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The Face In The Frost download epub

by John Bellairs


Epub Book: 1529 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1747 kb.

Hailed by critics as an extraordinary work, combining the thrills of a horror novel with the inventiveness of fantasy, The Face in the Frost is the debut novel that launched John Bellairs' reputation as one of the most individual voices in young adult fiction. The Face in the Frost.

Hailed by critics as an extraordinary work, combining the thrills of a horror novel with the inventiveness of fantasy, The Face in the Frost is the debut novel that launched John Bellairs' reputation as one of the most individual voices in young adult fiction. Рrospero and Roger Bacon, the two main characters in a story that seems crammed with wizards, were wizards. They knew seven different runic alphabets, could sing the Dies Irae all the way through to the end, and knew what a Hand of Glory was.

Gary Gygax included The Face in the Frost on his now-famous list of books that influenced the first iteration of Dungeons .

Gary Gygax included The Face in the Frost on his now-famous list of books that influenced the first iteration of Dungeons & Dragons. I'd known about it myself for 30-plus years, but I'd never gotten around to reading it. On the upside, it's short compared to most novels these days. It's also lighthearted for a fantasy work: Bellairs doesn't take himself too seriously, and he's happy to throw in laughs now and again. I also urge you to get a copy of MAGIC MIRRORS by John Bellairs, a compilation of several of his works including The Face In The Frost and a sadly never-finished manuscript for its sequel, The Dolphin Cross, plus other quirky and witty stories.

The Face in the Frost is a short 1969 fantasy novel by author John Bellairs. Unlike most of his later works, this book is meant for adult readers. It centers on two accomplished wizards, Prospero ("and not the one you're thinking of"). It centers on two accomplished wizards, Prospero ("and not the one you're thinking of") and Roger Bacon, tracking down the source of a great magical evil. The subject matter prompted Ursula K. Le Guin to say of the novel, "The Face in the Frost takes us into pure nightmare before we know it-and out the other side.

Both he and an The Face in the Frost is a fantasy classic, defying categorization with . I think that's the reason I love this book so much.

Both he and an The Face in the Frost is a fantasy classic, defying categorization with its richly imaginative story of two separate kingdoms of wizards, stymied by a power that is beyond their control. A tall, skinny misfit of a wizard named Prospero lives in the Southern Kingdom a patchwork of feuding duchies and small manors, all loosely loyal to one figurehead king. John Bellairs has managed to capture perfectly the ominous disorientation that I sometimes experience when I just wake up. I first encountered Bellairs as a very young reader. He wrote many books for children.

The Face in the Frost. Publisher: Macmillan, London, 1969. Author: John Bellairs. The Face in the Frost is a fantasy classic, defying categorization with its richly imaginative story of two separate kingdoms of wizards, stymied by a power that is beyond their control.

John Bellairs Bellairs is best known for his children's books, with an added boost recently from The House With a Clock in Its Walls being released as . .

Lin Carter called The Face in the Frost one of the best fantasy novels to appear since The Lord of the Rings. Absolutely first class. With a unique blend of humor and darkness, it remains one of the most beloved tales by the Edgar Award–nominated author also known for the long-running Lewis Barnavelt series. Bellairs is best known for his children's books, with an added boost recently from The House With a Clock in Its Walls being released as a movie. This isn't a kids' book. Not that it contains any.

The Face in the Frost is the third book by John Bellairs. The short fantasy novel is his first and only book to center on wizards Prospero and Roger Bacon. The Face in the Frost was an attempt to write in the Tolkien manner. I was much taken by The Lord of the Rings and wanted to do a modest work on those lines.

A richly imaginative story of wizards stymied by a power beyond their control, A Face in the Frost combines the thrills of.

A richly imaginative story of wizards stymied by a power beyond their control, A Face in the Frost combines the thrills of a horror novel with the inventiveness of fairy tale–inspired fantasy. Prospero, a tall, skinny misfit of a wizard, lives in the South Kingdom-a patchwork of feuding duchies and small manors, all loosely loyal to one figurehead king. Along with his necromancer friend Roger Bacon, who has been on a quest to find a mysterious book, Prospero must flee his home to escape ominous pursuers.

A dark power is growing in the depths of two wizard kingdoms. The powerful Prospero and his sidekick Roger Bacon must navigate the magical realm to defeat their ancient enemy.

"Authentic fantasy by a writer who knows what wizardry is all about." --Ursula LeGuin

"The tale is rich, hilarious, inventive, filled with infectious good-humor, grisly horror, slithering evil, bumbling monarchs, and various & sundry menaces of the supernatural variety." --Lin Carter


Comments: (7)

Benn
I picked up this book because it was listed in Gary Gygax's famous "Appendix N" (fantasy works that had inspired the creation of Dungeons & Dragons). The book concerns wizards living in a fantasy realm that is supposed to be closely linked to our world in a late medieval/early Renaissance setting (mention is made of England and other countries of our world, yet the action takes place around two fantasy realms, the Northern Kingdom and the Southern Kingdom). There is some really gorgeous prose, and wonderful conceptions of how wizardry works. I found the overall plot a little muddy, but that hardly seemed to matter - it was just fun to read!
Forey
John Bellairs was fanciful, and imaginative, and he loved to play with words using incredible vocabulary.
His children's books reflect a love of classic horror, and of magic, but they were clearly for young adults. The Face in the Frost was the one journey he took in that direction which was intended for adults, and it is an incredible story, reflecting a knowledge of theology, of myth, of story, immensely deep vocabulary, and a depth of references to other works only surpassed in Silverlock. Cinderella, Lovecraft, Tolkien, Shakespeare, theological works, they are all here, inside a work of his own imagination which I'd whimsical, and dark and deeply scary in a way which reaches into the dark midnight shadows of our inner childhood and brings back the cold fear we all recall. If you delight in language, and imagination, and fantasy, and story telling, go no further. This book is for you. It's not a bloody tale of monsters, but a tale of colorful men facing a cold gray darkness which threatens everyone in a mysterious way. Bellairs never wrote another like it, which is a pity, but this one story is a gift.
Ffleg
I read this as a kid and loved it. It looks like some of the eBook issues have been addressed--I'm not seeing the typos mentioned in the other reviews, for example. But this eBook has been formatted in a small and ugly sans-serif font that overrides your font preferences--so I still can't recommend it as an eBook. Can't fathom why publishers ever do this.
Мох
Gary Gygax included *The Face in the Frost* on his now-famous list of books that influenced the first iteration of Dungeons & Dragons. I'd known about it myself for 30-plus years, but I'd never gotten around to reading it.

On the upside, it's short compared to most novels these days. It's also lighthearted for a fantasy work: Bellairs doesn't take himself too seriously, and he's happy to throw in laughs now and again.

On the downside, *The Face in the Frost* doesn't leave much of an impression. It's a fun read, and the two central characters are interesting, but it's not what I'd call a page-turner. If Bellairs weren't such a talented wordsmith, I'd have left it three stars, since the plot itself is fairly "meh".
Bynelad
This has been one of my favorites since I found the first edition remaindered many years ago. I still have that edition, battered and torn.
I have never read any other fantasy novel quite like it: There are no gigantic wars, just 2 clever and charming(but somewhat silly) wizards trying to save the world. There is genuine horror, but not going into grossness ilke too much horror lit nowadays.

When I found it was available on Kindle, I jumped to get it. I was glad to see the original illustrations were included.
However the numerous and annoying formatting problems tempered my joy. There is a space missing after every italicized word so it runs into the next work likethis.
There are random commas inserted here and there without, any pattern, like, this!
There are 2 mangled sentences in the very first (and my favorite!) chapter:
"On the artichoke dome was a weather vane shaped like a dancing of the observatory was a weather vane shaped like a dancing hippopotamus..."

I hope these issues are addressed. I would like to be able to read this favorite without irritation.

Update 11/19/16: It seems like the issues I mentioned earlier have been fixed. However most of the illustrations are now missing! Very disappointing. The older version had typos but at least it had the wonderful pictures.
Wrathmaster
Charming and spooky and completely fun. This is what you might call "light horror" something really, really creepy but with no gore or violence. The menaces are extremely creative and original, very much like something out of nightmares. There is no safe place for Prospero and Roger as they battle omens, specters, and more. The story grows bigger and the threat more widespread throughout the book. The tension is incredible and by the climax everything has truly reached a fever pitch. I can tell it'll be something I reread again over the years. As a child I loved Bellairs's children's books and never even realized that he did adult things. This seems to me to be something that all ages would enjoy. A great read for a stormy night!
Gribandis
I discovered this book in 2014 and I love it so much that I bought four different copies--one for work, one for at home, two for friends. It is quite simply the most spell-binding fantasy novel I have ever read, pure wizardry! For dedicated lovers of magic, wizards, whimsy and stark terror, this novel has it all...and the illustrations by Marilyn Fitschen are absolutely delightful.
I also urge you to get a copy of MAGIC MIRRORS by John Bellairs, a compilation of several of his works including The Face In The Frost and a sadly never-finished manuscript for its sequel, The Dolphin Cross, plus other quirky and witty stories.
I want to read this book for about 30 years. Finally got around to it, and I am sort of glad that I waited. I don’t think I would’ve appreciated it as much when I was younger. It has some great and disturbing and horrific imagery. I wish JB had lived longer and written more adult fiction.
The Face In The Frost download epub
Fantasy
Author: John Bellairs
ISBN: 0441225306
Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Subcategory: Fantasy
Language: English
Publisher: Ace (July 1, 1984)