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You're Missin' a Great Game: From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back download epub

by Whitey Herzog,Jonathan Pitts


Epub Book: 1547 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1359 kb.

You're Missin' a Great Game book.

You're Missin' a Great Game book. He blames both the owners and union rep Donald Fehr for this escalation.

You're Missin' A Great Game. You're Missin' a Great Game From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back. Whitey Herzog examines why his baseball heroes - Casey Stengel, Ted Williams, Tom Seaver, and Ozzie Smith, for starters - are just that, and why the game needs more of them. Baseball itself is a little nearsighted right now," he complains, "and there ain't any harm in riding it some. Maybe we can be the bench jockeys. Herzog didn't earn his nickname as baseball's White Rat simply because of his hair color. From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back

You're Missin' a Great Game. From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back. By Whitey Herzog and Jonathan Pitts. Or you're standing on second base in practice, minding your own business, maybe thinking just how wonderful it is that you got there in the first place, and suddenly he's behind you: "You're important to me, young fella; you're half a ru. One day he comes up to me, jabs me with a finger and says, "I'm gonna tell you one thing; never worry about gettin' fired, 'cause if you don't own the ballclub or die on the job, it's gonna happen. He was talking about managing.

You're Missin' a Great Game : From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back.

You're Missin' a Great Game From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back. At its best, baseball calls on a wide array of subtle skills, rewarding the teams that know how to play the game better than their opponents over the long 162-game season. Whitey Herzog learned those skills under the tutelage of Cesey Stengel in the Yankees' training camps of the 1950s: how to take a lead; which side of the cutoff man to aim for; when to take an extra base depending on whether the outfielder throws left-handed or right-handed; the best ways to turn or prevent a double play.

You're Missin' a Great Game: From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back. The former crowd-pleasing manager known as the White Rat gives away plenty of trade secrets as he surveys his half-century in major league baseball. He also offers up some frank advice for rejuvenating the sport. 'What makes the book work is that Herzog wants to talk about the things that people don't like to talk about,'' Bill James said here last year

At its best, baseball calls on a wide array of subtle skills, rewarding the teams that know how to play the game better than their opponents over the long 162-game . product description page. You're Missin' a Great Game - by Whitey Herzog & Jonathan Pitts (Paperback)

At its best, baseball calls on a wide array of subtle skills, rewarding the teams that know how to play the game better than their opponents over the long 162-game season. You're Missin' a Great Game - by Whitey Herzog & Jonathan Pitts (Paperback).

No one knows the game better than Whitey Herzog, the man who gave us "Whiteyball" - the fast, aggressive style of play for which his teams were known

No one knows the game better than Whitey Herzog, the man who gave us "Whiteyball" - the fast, aggressive style of play for which his teams were known. Although he is no longer building championship ball dubs, the game is still in his blood, as it was throughout a career that took him to every level of baseball, on and off the field. In You're Missin' a Great Game, Whitey decries the state of the game, which has lost its way in the pursuit of power and Sports Center thrills.

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At its best, baseball calls on a wide array of subtle skills, rewarding the teams that know how to play the game better than their opponents over the long 162-game season. Whitey Herzog learned those skills under the tutelage of Cesey Stengel in the Yankees' training camps of the 1950s: how to take a lead; which side of the cutoff man to aim for; when to take an extra base depending on whether the outfielder throws left-handed or right-handed; the best ways to turn or prevent a double play. These little things might make a difference in two or three games over the course of a season, but two or three wins are often what separates a pennant winner from the pack. As Whitey would personally learn playing alongside greats like Roger Maris and Yogi Berra -- and managing players like George Brett, Darrell Porter, and Ozzie Smith -- baseball should reward such attention to detail. That inside knowledge can create the chance for a less physically awesome team to beat its imposing adversaries -- and what is more satisfying in sports than David toppling Goliath through skill and guile?But in the modern game, Herzog argues, players don't learn these skills, and the game no longer rewards them if they do. Expanded playoffs mean that more teams reach the postseason, so excellence over 162 games is less important than ever before. Players know that their agents will negotiate salaries based on their home runs, batting averages, and RBI counts; why learn the parts of the game that don't show up in the box scores? The richest teams can bash their way into the playoffs by signing the players they need to play a power game at bat and on the mound. The free-agent draft deemphasizes good scouting, and the bonuses being paid to untested rookies further widen the gap between rich and poor. For the majority of teams, the season is over before it's begun; their economic circumstances won't let them play the only style you can win with today.But it would be wrong to lump Herzog in with the crowd that says things can never be as good as they used to be. Outrageous, thought-provoking, candid, and laugh-out-loud funny, You're Missin' a Great Game celebrates the game of baseball as it was, and as it can be again. For all the fans revitalized by the excitement and glamour of the home-run chase and the barrier-breaking '98 season, Whitey Herzog shows how -- with some intelligent planning and attention to the virtues of the game -- baseball's best days can and should be still ahead of us.

Comments: (7)

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breakingthesystem
I gotta laugh at people offended by Whitey's brashness and egotism. What a sterile world these people live in. Whitey's personality was what endeared him to Cardinals fans in the '80s and continues to endear him to Cardinals fans even today. Of course it helped that his teams won a few games. Redbirds fans still feel like Whitey is their personal fishing buddy. This book is a wonderful rehash of baseball in the '80s, notably Cardinals baseball. Fans of other teams will not likely be so moved by the book. So what? There are a million baseball books out there, and this one is for Cardinals or maybe Royals fans. Whitey may think he knows everything about baseball, and that's part of his charm. Every page is entertaining, filled with anecdotes and personalities.
Ximinon
This book has a few weird ideas (World Series stadium and bingo parlor?; teaching the spitball to upgrade the Rockies' pitching staff?) and several factual/numerical errors. Part of the time it reads like an advertisement for Whitey, Inc. He also plays the "should've" game when he seems to believe that his teams should have won two or three additional World Series. But, you expect this sort of opinionation in a clearly subjective book.
I have to agree with just about everything else Herzog says. His thesis is that the wild expansion of revenues available to SOME baseball teams is not only wrecking competitive balance, but is also changing the way the game is played, resulting in a sloppy style of baseball that revolves around the home run. For example, last year's Cardinal team, led by Mark McGwire, set a new National League home run record, but finished with only an 84-78 record! In contrast, look at the style of play in the NFL, which is more varied and complex than ever, due in part to the fact that wealthy franchises can't outspend the rest of the league and bowl teams over with talent alone. I'm certainly not a total fan of NFL-style socialism, but baseball's distribution of revenues is way too skewed in favor of certain teams. Herzog's remedies may or may not work, but, if changes aren't made, lets see what happens when lockout/strike time rolls around again. Or, maybe we'll see a franchise or two go belly-up.
If I had to describe this book in one word, it would be "timely". While most baseball people are still basking in the glory of last year's "Greatest Season Ever", Whitey plays the role of the canary in the coal mine as he delves into baseball's deeply troubled underpinnings. On the bright side. baseball has survived management by successive generations of blithering idiots for over a hundred years. Whether you're an optimist (Yankee fan) or a pessimist (Pirate-Expo-Twin-Royal fan), read this book now so you will have a better grasp of the problem when baseball's financial and stylistic walking pneumonia flares up and sends the Game back to the intensive care unit.
Alsalar
This treatise by Whitey Herzog is like the White Rat himself; straightforward, gruff, and thought-provoking. Herzog criticizes today's homer-centered, steroid-based play, recounts his years as manager and general manager, and analyzes many additional factors. A skilled handler of pitching staffs, Herzog describes his actions here in readable detail. He also offers views on many facets of baseball, including finances, labor relations, franchise competitiveness, trades, the designated hitter, player development, teams he managed in the playoffs (Kansas City) and World Series (St. Louis), etc. Herzog blames the Cardinal loss in the 1985 Series on that famous bad call, but this is only probable, as KC still had two good hitters due up in a one-run game. Herzog also suggests a host of changes for the game, many sensible, others debatable. Readers might not always agree with Herzog or his salty language, but his words should make them think as deeply about the game as he does.

This slightly-dated (1999) book remains a valuable and fast-paced read, but with enough factual errors (Lou Brock stole 118 bases not 114, Bud Grant lost four Super Bowls not three, Marvin Miller became union head in 1966 not the 1970's) that one wonders why publishers seldom assign to their baseball books editors versed in sports trivia. Still, despite minor flaws, this is a thoughtful look by a man who'se love for baseball comes through loud and clear.
Kea
As a baseball fan in general, and a Cardinal fan in particular, you've got to love Whitey. I almost went into mourning when he quit managing the Cardinals in '90, and reading this book is just like having him back. The only problem is that he isn't the GM and Manager of the Cardinals right now! If the "powers to be" in baseball had any sense, they would hire this man as the Supreme Commander and let him go crazy. Nothing but good would happen. While I don't necessarily agree with all of his ideas (what's up with the World Series/Bingo Parlor stadium idea?) he has the track record and the insight to give baseball the kind of vision it needs to correct it's flaws. Whitey is one of us.... a regular guy who has also seen and done most everything there is to do in the game of baseball. Not only does baseball need him, but the fans want him and his style of play. If I had 1 tip to give Cardinals ownership it would be to bring him back tomorrow and let him run the show. Before too long, we'd see the Runnin' Redbirds, good fundamental baseball, winning seasons, and 3 million + attendance figures. Great book by a great guy. If you like baseball, you can't miss this one.
You're Missin' a Great Game: From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back download epub
Baseball
Author: Whitey Herzog,Jonathan Pitts
ISBN: 1416552057
Category: Sports & Outdoors
Subcategory: Baseball
Language: English
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (February 1, 2007)
Pages: 320 pages