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The Child Garden: A Low Comedy download epub

by Geoff Ryman


Epub Book: 1461 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1433 kb.

Printed and bound in Great Britain by Cox & Wyman Ltd, Reading. That the future is a faded song, a Royal Rose or a lavender spray. Of wistful regret for those who are not yet here to regre. S. Eliot, Four Quartets.

Printed and bound in Great Britain by Cox & Wyman Ltd, Reading.

The Child Garden is a 1989 science fiction novel by Canadian writer Geoff Ryman. It won both the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award in 1990. The novel is structured as two books with a brief introduction. It won the 1988 BFSA Award and placed 8th in the Locus Poll Award for Best Novella.

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Publisher: Gollancz, London, 2005. In a semi-tropical London, surrounded by paddy-fields, the people feed off the sun, like plants, the young are raised in Child Gardens and educated by viruses, and the Consensus oversees the country, treating non-conformism. Information, culture, law and politics are biological functions. But Milena is different: she is resistant to viruses and an incredible musician, one of the most extraordinary women of her age.

The Child Garden, written in the midst of the initial AIDS onslaught, a book that has as its subtext the then-emerging . Ryman's sense of pacing, at least in the book's first section, is brilliant.

The Child Garden, written in the midst of the initial AIDS onslaught, a book that has as its subtext the then-emerging field of viral genomics. which the author wrestles onto its shoulder with some weird linguistic jiu-jitsu for a two-point takedown, is not to be missed! Ryman's sense of pacing, at least in the book's first section, is brilliant. Unfortunately the work begins to falter afterwards; it's as if his fireworks go dark, and we are left with dry shavings where once magnesium burned so bright

Geoff Ryman is the author of the novels The King's Last Song, Air (a Clarke and Tiptree Award winner), and The Unconquered Country (a World Fantasy Award winner), and the collection Paradise Tales

Geoff Ryman is the author of the novels The King's Last Song, Air (a Clarke and Tiptree Award winner), and The Unconquered Country (a World Fantasy Award winner), and the collection Paradise Tales. Canadian by birth, he has lived in Cambodia and Brazil and now teaches creative writing at the University of Manchester in England. I read the whole thing more out of a sense of just wanting to finish the damn thing, than out of enjoyment. There are some interesting ideas in this book, but it is far too meandering.

Ryman Geoff The Child Garden - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. CHAPTER TWENTY ONE The Third Book (A Low Comedy). 106. About the Author. 109. Настройки: Arial Century Courier Georgia Tahoma Verdana Times New Roman.

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Winner of the Arthur C. Clarke and John W. Campbell Memorial Awards.

"An exuberant celebration of excess set in a resource-poor but defiantly energetic twenty-first century."—The New York Times

"A richly absorbing tale—with a marvelous premise expertly carried out."—Kirkus Reviews

"Excellent. . . . Dark and witty and full of love, closely observed, and sprinkled with astonishing ideas. Science fiction of a very high order."—Greg Bear

"One of the most imaginative accounts of futuristic bioengineering since Greg Bear's Blood Music."—Locus

In a future London, humans photosynthesize, organics have replaced electronics, viruses educate people, and very few live past forty. But Milena is resistant to the viruses. She's alone until she meets Rolfa, a huge, hirsute Genetically Engineered Polar Woman, and Milena realizes she might, just might, be able to find a place for herself after all.

Geoff Ryman is the author of the novels The King's Last Song, Air (a Clarke and Tiptree Award winner), and The Unconquered Country (a World Fantasy Award winner), and the collection Paradise Tales. Canadian by birth, he has lived in Cambodia and Brazil and now teaches creative writing at the University of Manchester in England.


Comments: (7)

Lemana
The Child Garden, written in the midst of the initial AIDS onslaught, a book that has as its subtext the then-emerging field of viral genomics... which the author wrestles onto its shoulder with some weird linguistic jiu-jitsu for a two-point takedown, is not to be missed! Ryman's sense of pacing, at least in the book's first section, is brilliant. Unfortunately the work begins to falter afterwards; it's as if his fireworks go dark, and we are left with dry shavings where once magnesium burned so bright. The development falls apart, and the logical expression of consequences becomes boring, and if never particularly formulaic (Ryman is too clever by half), somewhat confusing.

Lots of fun ideas, too many not explored fully, some followed by the author to an end that baffles the reader (what happened, for example, to the Snide? Why is it important that Milena be Czech? And more that I won't bore you with). Lastly, the conclusion seems completely uncalled for by the book's opening chapters - I sensed that Ryman was writing in a hurry, that his pace of creation outsped his need to review. Why as much as four stars? Because although I was not satisfied with the work as a whole, much of the writing, as writing, was truly excellent.

The current edition is not helped by lazy proofreading: incomprehensible that any typos should exist. Did Ryman read the proofs? One would hope not! Nor would I advise reading Wendy Pearson's introduction - not at least until you have finished the book. Who cares what she thinks? Form your own conclusions before reading hers. After all, the book's an entertainment, and, regardless Pearson, not necessarily a commentary on the world of then, nor is it going to be particularly helpful for you to think it such.
Hidden Winter
Very convoluted like the virus infected brains of the people of earth in this book. Almost a utopian, communist maifesto. I like it but am afraid I will have to read it again. He writes moving, interesting and unique descriptions of a world that has grown young and aimless; with everyone trying to recapture their youth and the dire consequences of manipulating our DNA. I wonder how he feels about GE food? Very thought provoking. Highly recommended.
uspeh
I love this book and read it almost every year. The story is imaginative and paints a vivid picture of the life of what life could be like for modified humans.
Urllet
Takes a while to warm up but is very funny and sad and complex
Siratius
I'm writing this review in response to people who seem to feel Ryman's world of the future is a dystopia. I feel the point of the book is that you're left unsure in this regard. We're told the story from the point of view of an outsider to the system certainly everyone in the system is very nice to her. They are always willing to help even if it sometimes means bending their own laws (Hiding Rolfa) or going far out of their way to do so (as with the previous case or helping Milena in her career). Even the main body of gov't is not a hinderance, but as benevolent as the individuals despite Mileana's mistrust. And it's not as though the people who have gone through the reading are stepford wives either. They are still unique individuals as we see through the affair between Berowne and the Princess. People are just nicer and know more (if not necessarily more intelligent). I do not believe Ryman meant this book to be anti-genetic engineering so much as just showing us how it can change and letting us make up our own minds. As for me I don't see any harm in the possiblity of our world turning into that of this book as it is definately going change in some way. Certainly we are different from the societies before us, so as change must I see no harm in this coming. It's just different not bad.
On the other hand, I would never want to be read myself. I am a very happy well adjusted homosexual and that is something I advocate doesn't need to be fixed. Of course, perhaps I make to much out of orientation, certainly in heaven people won't have any sexual desire at all. And perhaps this means it is something I should not be so worried about giving up on earth despite the knowledge that I won't miss it once I've left it either with death or with being read. I mention this quandary because this and indeed all of Ryman's books (I've actually only read this Was and Lust, but I'm assuming) give rise to constant reveries on my staunchest beliefs. It is for this reason I always think of them as, if not specifically Christian, religious books. Very few authors have the ability to keep me tossing and turning all night from considering what they've written. I think that perhaps C.S. Lewis is the only other. I can't reccomend Ryman well enough and believe those who haven't read him are missing out on something extraordinary.
Saberblade
Geoff Ryman is a genius! I have loved this book for years, and i cannot believe it was written so long ago.
Grari
Good, but a little too abstract. Worth reading though.
This is a truly wonderful book, that deserves a lot more attention than it got. Ryman has an incredible range, a gift for characterization, and has mastered the art for precise observation that he can nevertheless make iconic. This book is very ambitious - and he gets away with it. He weaves together Marx, the theory of relativity, hologram productions of Dante, vampires, and genetic engineering - and it works. This is one of those books that I press into my friends' hands saying, "You have got to read this." Then I have to show up at their door to get it back because they love it so much that they don't want to give it back. If you like this book you should also read "Was," Ryman's book that tackles "The Wizard of Oz." He is a truly great modern writer.
The Child Garden: A Low Comedy download epub
Science Fiction
Author: Geoff Ryman
ISBN: 1931520283
Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Subcategory: Science Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Small Beer Press; Reprint edition (May 24, 2011)
Pages: 388 pages