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Outlaw of Gor download epub

by John Norman


Epub Book: 1881 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1565 kb.

Outlaw of Gor The Gorean Saga: Book 2 John Norman A Note on the Manuscript My friend, Harrison Smith, a young lawyer of the city, has recently given me a second manuscript . Outlaw of Gor. The Gorean Saga: Book 2. John Norman. A Note on the Manuscript.

Outlaw of Gor The Gorean Saga: Book 2 John Norman A Note on the Manuscript My friend, Harrison Smith, a young lawyer of the city, has recently given me a second manuscript . My friend, Harrison Smith, a young lawyer of the city, has recently given me a second manuscript, purportedly by the individual Tarl Cabot.

Shelve Outlaw of Gor. Want to Read. Book 3. Priest-Kings of Gor. by John Norman. In this tenth volume of John Norman's Gor series

Shelve Outlaw of Gor. In this tenth volume of John Norman's Gor series. ore. Shelve Tribesmen of Gor.

Outlaw of Gor - Tarl Cabot of Ko-ro-ba seeks vengeance on the priest-gods of Sardar. by. sci-fi, gorean, erotic, slave. folkscanomy sexuality; folkscanomy; additional collections. Outlaw of Gor - Tarl Cabot of Ko-ro-ba seeks vengeance on the priest-gods of Sardar.

John Norman, born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1931, is the creator of the Gorean Saga, the longest-running series .

John Norman, born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1931, is the creator of the Gorean Saga, the longest-running series of adventure novels in science fiction history.

Yet Tarl finds that his name on Gor has been tainted, his city defiled, and all those he loves made outcasts. He is no longer in the position of a proud warrior, but an outlaw for whom the simplest answers must come at a high price. He wonders why the Priest-Kings have called him back to Gor, and whether it is only to render him powerless. Rediscover this brilliantly imagined world where men are masters and women live to serve their every desire.

The crowd seemed eager to observe what would happen next.

The crowd seemed eager to observe what would happen next neath the billowing silk of the awnings, rearranged its silken cushions, partook distractedly of candies and sweetmeats distributed by grey-robed figures. Mingled with calls for the tarn, occasional taunts and jibes carried across the sand. Perhaps the Amusements of Tharna were not spoiled at all; perhaps the best was yet to come?

John Norman, born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1931, is the creator of the Gorean Saga, the longest-running series of adventure novels in science fiction history.

John Norman is the pen name of John Frederick Lange, Jr. (born June 3, 1931), who is the author of the Gor series of fantasy novels, and a professor of philosophy. John Lange was born in Chicago, Illinois, to John Frederick Lange and Almyra D. Lange (née Taylor). He began his academic career in the early 1950s, earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Nebraska in 1953, and his Master of Arts degree from the University of Southern California in 1957.

Outlaw of Gor. Annotation. Tarl Cabot’s long exile was over. Publisher: Ballantine Books, New York, 1967. Again he was back on Gor, the strange world of counter earth, where he had once been the proudest warrior and mightiest Tarnsman of that savage planet. But nothing was as it had been. His home city Ko-Ro-Ba was destroyed, razed until not one stone remained standing. His beautiful mate Talena, was dead or vanished. His family and friends where scattered across the globe.


Comments: (7)

Steep
A few years ago I decided to revisit the Gorean Saga. I had read a handful of the early Gor books from the sixties and seventies when I was a teenager, starting with book one and reading them in order. After reading many of the reviews online I purchased ten of the Gorean Saga books. I didn’t read them all back to back so it took me a few years to read them all. I mixed them in with other books I wanted to read. I read a wide variety of stuff each year, everything from nonfiction to westerns. About half of what I read is sci-fi and fantasy, averaging 50-60 books a year.

These are the Gor books I read. After each book I’ve included how many stars I gave the story. Notice how the page count increases as the series goes on. This is not a good thing as I explain below.

Book 1 – Tarnsman of Gor (1966) p166 – 4 stars
Book 2 – Outlaw of Gor (1967) p220 – 2 stars
Book 3 – Priest-Kings of Gor (1968) p328 – 4 stars
Book 4 – Nomads of Gor (1969) p372 – 3 stars
Book 5 – Assassin of Gor (1971) p392 – 5 stars
Book 6 – Raiders of Gor (1971) p332 – 4 stars
I skipped Book 7 because the POV character changes from Tarl Cabot to Elinor Brinton.
Book 8 – Hunters of Gor (1974) p372 – 2 stars
Book 9 – Marauders of Gor (1975) p313 – 3 stars
Book 10 – Tribesman of Gor (1976) p449 – 1 stars
Book 33 – Rebels of Gor (2013) p654 – 2 stars

I found some of the stories good. But many of the books are bloated bores, lectures on the wonderments of female slavery instead of adventure stories. I read for adventure, not boring slave lectures. The stories I rated the highest are the ones with a high adventure to lecture ratio. Most of the books could be cut in half without losing any of the story. I’ll use Book 33, Rebels of Gor, as an example. It’s a 200-300 page adventure wrapped up in a long, repetitious, boring, slave lecture. The same information and dialogue are repeated over, and over, and over, and over, and . . . (Get the idea?)

If I revisit the Gorean Saga I’ll probably only read a few of the books that I found interesting this time around. In the meantime I’ll be spending more time with some of my favorite sci-fi and fantasy writers, Douglas Adams, Isaac Asimov, Paolo Bacigalupi, Ray Bradbury, Orson Scott Card, Jack Campbell, Arthur C. Clarke, Earnest Cline, Suzanne Collins, Abe Evergreen, Diana Gabaldon, Joe Haldeman, Robert A. Heinlein, Hugh Howey, George Martin, Larry Niven, Andre Norton, George Orwell, Patrick Rothfuss, Brandon Sanderson, John Scalzi, J.R.R. Tolkien and Andy Weir.

Starship Troopers (1959) (not like the movie) by Robert A. Heinlein is the book that got me started in sci-fi adventures, and has remained one of my top five favorite military science fiction adventure stories for decades. The Forever War (1974) by Joe Haldeman, Armor (1984) by John Steakley, Ender’s Game (1985) by Orson Scott Card and Old Man’s War (2005) by John Scalzi, round out my top five military sci-fi adventure stories.
Onnell
So I actually read Captive of Gor first in this series. It was recommended as a good example of Gorean beliefs regarding bdsm. It was aweful...so aweful. I decided to go ahead and try book one and discovered that although the writing isn't much better it's more fun. I could never say these books are amazing but with the campy adventure in the first two it redeems the 7th. I enjoy the world building, creatures, and even the laugh I get from the far to convenient appearance of my favorite charater the tarn. John Norman is very clueless about how women think. I wonder how accurate the male thinking is to other males. As a female and a lesbian it's kind of a bummer that different types of relationships seem not to exist on gor, but at least the tarn has great fun.
Ziena
I read these when I was a teenager and really liked the first 4 or 5 books. I read most of the rest of the series but found it really distracting that the author seemed to be pushing some kind of philosophy or agenda concerning women as slaves. Now, at 51 years of age, I find myself re-reading old sci-fi or fantasy for nostalgia's sake but with this series, I will stop after book 5 or 6. It's too bad (in my opinion) that it starts to get preachy after that because I find the action and adventure aspects of it to be very well written, not to mention the overall concept of Gor as being a counter-earth.
Amis
John Norman is, as always, a mediocre writer whose characters have all the depth and realism of hand-puppets. Harlequin romance goes to Mars. thud and blunder dales of derring-do. Intellectual popcorn. HOWEVER the world he creates for these marionettes is fascinating. I often wonder what Gor would have been like if written by Robert Heinlein, Silverberg, Niven and Pournelle or similar science fiction author...

HOWEVER, Amazon came through as ever, delivering on time and in good packaging. Gotta love Prime membership! :)
Crazy
First read these when I was a kid, back in the sixties. Needed to find out if they were as good as I remembered. They are. I enjoy them just as much now as I did back then. Tarl Cabot remains a favorite character of mine. I'm not one to usually mix my Science and Sword & Sorcery, but this series of books by Mr. Norman do the job well.
Hi_Jacker
This book starts harsh and gives us an insight into the inhuman qualities of the priest-kings. However the general sense of adventure vs. an overindulgence in male dominance philosophy in the later books continues.
Tarl is searching for his family/friends and Talena and ends up in the city of Tharna. At first the female dominated society which is just not working seems a shallow tool to hide the author's disdain for female dominance, but after finishing the book it works out rather nicely. The escape from the silver mines was particularly well accomplished.
Some have critisized Norman's writing: there is a scene here which I thought proved the opposite. When Tarl and Thorn are fighting in the throne room and their reflections are in the water of a pool, their shadows fighting with them and all this is reflected in the golden mask of the girl watching them, I thought this brought the scene to life well.
Lahorns Gods
I really enjoyed the first book, but there is something about this particular book that bothers me. I can't put my finger on it, but I think it's a lack of subtlety. As soon as Tarl begins to put on his gear you have a pretty good idea of what's going on. Unfortunately it takes a couple more chapters for the main character to catch on. John Norman has built a fantastic world with an interesting society, but it seems he doesn't know how to handle the individual characters that inhabit it. I'm not done with the book, yet, but I am not enjoying it nearly as much as the first book in the series.
Outlaw of Gor download epub
Fantasy
Author: John Norman
ISBN: 0809500809
Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Language: English
Publisher: Wildside Press (May 2004)
Pages: 228 pages