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Lost Worlds of 2001 download epub

by Arthur C. Clarke


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Home Arthur C. Clarke The Lost Worlds of 2001. By. Arthur C. Clarke. BLAST OFF! "Between the first and last decades of the Twentieth Century lay a gulf greater than the wildest imagination could have conceived.

Home Arthur C. The lost worlds of 2001, . But above all, it was the gulf between the first hundred-foot flight at Kitty Hawk, and the first billion mile mission to the moons of Jupiter.

The Lost Worlds of 2001 is a 1972 book by English writer Arthur C. Clarke, published as an accompaniment to the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey

The Lost Worlds of 2001 is a 1972 book by English writer Arthur C. Clarke, published as an accompaniment to the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey. The book consists in part of behind-the-scenes notes from Clarke concerning scriptwriting (and rewriting), as well as production issues. The core of the book, however, comprises excerpts from the proto-novel and an early screenplay that did not make it into the final version.

by Arthur Charles Clarke. So began the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey when it was published in July 1968. Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. Since the dawn of time, roughly a hundred billion human beings have walked the planet Earth. But the first version, four years earlier, had started like thi. .View from the year 2000.

Reading Lost Worlds in 2018 I was surprised by how much of the original book/film I had forgotten but also how much I enjoyed this alternate, if more talky, version. Clarke’s writing voice is as clear as ever, with that sense of humour and deprecation not expected from someone nicknamed ‘The Ego’.

Clarke records the development of the story which became 2001: A Space Odyssey, documenting his .

Clarke records the development of the story which became 2001: A Space Odyssey, documenting his work with Stanley Kubrick in the creation of the classic film.

Книга жанра: Фантастика, Научная фантастика. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. Between the first and last decades of the twentieth century lay a gulf greater than the wildest imagination could.

This was the beginning of the first version of 2001-the version that never was published. Now at last you can go that first great voyage. a trip far different than that of 2001. an adventure in many ways even stranger and more fascinating. as you move through time and space toward the extraordinary revelation that awaits you in-. THE LOST WORLDS OF 2001 ARTHUR C. CLARKE A SIGNET BOOK from NEW AMERICAN LIBRARY TIMES MIRROR. Sorry to interrupt the festivities, but we have a problem. HAL 9000, during Frank Poole's birthday party).

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke CBE FRAS (16 December 1917 – 19 March .

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke CBE FRAS (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British science fiction writer, science writer and futurist, inventor, undersea explorer, and television series host. Sir. Clarke later complained that this had the effect of making the book into a novelisation, and that Kubrick had manipulated circumstances to downplay Clarke's authorship. For these and other reasons, the details of the story differ slightly from the book to the movie. The film contains little explanation for the events taking place.

The Lost Worlds of 2001. Author: Arthur Clarke. BLAST OFF! Between the first and last decades of the Twentieth Century lay a gulf greater than the wildest imagination could have conceived. But above all, it was the gulf between the first hundred-foot flight at Kitty Hawk, and the first billion.

The Lost Worlds of 2001 by Arthur C. Clarke was published in 1972 by Signet as an accompaniment to the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey. The book itself consists in part of behind-the-scenes notes from Clarke concerning scriptwriting (and rewriting), as well as production issues. The core of the book, however, is contained in excerpts from the proto-novel and an early screenplay that did not make it into the final version. Alternative settings for launch preparation, the EVA scene where astronaut Frank Poole is lost, and varying dialogues concerning the HAL 9000 unit are all featured in the book

The ultimate trip began with a story called THE SENTINAL, by Arthur C. Clarke. It took flight when stanley Kubrick asked Clarke to write a novel of space exploration unpon which the acclaimed director would base a movie. The result was one of the most extraordinary films of all time. Now for the first time the reader is taken on every stage of this great adventure. Here is the original story. Here are the different versions of 2001 as they evolved in the interplay between two brilliantly charged imaginations. And here is Clarke's own intimate account of the unique chemistyr between author and director which created--2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY.

Comments: (7)

Ranenast
A fun look at the making of "2001: A Space Odyssey," from it's initial conception through the filmmaking process. Some of the early drafts Clarke reprints here are interesting and, personally, I'm glad he chose to avoid some of the descriptions of what Bowman saw when he entered the Stargate. Though they make for good science-fiction, they would have been difficult to film in the 1960s, possibly to the detriment of the film, and, with increased scientific understanding, these scenes would have become ever-more ridiculous. A nice little volume for fans of the series and fans of Clarke's writing.
Lanin
Sadly, this book is no longer in print, but can still be found in the used book section.

The book provides interesting background information on all the characters (Moon-Watcher, Drs. Floyd, Bowman, Poole, etc.) and a fascinating insight into the evolution of the story that ultimately made its way into Stanley Kubrick's movie. I'm glad some of the early ideas never made it to the screen, particulary the scenes involving the "visitors", but I would have welcome a deeper character development such as being provided in this book. In the movie, the only character really developed is the HAL-9000 on-board computer, thus turning space travel into a very cold and inhuman experience. Exactly the opposite of what space travel really is.

Also included in the book are some comments from Arthur C. Clarke that already carry the sour taste of the early end of the Apollo program, and the feeling that America's space program may be left adrift now that the Moon has been reached. Other comments he makes are definitely contemporary to the 1970s and, in retrospect, a bit naive.

A fascinating aspect is to realize how breathtaking and far-reaching the digital revolution has been and the fact that the world of "2001, A Space Odyssey", as described by Clarke and Kubrick, is well off the mark in some respect (though not all).

Finally, as a spacecraft configuation and sizing engineer, I can't help but look at the book and the movie as both a guiding light and infinite source of inspiration in our effort towards what I hope, in the near future, will one day be a space-faring civilization.
Levaq
Multiple drafts, notes and some behind the scenes from the story that was the constantly evolving 2001. But you should read the book first to get some idea how these fragments relate to the finished product.
godlike
This was an interesting read. I saw the film in my early childhood, and heard about the book later. I wanted to read it, but it was out of print; so kudos to Amazon for keeping it alive. The book details the relationship between Clarke and Kubrick during the making of the film, and presents different "versions" of the film, as written by Clarke. Kubrick ultimately made the film he wanted to make, and that's a good thing; but Clarke's genius (and hard work) show through in this testament to what might have been. A good read for anyone interested in learning about how this (and any other) film ultimately became a reality.
Whitehammer
I misunderstood the nature of this book. I thought it was going to be more a day to day journal of the collaboration between Kubrick and Clarke. We only get a few brief chapters of this. The rest are discarded chapters of the book in progress. In theory it should have been fascinating to see scenes and ideas that never made it to the screen but upon reading the material it is easy to understand why they were discarded....THEY WERE BAD. I have only read a handful of Arthur C. Clarke novels but have come to the conclusion that he is a poor writer. He seems more in love the scientific details than in his human characters. They are flat, dull, and one dimensional and speak equally wooden dialogue. Clarke writes likes someone who wrote scientific textbooks and then descided to give fiction a shot. I would rank his novel 3001 as one of the worst I have ever read. The only vaguely interesting moments were of the original computer who was a famale named Athena before becoming HAL 9000, but I already knew this before opening the book. Nothing of a evalavatory nature is revealed. It does illustrate how astranged the medium of cinema and novels are to one another. The greatness of the film is that is multi-interpretational whereas the novel feels the need to make things more concrete and literal---but only in the case of Clarke's novel which is also very very dull reading. If one is interested in the film the book will have a mild interest but Kubrick's vision will be forever the superior of the two.
Lost Worlds of 2001 download epub
Science Fiction
Author: Arthur C. Clarke
ISBN: 0283979046
Category: Science Fiction & Fantasy
Subcategory: Science Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Sidgwick & Jackson Ltd; First Edition edition (September 21, 1972)
Pages: 240 pages