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Blade Runner: A Movie download epub

by William Burroughs


Epub Book: 1206 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1748 kb.

Blade Runner (a movie) is a science fiction novella by Beat Generation author William S. Burroughs, first published in 1979. The novella began as a story treatment for a proposed film adaptation of Alan E. Nourse's novel The Bladerunner.

Blade Runner (a movie) is a science fiction novella by Beat Generation author William S. Burroughs' treatment is set in the early 21st century and involves mutated viruses and "a medical-care apocalypse"

If these things were to happen to you, the experience might not be unlike reading William S. Burroughs deranged adaptation, Blade Runner: A Movie.

If these things were to happen to you, the experience might not be unlike reading William S.

The book, "Blade Runner: A Movie" by William S Burroughs is essentially Burroughs attempt to rewrite Nourse's book into a form from which a movie could be made

The book, "Blade Runner: A Movie" by William S Burroughs is essentially Burroughs attempt to rewrite Nourse's book into a form from which a movie could be made

Blade Runner (a movie), a 1979 treatment by William S. Burroughs, of the novel The Bladerunner by Alan E. The title was bought by Michael Deeley, producer of the movie then called Dangerous Days, and renamed it Blade.

Blade Runner (a movie), a 1979 treatment by William S. The title was bought by Michael Deeley, producer of the movie then called Dangerous Days, and renamed it Blade Runner. Samuel Beckett Beat Generation Famous Books Blade Runner Fantasy Books Out Of This World Book Authors Great Books Book Worms.

Blade Runner is a science fiction novella by Beat Generation author William S. See Junk for the book of similar title by Melvin Burgess. Junkie: Confessions of an Unredeemed Drug Addict is a novel by American beat generation writer William S. Burroughs, published initially under the pseudonym William Lee in 1953.

19 November at 06:48 ·. "Blade Runner: A Movie was written by William . "Blade Runner: A Movie was written by William Burroughs – yes, the godfather of the Beats, author of Junky and Naked Lunch and The Soft Machine – and published in 1979. It’s fair to say it’s one of Burroughs’ more obscure titles, but to celebrate its 40th anniversary, it’s back in print this month. Ever heard of Blade Runner: A Movie? No, not that one. There’s Ridley Scott’s film. There’s the Philip K Dick’s book it was based on. And then there is William Burroughs’ forgotten vella.

Blade Runner: A Movie is a science fiction screenplay by William S. Burroughs. Not to be confused with Ridley Scott's movie Blade Runner

Blade Runner: A Movie is a science fiction screenplay by William S. It was released in 1979. Not to be confused with Ridley Scott's movie Blade Runner.

Even in the movie, blade runner is a slick but random name for .

Even in the movie, blade runner is a slick but random name for mercenaries who hunt replicants. But it isn’t meaningless. Burroughs’ Blade Runner focuses less on medical theory than on the culturally transgressive potential of bladerunners. Health care isn’t rationed just because of a wrong-headed scientific analysis, but because it’s a chance to rid society of anyone who’s black, gay, or otherwise undesirable. So Blade Runner: A Movie became one of Burroughs’ most obscure written works, with the movie descriptor serving mostly to distinguish it from Nourse’s book. The only true ‘Blade Runner’ adaptation is about militant feminists brainwashing Bill Paxton.

Blade Runner: A Movie. William S. Burroughs outlines the coming medical-care apocalypse: a Dante-esque horror show brought to a boil by a mutated virus and right-wing politics, set in a future all too near.


Comments: (5)

Agalas
After reading the other reviews, I thought I would answer some of the questions that occur from reading the amazon blurb and the reviews. This is not a review of the book; it is an attempt to help you understand what happened between 3 different books - all of which are titled Blade Runner.

Alan E. Nourse wrote the original book titled "The Bladerunner". (IMPORTANT - note the difference in the titles. One has a "space" between "Blade Runner", the other title "The Bladerunner" does not have a "space".) It is totally a different book and plot from the Philip K Dick novel originally titled "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?". The plot is as described above or on the amazon page regarding the original Alan E Nourse book. When the movie (Blade Runner) was made, the directors/producers changed the name from "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" to Blade Runner. This is because the movie "Blade Runner" left out or edited out the aspects of the story that gave the original title it's meaning and pertinence. (If you have read the original Philip K Dick story you know what I mean.) I think if you watch the credits closely you will see that Alan E Nourse is given credit for the title. I don't know if they bought the title from him or not.

The book, "Blade Runner: A Movie" by William S Burroughs is essentially Burroughs attempt to rewrite Nourse's book into a form from which a movie could be made.

Here is what Wikipedia says regarding this issue: "His novel (meaning Nourse) The Bladerunner lent its name to the Blade Runner movie, but no other aspects of its plot or characters, which were taken from Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? In the late 1970s an attempt to adapt The Bladerunner for the screen was made, with Beat Generation author William S. Burroughs commissioned to write a story treatment; no film was ever developed but the story treatment was later published as the novella, Blade Runner (a movie)." The first sentence of this quote is a poorly written sentence. The author of the wikipedia article was trying to say that ONLY the title "Blade Runner" was borrowed from Nourse. Everything else in the movie is stricly from the Philip K Dick novel.

I have not read the Burroughs version yet. I will be buying it just to round out my "collection" of items regarding an interesting story of scifi history. I greatly enjoy other William Burroughs books but suspect I won't be happy with this "interpretation" for movie making purposes. I gave it 3 stars just to give it the benefit of the doubt.
Vizil
This very short book will disappoint all but the most blindly fanatical Burroughs fans. A series of sketches inspired by the Nourse novel of the same name, it simply repeats well-worn themes dealt with more effectively elsewhere in his work. It seems to be the collected results of an aborted attempt to write a novel or screenplay, and from these insipid, lifeless scenes it is easy to see why it was aborted. The only question is: why display the lifeless corpse to the reading public? Methinks his manager was behind this unwise decision$$$

For completists only.
Kearanny
If you're looking for a connection to Ridley Scott's brilliant 1981 film release, you won't have it here. The only real connection is the title itself. It strikes me that someone creative and well-read in the Blade Runner film development came upon a phrase which just wouldn't let go, and that's how we got the term for the film. But wait, this was the term in Philip K. Dick's original book--so who knows which came first... Burroughs' description here and that in the film are similar in their urban and societal context, but that's about where they end.

Reading this book, it strikes me that the producers of Escape from New York read this novel, and took an awful lot of creative vision away from it. This is especially true of the descriptions of a decrepit and decaying New York City, walled, populated by the dead, dying, and murdering, and where entire cultures flourish hundreds of feet above in the dead skyscrapers.

Written in late 70s, published first in 1979. Set in 1999, or maybe 2014, or maybe 1984, or maybe any number of time citations Burroughs coughs up.

Basically it's a futuristic nightmare, a technological hell in which the state has taken over all aspects of life, bureaucracy dictates every waking moment, and the medical institution is the vilest, most corrupt, most bloodthirsty, and most reckless of them all. Underground and legit drugs, as well as designer plagues all vie in the marketplace. Genetics are manipulated and diseases are voluntarily contracted for the material and physiological benefits the accrue.

Inside this hell the blade runner is central. "Essential to underground medicine are the blade runners, who transfer the actual drugs, instruments and equipment from the suppliers to the clients and doctors and underground clinics." The second half of the book, all two-dozen-odd pages of it follows Billy and his mates, blade runners all, as they fight their way through life on the street.

If you're a Burroughs fan, you've seen it all before in Cities of the Red Night and The Place of Dead Roads. Nothing exotic or new or surprising here. This is a good addition to complete your Burroughs library, but not much more.
Mopimicr
Not having read the novel upon which this screenplay was based, I can't make any comparisons so my comments deal only with this book. The beginning third of the book is well written with some amazing foresight. It deals with the background of the "screenplay"; medical care for the haves and the have nots; the lack of adequate medical coverage, national health policies, rampant drug abuse and socialized medicine. Pretty good stuff all in all. Then...the "screenplay" starts. This part of the book was without question the worst bit of contrived garbage I have ever read! I can only assume Burroughs wrote this last bit using his cut-up technique as it ridiculously put together, doesn't flow and he could not help but inject himself in the story. (It opens with the reader finding out the protagonist,Billy, is homosexual which has NOTHING to do with the rest of the story); hence completely irrelevant.;

This book was a waste of time and money. Buy this book only if you feel you might run out of toilet paper.
Blade Runner: A Movie download epub
Science Fiction
Author: William Burroughs
ISBN: 0912652470
Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Subcategory: Science Fiction
Publisher: Blue Wind Pr (June 1979)