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Black holes, quasars & the universe download epub

by Harry L Shipman


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Harry Shipman of the University of Delaware wrote this book on black holes, quasars and other astronomical phenomena before they had become (if you'll forgive the pun) attractive subjects

Harry Shipman of the University of Delaware wrote this book on black holes, quasars and other astronomical phenomena before they had become (if you'll forgive the pun) attractive subjects. One of the stated purposes, from his introduction, is to supplement classical introductions to astronomy - most introductory surveys of astronomy cover these subjects as a matter of course now, but this was not so in the 1970s

Harry Shipman of the University of Delaware wrote this book on black holes, quasars and other astronomical phenomena . Quasars may or may not be related to black holes, just as active galaxies might be fueled by black holes.

Harry Shipman of the University of Delaware wrote this book on black holes, quasars and other astronomical phenomena before they had become (if you'll forgive the pun) attractive subjects. One of the stated purposes, from his introduction, is to supplement classical introductions to astronomy - most introductory surveys of astronomy cover these subjects as a matter of course now, but this was not so in the 1970s. The third section pulls the information together, looking at broader cosmological issues.

Start by marking Black Holes Quasars and the Universe as Want to Read . This is a good book and Shipman has a somewhat unique perspective. But it is too dated and cannot be recommended except perhaps as a historical reference.

Start by marking Black Holes Quasars and the Universe as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. trust me,there were'nt too much equation in this book.

Harry Shipman of the University of Delaware wrote this book on black holes, quasars and other astronomical phenomena . I was pleasantly surprised (after all, it is a technical book) to find it so easy to read and so informative! I have learned so much from this book.

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Houghton Mifflin, 1980 - 344 sivua. Recounts the major astronomical discoveries of our age, detailing the many startling findings of the past twenty years concerning black holes, quasars, pulsars, and other intriguing phenomena. Mitä ihmiset sanovat - Kirjoita arvostelu. Yhtään arvostelua ei löytynyt. Units of measurement.

Shipman, Black Holes, Quasars, and the Universe, 2nd ed. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1980). For details on Cygnus X-1 (and other information about black holes), see Harry L. Shipman, Black Holes, Quasars, and the Universe; George Greenstein, Frozen Star (New York: Freundlich Books, 1983). J. B. Hutchings, D. Crampton, and A. P. Cowley, LMC X-3: A Black Hole in a Neighbor Galaxy, Mercury (July-August 1984): 106–107.


Comments: (5)

Malak
Harry Shipman of the University of Delaware wrote this book on black holes, quasars and other astronomical phenomena before they had become (if you'll forgive the pun) attractive subjects. One of the stated purposes, from his introduction, is to supplement classical introductions to astronomy -- most introductory surveys of astronomy cover these subjects as a matter of course now, but this was not so in the 1970s.
Despite the age of the text and the fact that many discoveries and advances have been made since the original publication date of this book, it still provides an interesting and accessible survey to some of the more interesting objects and topics in astronomy. Shipman designed this book to be a supplement to introductory astronomy texts, a stand-alone volume for those without significant scientific background, and a primer for those who were preparing for more advanced work in the sciences.
The introduction begins with preliminary terminology and definitions, a brief survey of astronomy and the related physics concepts. It also looks at scientific method. This introduction leads to the first primary topic -- black holes. Shipman covers the aspects of gravity, stellar growth and decay, the different kinds of star 'death' (white dwarf, neutron star, pulsar), and devotes several chapters to aspects of the black hole itself. These address the event horizon and changes there, searching for black holes and issues of detection, and future directions in research. Shipman's general descriptions are still very good scientifically.
The second primary section addresses the phenomena of galaxies and quasars. Issues of the expanding universe, distances to quasars, redshift and its causes, different types of galaxies, and observational problems are addressed in the several chapters. Quasars may or may not be related to black holes, just as active galaxies might be fueled by black holes.
The third section pulls the information together, looking at broader cosmological issues. The life cycle of the universe is presented, concentrating primarily on the Big Bang theory. The issues of dating the universe, based on different kinds of observational data, and the large scale structure of the universe from galactic clusters to superclusters are set forth. Issues in the final fate of the universe (total mass, expansion rate changes, etc.) are explored -- this has become a hot topic for cosmology today, too.
Shipman writes in an engaging and interesting style, and sets forth complicated issues in easy-to-grasp ways. This was one of the earliest books of astronomy I read, and I still refer to it on a frequent basis.
Tansino
I used this book in an honors seminar that I taught several years ago on "The Physics and Philosophy of Time." ([...]) We read Hawking's "Brief History" and several chapters from this book. The students were honors students, of course, but not necessarily science majors - there were business majors, etc. So this book is readable by those without a college science education. It's not easy, you'll have to work, but definitely worth the struggle.

First of all, Shipman lays out the details of these bizarre stellar objects very lucidly. Most important, he's very clear about what ideas are completely speculative, which ones are probably true, and which others are as close to correct as science can go. His Chapter 6, for example, laying out all the crazy ideas of white holes, wormholes, etc, is a very sober account.

You don't need any physics or math background, but if you are a critical thinker, this is an excellent introduction to the physics of black holes.
Connorise
This is a good book and Shipman has a somewhat unique perspective. But it is too dated and cannot be recommended except perhaps as a historical reference.
Anarius
Try another book that goes even deeper in only 30 pages.
It's called "Everything About Black Holes" and it explains everything with science. It's on Amazon.
Budar
My girlfriend loves space and loves books with the pictures of everything that's out there very clear and high resolution photos
Black holes, quasars & the universe download epub
Astronomy & Space Science
Author: Harry L Shipman
ISBN: 0395243742
Category: Science & Math
Subcategory: Astronomy & Space Science
Language: English
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin (1976)