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An Enormous, Immensely Complicated Intervention: Groundfish, the New England Fishery Management Council, and the World Fisheries Crisis download epub

by Spencer Apollonio,Jacob J. Dykstra


Epub Book: 1155 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1489 kb.

It finds that many of the explanations offered for the New England problems are incorrect or irrelevant or counterproductive.

It finds that many of the explanations offered for the New England problems are incorrect or irrelevant or counterproductive.

by Spencer Apollonio. No current Talk conversations about this book.

An enormously complicated intervention: Groundfish, the New England Fishery Management Council, and the world fishery crisis. Ludwig’s ratchet and the collapse of New England groundfish stocks. Coastal Management 28: 187–213. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Montgomery: E-book Time. Hedström, . and P. Ylikoski. Causal mechanisms in the social sciences. Development and crisis of the welfare state. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

An Enormous, Immensely Complicated Intervention: Groundfish, the New England Fishery Managemen. y Spencer .

This book opens a new frontier for understanding why some fisheries are sustainable. Every resource manager and environmentalist in America should read this book. Richard Wilk, Chair, Anthropology Department, Indiana University).

There is no question that fisheries management is An enormously, immensely complicated intervention, as Spencer Apollonio and Jacob Dykstra write in their new book about the New England Fishery Management Council. Both authors have long experience with the council: Dykstra was involved in creating the council and a member for seven years, while Apollonio is a marine biologist who has worked for a state management organization and the first director of the New England council.

An Enormous, Immensely Complicated Intervention": Groundfish, The New England Fishery Management Council, and the World Fisheries Crisis.

An Enormous, Immensely Complicated Intervention MontgomeryAl. Report submitted to the New England Fishery Management Council. Fishes of the Gulf of Maine Fishery Bulletin of the Fish and Wildlife Service.

In Stock assessment and fishery evaluation report for the groundfish resources of the Gulf of Alaska. North Pacific Fishery Management Council 1999; retrieved from. Gaichas S. Summary of changes in the Bering Sea – Aleutian Islands squid and other species assessment. North Pacific Fishery Management Council 2002; retrieved from. Clark WG, St-Pierre G, Brown ES. Estimates of halibut abundance from NMFS trawl surveys. International Pacific Halibut Commission 1997; Technical Report No. 37, retrieved from.

This book reviews the fisheries of New England - "the poster child of mismanagement" - since 1977. It finds that many of the explanations offered for the New England problems are incorrect or irrelevant or counterproductive. It suggests that the problems lie in two general categories: first, the legislative and administrative context of management; and second and more serious, fundamental issues concerning fishing technologies, and lack of effective effort control strategies and an operational hypothesis of the dynamics of marine ecosystems. These latter issues are not confined to New England, but are inherent in most marine fisheries wherever they may be found. The book suggests a new concept for benign and selective fishing technologies, and it recommends a thorough review and analysis of the efficacy of effort control concepts. It proposes a management strategy based upon the hierarchical concept of ecosystems that could eliminate many of the current problems of management.

Comments: (2)

Tat
There is no question that fisheries management is "An enormously, immensely complicated intervention," as Spencer Apollonio and Jacob Dykstra write in their new book about the New England Fishery Management Council. Both authors have long experience with the council: Dykstra was involved in creating the council and a member for seven years, while Apollonio is a marine biologist who has worked for a state management organization and the first director of the New England council. Their backgrounds are different but they are in agreement that the management system doesn't work and they have written a book that explores why.

Their catchy title phrase comes from one of the best books about fishery management, Industry in Trouble,Industry in Trouble: The Federal Government and the New England Fisheries written by Margaret Dewar in 1983 about the New England fisheries.

They are critical of Maximum Sustained Yield, or MSY, which is at the scientific heart of American fisheries management. They write that it systematically removes large, old, slow-growing fish from a population, leaving a preponderance of young, fast-growing fish. This will allow the population to reach its greatest natural rate of increase, thus providing the maximum sustainable harvest. The difficulty is that such an attenuated population can attain the largest growth rate, but it is not sustainable. The younger fish population may begin to oscillate, shifting the population into "a lower hierarchical level with inherently faster dynamics and greater instability and unpredictability," (200). Multiple year classes lend stability to fish populations, allowing them to withstand disturbances, such as shifts in currents, temperatures, and food supply. Species that are long lived, with delayed maturity, naturally select for a population structure with multiple age classes. MSY, by reducing the number of year classes, works against evolutionary adaptation to the environment.

One of the consequences of this increased instability in species is that stock assessments are markedly expensive, as the authors point out. They do not add that stock assessments can be notoriously inaccurate, especially when dealing with low stock sizes. Management, they write, "becomes ever more complex, burdensome, expensive, and confusing, with an increasing probability of decreasing efficacy," (202).

Their solution is to move to an ecosystem based model, which would simplify the management process, while ensuring the protection of multiple year-classes that give the populations resilience. The author do an admirable job up to this point, but how to get to an eco-system based management process is a little murky. Are we going to write MSY out of American fisheries management? I'm all in favor of that, but as they point out, it is "very probably politically unrealistic" to suppose MSY is going to be abolished anytime soon (223). And I certainly agree that its administrative limitations should be acknowledged (especially to the public, which is constantly told fisheries are managed on the best available science). It would indeed be a useful exercise to think about a management model that could replace it. The thoughts of two individuals who have been so involved in fisheries management for so long would be useful here.

Apollonio and Dykstra believe that fisheries should be managed for sustainability, and this is best achieved by preserving the structure of fish ecosystems. In other words, as British scientist Michael Graham put it in 1943, in The Fish Gate,The Fish Gate. if you protect the fish stocks, you will protect the livelihood of fishermen. "Fisheries that are unlimited become unprofitable."[1]
Shadowredeemer
This is a "must read" for any person involved in Fisheries Management, past, present and future.
The book does a wonderful job of pointing out many existing problems, which if not addressed, will surely lead to future failures in the management plans.
One very important thing was not explained about the relationship between the two authors. Jacob Dykstra and Spencer Apollonio were on opposite sides of the table and when it came to the Fishery Management Plans(FMP) ,and rarely, if ever agreed on any thing at the time. To have both of them collaborate on this book and agree on both the problems the FMP's currently are facing and come up with some ideas to solve them is a major statement.
I had the unique privilege of working for Jacob on board the F/V JANILEEN II as his Mate and Swing Captain from 1981 until I bought his boat in 1986. Spencer Apollonio has been a long time friend of my parents. Because of this, I was hearing Jacob's frustrations that he was feeling at all the meetings he was attending while I was running his boat. I would also hear the "other side" from my father. There seemed to be no simple solutions then as well as now. But there are clearly some things that must be done to insure we will continue to have a viable fishery for generations to come.

Kris Boehmer
An Enormous, Immensely Complicated Intervention: Groundfish, the New England Fishery Management Council, and the World Fisheries Crisis download epub
Nature & Ecology
Author: Spencer Apollonio,Jacob J. Dykstra
ISBN: 1598248332
Category: Science & Math
Subcategory: Nature & Ecology
Language: English
Publisher: E-BookTime, LLC (August 26, 2008)
Pages: 260 pages