly insulting, transparently insincere, and inflammatory questions: Was Jesus humble? Was he deceitful? Did Jesus advocate violence? Was it sufficient that a rich man owned the empty tomb, or did a rich man have to be buried with him? What portion does Jesus have with the great? Where is his seed? Can God, or a part of God, die?

Extracting NT verses like a self-righteous authority, he more often manipulates texts according to the needs of his own psyche. By the end of the book, the author had strayed so far from rabbinical teachings about the spiritual ideals of Isaiah 53, it was hard to find evidence of simple human decency.

As I closed the final page of Sigal's latest book, I was left with one horrible thought. Perhaps Martin Luther was right. "The converted Jew has no worse oppressor than his own people."
Isaiah 53: Who is the Servant? download epub
Religious Studies
Author: Gerald Sigal
ISBN: 1425744567
Category: Religion & Spirituality
Subcategory: Religious Studies
Language: English
Publisher: Xlibris (May 10, 2007)
Pages: 278 pages