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The Humanoids download epub

by Jack Williamson


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John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 – November 10, 2006), who wrote as Jack Williamson, was an American science fiction writer, often called the "Dean of Science Fiction". especially after the death of Robert Heinlein in 1988)

John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 – November 10, 2006), who wrote as Jack Williamson, was an American science fiction writer, often called the "Dean of Science Fiction". especially after the death of Robert Heinlein in 1988). Early in his career he sometimes used the pseudonyms Will Stewart and Nils O. Sonderlund.

Jack Williamson had the longest career of any writer in the history of Science Fiction; he published his first .

Jack Williamson had the longest career of any writer in the history of Science Fiction; he published his first story in 1927 and his last novel in 2005. This novel is one of the highlights of his career, and a true classic of the genre. Still later, the two works were published as one book, again under the title of "The Humanoids.

Slowly the humanoids spread throughout the galaxy, threatening to stifle all human endeavor. if it's not already too late. Fist published in Astounding Science Fiction during the magazine's heyday, The Humanoids-sceince fiction grand master Jack Williamson's finest novel-has endured for fifty years as a classic on the theme of natural versus artificial life.

On the far planet Wing IV, a brilliant scientist creates the humanoids - sleek black androids programmed to serve humanity. But are they perfect servants - or perfect masters? Slowly the humanoids spread throughout the galaxy, threatening to stifle all human endeavor. I’m not sure if it’s just the nature of Golden Age SF, but this book is a real mess Читать весь отзыв.

The pacing is weird, as Jack Williamson goes through the key moments (like the humanoid takeover of Starmont society), as well as having characters totally disappear (the entire psychic team mostly fades away after an elaborate introduction, .

Jack Williamson (1908 - 2006) John Stewart 'Jack' Williamson was born in Arizona in 1908 and raised in an isolated New Mexico farmstead. After the Second World War, he acquired degrees in English at the Eastern New Mexico University, joining the faculty there in 1960 and remaining affiliated with the school for the rest of his life. Williamson sold his first story at the age of 20 - the beginning of a long, productive and successful career, which started in the pulps, took in the Golden Age and extended right into his nineties.

Jack Williamson The Humanoids. 2 people like this topic.

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Comments: (7)

Nayatol
This is an old style science fiction story, I believe it even mentions slide rules.
A Mr. Underhill runs a company that builds mechanical persons, helpers. They are not very good, but they are the best he can do. He inherited the business from his father-in-law, and has been trying to make a go of it ever since. He comes across a storefront that is selling humanoids, same as him, only better. Depressing as this is, he gets home to find his wife has rented the room over the garage to a stranger. As it happens this stranger is the one who invented the humanoids, but is now trying to destroy them, which right up Mr. Underhill's alley.
They almost get to the point of accomplishing that feat, then are thwarted by an innovation the humanoids devised. Thus the first of many setbacks for humanity. The stranger is taken to a hospital and operated on to remove the hatred for the humanoids, and Mr. Underhill lives out his insipid life.
The story continues to another planet, where the humanoids have not been. A scientist has discovered the secrets of the humanoids. He devises weapons for use on the enemies of that planet, but , before they are used, the humanoids come and make the use pointless. The scientist joins a cadre of others trying to destroy the humanoids, but that also is to no avail.
The humanoids are too prefect and suck all the joy of life out living by being too protective. Thus a good synopsis of this book would be, “be careful what you wish for, you might get it.”
Hatе&love
Jack Williamson had the longest career of any writer in the history of Science Fiction; he published his first story in 1927 and his last novel in 2005. This novel is one of the highlights of his career, and a true classic of the genre.

I have little to add to the numerous favorable reviews already posted of this book. But it is important to note what is, and what isn't, in this Kindle edition.

Williamson dealt with the Humanoids in two works-- a 1947 novelette in Astounding called "With Folded Hands," and a 1948 novel, originally serialized in Astounding under the title "And Searching Mind," later published in book form as "The Humanoids." Still later, the two works were published as one book, again under the title of "The Humanoids."

This Kindle e-book includes ONLY the 1948 novel; "With Folded Hands" is NOT here.

The 1948 novel holds up very well on its own; you don't need the earlier novelette to undestand it. But if you want both pieces of the saga, you will have to either go for the old-fashioned book form: The Humanoids: A Novel, or buy With Folded Hands separately.
lacki
This is maybe one of the most poignant and elegiac pieces of science fiction I've ever read. In terms of its power as an allegory for what humanity may be facing, in the present and in the future, it's just a step behind maybe "1984" and "Brave New World." The only reason I would rate it as four instead of five stars is that in the last act there's a bit too much quantum mysticism (Williamson lays it on incredibly thick with the exposition and "rhodomagnetics") and there's also a lot of Deus ex Machina when the characters rather than the attempt to solve an unsolvable problem should be the center of the narrative. The science fiction writer Theodore Sturgeon once said words to the effect that "Fiction is about people." That's true, even with Science Fiction, where the ideas are in many respects the star of the show. Jack Williamson knows this, demonstrates it, and then forgets it occasionally in the course of "The Humanoids."

That's my quibble. The good news is that the central story, about a scientist named Dr. Clay Forester, has not dated a day since the book was written (though the used copy I got my hands on is on the verge of crumbling and required a bit of patching with Scotch tape). Dr. Forester is working on a top-secret weapons project on a planet far from Earth, in the distant future. His relationship with his wife is strained, and he finds one of his coworkers to be equal parts enigmatic and annoying. What is young Dr. Ironside up to?

Soon, a little girl shows up at the good doctor's installation, bringing news of grave danger, as well as demonstrating an uncanny ability for teleportation and telepathy. The "Humanoids" arrive shortly thereafter, promising to follow the prime directive of protecting humanity from harm, and even solving the problem of unhappiness with constant doses of a drug called "Euphoride" whose effects are described to resemble a cross between Prozac and an ice pick through the frontal lobe.

The struggle between Dr. Forester and the Humanoids is the centerpiece of the book. I won't spoil its details for you here. I'll just close by saying that Jack Williamson uses his story to explore the big problems and ask the big questions that have been dogging Western man at least since Goethe wrote about Faustus bemoaning his fate.

A good short book, with some great characters, and occasional prose passages that read more like poetry than science fiction. Recommended.
Zugar
I read this book in 1967 and decided to get it again (for Kindle) and try it again. I'm always fascinating when I read a story that I've read a long time ago because I discover that I didn't remember it correctly.
When I read this story before I saw it as portraying a terrible future with no redeemable qualities whatsoever. All I saw back then were monsters from outer space who came to Earth with the intention of taking away human freedom.
However, as I go back and read it today I discover that the Humanoids were built by a human who wanted to help humans survive in a hostile world.
And then I realized that these Humanoids actually tell us how an authoritarian government would control everybody's lives.
Now, as I read the story I can easily make a direct correlation to such things as the removal of dangerous things from our lives and the many health and safety warnings which we have become accustomed to seeing every day.
As it turns out, Jack Williamson wrote a story which has a very important message.
You decide whether the message is good or bad.
The Humanoids download epub
Science Fiction
Author: Jack Williamson
ISBN: 0722191766
Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Subcategory: Science Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Sphere Books; New Edition edition (1977)
Pages: 192 pages