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The Concept of Logical Consequence download epub

by John Etchemendy


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The intuitive concept of consequence has driven the study of logic for more than two thousand years. But logic has moved forward dramatically in the past century. The aim of this book is to correct a common misunderstanding of one of the most widely used techniques of mathematical logic.

The aim of this book is to correct a common misunderstanding of one of the most widely used techniques of mathematical logic

The intuitive concept of consequence, the notion that one sentence follows logically from another, has driven the study of logic for more than two thousand years. But logic has moved forward dramatically in the past century - largely as a result of bringing mathematics to bear on the field. Central to the received view is Tarski's model-theoretic analysis of logical consequence, which Etchemendy argues is fundamentally mistaken.

John Etchemendy received his bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Nevada, Reno before earning his PhD in. .

John Etchemendy received his bachelor's and master's degrees at the University of Nevada, Reno before earning his PhD in philosophy at Stanford in 1982. He has been a faculty member in Stanford's Department of Philosophy since 1983, prior to which he was a faculty member in the Philosophy Department at Princeton University. His most well-known book, The Concept of Logical Consequence (1990, 1999), criticizes Alfred Tarski's widely accepted analysis of logical consequence.

In John Etchemendy's book, The Concept of Logical Consequence, several arguments are put . In his classic 1936 essay On the Concept of Logical Consequence, Alfred Tarski used the notion of satisfaction to give a semantic characterization of the logical properties

I argue in this article that crucial parts of Etchemendy's attack depend on a failure to distinguish two senses of logic and two correlative senses of being something a logical question. In his classic 1936 essay On the Concept of Logical Consequence, Alfred Tarski used the notion of satisfaction to give a semantic characterization of the logical properties.

Central to the received view is Tarski's model-theoretic analysis of logical consequence, which Etchemendy argues is fundamentally mistaken

The intuitive concept of consequence, the notion that one sentence follows logically from another, has driven the study of logic for more than two thousand years. But logic has moved forward dramatically in the past century-largely as a result of bringing mathematics to bear on the field. Save indirectly, by those who question classical principles, this standard analysis has gone unchallenged for half a century, with the result that it has come to seem a piece of common knowledge.

Central to the received view is Tarski's model-theoretic analysis of logical consequence, which Etchemendy argues is fundamentally mistaken. Etchemendy's critique will shatter the complacency. Format Paperback 176 pages.

Personal Name: Etchemendy, John, 1952-. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge, Mass. Download book The concept of logical consequence, John Etchemendy. Harvard University Press, (c)1990.

In John Etchemendy's book, The Concept of Logical Consequence, several arguments are put forth against the .

I argue in this article that crucial parts of Etchemendy's attack depend on a failure to distinguish two senses of logic and two correlative senses of being something a logical question.

Tokens of Meaning Cleo Condoravdi. The Concept of Logical Consequence. 1. Introduction 2. Representational Semantics 3. Tarski on Logical Truth 4. Interpretational Semantics 5. Interpreting Quantifiers 6. Modality and Consequence 7. The Reduction Principle 8. Substantive Generalizations 9. The Myth of the Logical Constant 10. Logic from the Metatheory 11. Completeness and Soundness 12.

The intuitive concept of consequence, the notion that one sentence follows logically from another, has driven the study of logic for more than two thousand years

The intuitive concept of consequence, the notion that one sentence follows logically from another, has driven the study of logic for more than two thousand years.

The intuitive concept of consequence, the notion that one sentence follows logically from another, has driven the study of logic for more than two thousand years. But logic has moved forward dramatically in the past century - largely as a result of bringing mathematics to bear on the field. The infusion of mathematically precise definitions and techniques has turned a field dominated by homely admonitions into one characterized by illuminating theorems. The aim of this book is to correct a common misunderstanding of one of the most widely used techniques of mathematical logic. Central to the received view is Tarski's model-theoretic analysis of logical consequence, which Etchemendy argues is fundamentally mistaken. Save indirectly, by those who question classical principles, this standard analysis has gone unchallenged for half a century, with the result that it has come to seem a piece of common knowledge. Etchemendy's critique will shatter the complacency.
The Concept of Logical Consequence download epub
Mathematics
Author: John Etchemendy
ISBN: 1575861941
Category: Science & Math
Subcategory: Mathematics
Language: English
Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf (March 1, 1999)
Pages: 176 pages