» » The Birth of Time: How Astronomers Measured the Age of the Universe

The Birth of Time: How Astronomers Measured the Age of the Universe download epub

by John Gribbin


Epub Book: 1668 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1813 kb.

How can we measure the age of the universe? Renowned astronomer Gribbin answers this question. The Big Bang Theory was first considered seriously in the 1940s. The Birth of Time is a 200-page detailed look at how this remarkable story unfolded

How can we measure the age of the universe? Renowned astronomer Gribbin answers this question. - Publishers Weekly. The Birth of Time is a 200-page detailed look at how this remarkable story unfolded. Gribbin writes well and his explanations are quite lucid. We learn not only about major breakthroughs, but we also explore blind alleys and dead ends.

The Birth of Time book.

John Gribbin graduated with his bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Sussex in 1966. 2001) The Birth of Time: How Astronomers Measured the Age of the Universe, Yale University Press

John Gribbin graduated with his bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Sussex in 1966. Gribbin then earned his master of science (MSc) degree in astronomy in 1967, also from the Univ  . ISBN 978-0-300-08914-1). 2015) 1. : The Quest to Find the True Age of the Universe and the Theory of Everything, Icon Books, ISBN 978-1-84831-918-9.

The age of the universe has been one of the great scientific mysteries of our time. I only discovered I had this book on my bookshelf immediately after completing Gibbin's book. I had been mislead by its title (which is applling) and had not bothered to open it.

Gribbin, John R. Publication date. Cosmochronology, Cosmology, Cosmography, Space and time, Cosmochronology, Cosmology, Heelal, Oerexplosie. London : Weidenfeld & Nicolson. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on June 8, 2015.

Do you want to read the rest of this article?

Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

How can we measure the age of the universe? Renowned astronomer Gribbin answers this question by describing both the early guesswork and later refinements that finally converged on an answer

How can we measure the age of the universe? Renowned astronomer Gribbin answers this question by describing both the early guesswork and later refinements that finally converged on an answer. Written clearly and concisely for the general reader, yet nevertheless manages to educate on a wide range of topics in physics.

The Birth of Time How Astronomers Measure the Age of the Universe John Gribbin.

The age of the universe has been one of the great scientific mysteries of our time. This engrossing book tells the story of how the mystery was recently solved. Written by a brilliant science writer who was involved, as a research astronomer, in the final breakthrough, the book provides details of the ongoing controversies among scientists as they groped their way to the truth—that the universe is between 13 and 16 billion years old, older by at least one billion years than the star systems it contains.In clear, engaging language, Gribbin takes us through the history of cosmological discoveries, focusing in particular on the seventy years since the Big Bang model of the origin of the universe. He explains how conflicting views of the age of the universe and stars converged in the 1990s because scientists (including Gribbin) were able to use data from the Hubble Space Telescope that measured distances across the universe.

Comments: (7)

Nahelm
Overall. I like the book. It had some short comings, and I get to those, but it did make approachable some of what astronomers do and how they do it. The book is basically a historical narrative of the science of astronomy and cosmology, and how they are continuously striving to answer some basic questions: How old is the Earth and consequently the Universe?; What is the nature of that Universe?
In this regard, the book does very well. It introduces historical figures, what they did, how they did it, who they influenced, and a few interesting side trips to historical oddities that later proved prescient. There are historically significant people, and people significant only to the field in the book. The book however, is not so much about people as the questions asked (fundamentally remaining unchanged), the answers each generation uncovered (constantly changing with new insight and new precision of the fundamental technology), and the politics of the scientific community.
The author makes approachable aspects of the theories of Einstein, Newton, Quantum Mechanics, the inner workings of stars and how this influenced astronomy. This is were the author is strongest.
The weak areas are primarily in the paucity if figures, diagrams, and pictures to highlight and illustrate key techniques, theories, and technologies.
What impressed me the most is how the science of astronomy and cosmology are built on estimates, built on assumptions, tied to just a few laws of nature or knowns. The answers the participants in the field devine from their work is constantly being refined as the estimates and assumptions are better understood or tossed out.
Laitchai
Mr Gribbin explains complex ideas in a way I can quickly understand. I read this book then started it all over again for the pure enjoyment of the experience. I intend to find more of his works!
Ventelone
The author is not up to his usual organized style. He wanders badly and one keeps waiting for the punch line, which never really comes. A waste of time.
Honeirsil
Questions about the age of the universe are tightly coupled to understanding the size and structure of the universe. John Gribbin, a research astronomer as well as a popular writer, tells the story of how astronomers and physicists gradually recognized that the universe was both very large and very old.
We all know today that the universe is immense, that the Milky Way is one of many galaxies, the age of the universe is measured in billions of years, and it began with a big bang. This fundamental understanding is actually quite new. In 1920 the scientific community was deeply divided over whether the Milky Way was essentially the entire universe or whether other large galaxies existed. The age of the universe was significantly underestimated. The Big Bang Theory was first considered seriously in the 1940s.
The Birth of Time is a 200-page detailed look at how this remarkable story unfolded. Gribbin writes well and his explanations are quite lucid. We learn not only about major breakthroughs, but we also explore blind alleys and dead ends. It is an exciting, intriguing story, one that definitely warrants reading.
Nonetheless, this book has one major drawback. Gribbin fails to use explanatory drawings or graphs. For example, he describes the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram entirely in words. We laboriously read: So in a diagram (a kind of graph) where the brightness of each star (its absolute brightness, after allowing for how far away it is) is plotted against its colour, all hydrogen-burning stars lie along a single band in the diagram, a band which is called the main sequence, running roughly diagonally from top left to bottom right.
Likewise, without any diagrams or graphs, or equations, Gribbin discusses parallax measurements, the redshift-distance relation, Hubble's Constant, gravitational lensing, spectral lines, and the Cepheid period-luminosity relation. (There were eight black and white full page astronomical photos that were indeed helpful.)
I hope John Gribbin updates his work to include recent findings regarding dark matter and dark energy, and the now highly precise age (13.7 billion years) assigned to the universe.
I reviewed the 2000 edition published by Universities Press.
Kearanny
John Gribbin is a treasure. He not only has the ability to explain complex scientific concepts to general readers (like me), but he can also explain the controversies surrounding them in a way that the reader can appreciate what issue caused each alternative to arise and what needs to be resolved between them. This wonderful book takes on the topic the techniques used by astronomers to measure the age of the Universe.

Deciding the age of the Universe is not simple, nor is measuring the motion and distance of stars and galaxies. It is fascinating to read how the present conclusions were derived and the role wonderful technology, such as the Hubble telescope, played in opening new areas of the sky to our understanding.

The book has some black and white pictures that do add to the reading of the book, but there are books with truly amazing images from Hubble that are also available.

I highly recommend this book to everyone.
The Birth of Time: How Astronomers Measured the Age of the Universe download epub
Astronomy & Space Science
Author: John Gribbin
ISBN: 0300089147
Category: Science & Math
Subcategory: Astronomy & Space Science
Language: English
Publisher: Yale University Press, New Haven & London (March 1, 2001)
Pages: 264 pages