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The Next Big Thing Is Really Small: How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business download epub

by Deb Newberry,Jack Uldrich


Epub Book: 1851 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1823 kb.

Uldrich and Newberry compare November 9, 1989, with the day the . Their book-business spin is how these changes will affect YOUR business

Uldrich and Newberry compare November 9, 1989, with the day the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty Hawk. This was the day two IBM scientists coaxed individual atoms to build a structure, the IBM logo. Their book-business spin is how these changes will affect YOUR business.

A Crown business briefings book. Includes bibliographical references (p. -199) and index. Nanotechnology : the next frontier - Interesting : but what do I have to do? -. - Follow the money, follow the leaders - Today : nanotechnology establishes a foothold - 2004 & 2005 : faster, smaller, cheaper, better - 2006-2008 : the avalanche begins - 2009-2013 : taking control - 2013 & beyond : the world becomes smaller and smarter - And in conclusion, this is just the beginning.

Jack Uldrich and Deb Newberry explain exactly how you should prepare for nanotech’s imminent arrival. He is the former deputy director of the Minnesota Office of Strategic and Long-Range Planning.

Jack Uldrich and Deb Newberry explain exactly how you should prepare for nanotech's .

Jack Uldrich and Deb Newberry explain exactly how you should prepare for nanotech's imminent arrival. The watchword is "disruptive," because a new nanoengineered product has the potential for putting present day businesses OUT of business. A grand title such as The Next Big Thing is Really Small: How Nanotechnology will Change the Future of Your Business should ring warning bells.

Is Really Small : How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business. it just means that I can profit even more before the rest of the public catches on that nanotechnology really is the NEXT BI. .

The Next Big Thing Is Really Small : How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business. by Deb Newberry and Jack Uldrich. it just means that I can profit even more before the rest of the public catches on that nanotechnology really is the NEXT BIG THING. Small is big. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 16 years ago. A country with just 8000 cars, 144 miles of paved road, where 95 % of births occur at home, life expectancy is forty-seven years, just 6 % of the population has graduated from high school, pneumonia and influenza are leading causes of death.

Jack Uldrich is a renowned global futurist and the author of 11 books, including the award-winning bestsellers The Next Big Thing Is Really Small: How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business; Jump the Curve: 50 Strategies to Help Your Company Stay Ahead o.

Jack Uldrich is a renowned global futurist and the author of 11 books, including the award-winning bestsellers The Next Big Thing Is Really Small: How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business; Jump the Curve: 50 Strategies to Help Your Company Stay Ahead of Emerging Technology; and Higher Unlearning: 39 Post-Requisite Lessons for Achieving a Successful Future. His most recent book is Foresight 20/20: A Futurist Explores the Trends Transforming Tomorrow.

Bio - Southeastern Louisiana University.

What is the next big thing gonna change in technology? .

What is the next big thing gonna change in technology? How far will medical nanotechnology advance in the next 10-20 years? Will nanotechnology be the most important future technology? What do you think will be the next big technology to come out and when? . How much technological and scientific change will we witness in the next decade? What is the NEXT BIG THING? What do you think will be the next up and coming technology? What nanotechnology is most likely to revolutionize the world?

The Next Big Thing Is Really Small.

The Next Big Thing Is Really Small. How nanotechnology will change the future of your business. Uldrich and Newberry teach readers how to think strategically about nanotechnology and how to apply this newfound knowledge to make wise and profitable investment decisions. Imprint: Cornerstone Digital.

The Next Big Thing Is Really Small: How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business By Jack Uldrich, Deb Newberry; Crown Publishing Group, 2003, ISBN 1400046890. Introductory lay treatment, very useful for understanding day-to-day and business implications. Thicker Than Blood A science fiction thriller set in the near future. It is about the introduction of nanotechnology into contemporary American society. Unbounding the Future: The Nanotechnology Revolution By K. Eric Drexler, Chris Peterson, Gayle Pergamit; William Morrow and Company, In. 1991; Quill (reprint),.

nanotechnology na-no--tek-'nä-l -je- n (1987): the science of manipulating material at the atomic levelAlthough nanotechnology deals with the very small—a nanometer is 1/80,000th the diameter of a human hair—it is going to be huge. From the food we eat, the clothes we wear, and the products we manufacture to the composition of our bodies, everything is made of atoms. And if we can manipulate the atom, then that changes the rules of the game for almost every product.Coal and diamonds, for example, are both constructed from carbon atoms. It’s merely the arrangement of the atoms that differentiates an inexpensive fuel source from a pricey engagement jewel. While the science of nanotech cannot yet transform coal into diamonds, it is advancing rapidly and will begin to radically alter the business world during the next few years—and will continue to do so for the forseeable future. The buzz surrounding nanotech is comparable to that at the dawn of the digital revolution, which changed the face of how business operates. Unlike the Internet, however, which applied new technology to many old processes and businesses, nanotech is about creating entirely new materials, products, and systems (and therefore markets), as well as making existing products faster, stronger, and better.You may be tempted to wait until the buzz dies down before deciding how to integrate nanotech into your business, but don’t make the mistake of thinking of it as being light-years away. Even though it may sound far-off at times, within ten years nanotech will have huge effects on many industries, including manufacturing, health care, energy, agriculture, communications, transportation, and electronics. Within a decade, nanotechnology is expected to be the basis of $1 trillion worth of products in the United States alone and will create anywhere from 800,000 to 2 million new jobs. Nanotechnology will require you to radically re-think what your core business is, who your competitors are, what skills your workforce needs, how to train your employees, and how to think strategically about the future. Jack Uldrich and Deb Newberry explain exactly how you should prepare for nanotech’s imminent arrival. They identify today’s nanotech innovators, chronicle and project the rapid rise of nanotech developments, and show how to think strategically about the field’s opportunities and investments. The Next Big Thing Is Really Small provides a sneak peek at the technology that will transform the next ten years, giving investors and executives a road map for using small wonders to generate big profits.

Comments: (7)

Mikale
Uldrich and Newberry compare November 9, 1989, with the day the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty Hawk. This was the day two IBM scientists coaxed individual atoms to build a structure, the IBM logo.
As a result, nanotechnology, the science of manipulating material at the atomic level, was born.
I had heard Bill Gates talk about many of the advancements mentioned in this book, but I had no idea they were so close. Some of them are being produced already. Embedded nanoparticles are being used to make stain-repellent khakis, for instance. Also, in 2001 Toyota introduced bumpers that are sixty percent lighter and twice as resistant to scratching and denting.
Uldrich and Newberry predict that in ten years Nanotechnology could be a trillion dollar industry. Two companies, Nanosys, Inc. and ZettaCore, are working on constructing computer circuits that will create a 10,000-fold increase in computing power. Some applications could include tiny computers embedded in your clothing to monitor your health. In the health field, nano-sized drugs, because they are undetectable by the body's immune system, can reduce or eliminate side effects.
One of the reasons Ulrich and Newberry are so optimistic is because of the industry jumping that nanotechnology will engender. They use Hostess Twinkies as a hypothesis. R&D for the company may spend money studying vitamin supplements and aroma therapy (to increase taste sensation).
And there's good news for environmentalists. According to a Nationa Science Foundation official, "nanotechnology applications have the potential to save four hundred million gallons of gas annually and emit eleven billion fewer pounds of carbon dioxide into the air."
Remember that anthrax scare? According to Uldrich and Newberry "two separate nanotechnology-related products will be able to render anthrax harmless" by the end of 2003.
Much of what Uldrich and Newberry have to say is aimed at businessmen who may wind up extinct if they don't pay attention to nanotechnology. For instance, titanium dioxide nanoparticles can break down and loosen dirt smudges from materials, leading to such applications as a coating for new cars with self-cleaning nanoparticles. Car washes and gas stations beware!
Even more stunning is Uldrich and Newberry's prediction that within ten years nanotechnology will help cure blindness and hearing loss: "... parts of our bodies that already operate at the nanoscale, such as the retinal cones and rods that allow sight and the stereocilia in the inner ear that allow hearing, can be replicated."
If you're thinking that much of what I've said is "pie-in-the-sky," you should know that the National Science Foundation pegs the "probability of the type of commercial applications covered in this book actually occurring within the next fifteen to twenty years" within the 90 to 100 category.
Via
From the moment I got this book I could not stop reading. It is very simple to read, with very convincing facts of what the next tecnological revolution will bring us. The sooner you read it the best it will be, it has very recent (2002-2003) facts about R&D happening today, the companies & universities developing this technologies. This technologies will change very fast.
I would recomend this book to every business person, entrepreneurs, and young students.
I hope you find it as exciting as I did.
Shakar
I have this book and have let a number of people read it. All have told me and I agree that the book is a great introduction to nanotechnology. The wave of the future is well explained in terms anyone can understand. A very important work from two very knowledgeable people.
Obong
Just took a course ion this topic - extremely interesting. Fun to read some of the further advances that are changing our world.
Ygglune
"Nano-" is a prefix meaning one-billionth (just as "giga-" is a prefix meaning one billion). A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter, and as the authors illustrate on page 24, a nanometer is about ten hydrogen atoms wide while a typical biological cell is thousands of nanometers wide. It is useful to understand that nanotechnology is then about manipulating the very small irrespective of the technological field or science involved.

This is an important point and one the Jack Uldrich and Deb Newberry emphasize throughout this breezy and readable introduction to how nanotechnology is going to change our lives over the next couple of decades. Manipulating the very small, molecule by molecule, and even atom by atom, will prove enormously useful in a wide range of industries, from space exploration and the airline business to the modification of foods to the treatment and prevention of disease. Consequently what this book is about is not only building ultra-turbo'ed computers and superslick surfaces for airplanes and submarines, but about genetically modified foods and stem cell research.

This book just skims the surface of what is going on and gives the reader some idea about where the action is and what is likely to develop in the next few years. Starting in 2003, they project what products and services are likely to be available today (Chapter Five: "2004 & 2005: Faster, Smaller, Cheaper, Better"); a few years from now (Chapter Six: "2006-2008: The Avalanche Begins"); a decade down the road (Chapter Seven: "Taking Control"); and on into the future (Chapter Eight: "2013 & Beyond: The World Becomes Smaller and Smarter").

Their book-business spin is how these changes will affect YOUR business. The watchword is "disruptive," because a new nanoengineered product has the potential for putting present day businesses OUT of business. Just as the internal combustion engine changed the landscape of America, and electricity transformed our world in ways that nobody at the time could reliably predict, the products and services made possible by the manipulation of the very, very small, will (very soon) change the way we live in ways we cannot fully predict--which suggests the question, Which are the horse and buggy businesses of today?

Since this book is aimed at readers interested in the possible impact of the nanoworld on their businesses, the authors suggest how many advances will play out: First, the military or the space program or a large corporation will develop at high cost the new technology. Then, as the technology is seen to work, it will spread to "very high-end niches" such as in sports and recreation (yacht racing and mountain climbing, for example) where people are ready to pay a high price for just a little improvement. From there the technology will be taken up by "high-end markets" (fancy cars, expensive cosmetics, etc.) and from there as the price continues to fall "to everyday products (e.g., kitchen appliances, bikes, and toys)..." and so on. (p. 166)

Conservative people the world over are understandably upset at some of the prospects. By manipulating individual biological cells and their attendant chemistry, we might be able to grow new limbs and organs for our bodies, possibly including a whole new YOU. Food products will be modified to include imbedded vitamins and pesticides (this is already being done), but also medicines and even contraceptives. We will be able to wear or have implanted in our bodies super-fast computers. Indeed, it may happen that we will become the cyborgs of science fiction, making it hard to tell where our genetic biology ends and our enhanced body begins. We may in fact cross over some unmarked threshold and become something other than human.

While the authors are not looking this far ahead, it is interesting to note that Chapter Seven is subtitled "Taking Control." The irony here is that with identity tags ("nanosensors") imbedded in every product (and possibly into EVERYBODY) we ourselves will not be taking control. Rather the technology will be taking control of us. Remember that biological evolution on this once lifeless planet began with chemistry, and now the products of that chemistry (us) are reaching out to control the planet. Might not our technology some day control us?

Oh, Brave New World,/ That has such things in it!--to paraphrase Shakespeare (from The Tempest).

In the final chapter the authors do address the ethical, philosophical and social aspects of nanotechnology-enabled advances in our lives and warn that many people will be against them (indeed many people already are against them). It will not be a case of a technology taking off smoothly. Whether the best technique or product wins out in the marketplace (as the Qwerty keyboard, VHS technology, and Microsoft showed us) may depend on how resistant people are to change, how intrenched one technology is, and how the politics play out. The brave new world of nanotechnology will transform the planet, no question about that, but when and how is, as the authors advise, entirely unclear.

Nonetheless the authors emphasize the positive aspects of the great changes to come. They see nanotechnology giving us cheaper energy, solving our fresh water and pollution problems, enabling us to live longer and better lives, etc. Personally I welcome the excitement and change to come, and I envy those younger than I who will see a lot more of it.
The Next Big Thing Is Really Small: How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business download epub
Technology
Author: Deb Newberry,Jack Uldrich
ISBN: 1400046890
Category: Science & Math
Subcategory: Technology
Language: English
Publisher: Crown Business; 1 edition (March 11, 2003)
Pages: 208 pages