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The 1969 Seattle Pilots: Major League Baseball's One-Year Team download epub

by Kenneth Hogan


Epub Book: 1415 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1219 kb.

The Mariners were not Seattle's first major league baseball team. Age Range:18 years and up. Grade Range:Postsecondary and higher.

book by Kenneth Hogan. The Mariners were not Seattle's first major league baseball team. In 1937, Seattle businessman Emil Sick bought the city's failing Pacific Coast League team, the Indians, renamed them the Rainiers and constructed a new, state-of-the-art stadium.

Interviews with fourteen players, tables and player stats are also provided"-Provided by publisher.

Major League Baseball's One-year Team. Published November 27, 2006 by McFarland & Company.

Seattle Postcards: The Seattle Rainiers. The 1969 Seattle Pilots: Major League Baseball's One-Year Team, page 7-8, author, Kenneth Hogan. Category:1894 births Category:1964 deaths Category:Canadian brewers Category:Businesspeople from Seattle Category:Canadian businesspeople Category:American brewers. htm - Vancouver Baseball History, by Jim Bennie (CKWX radio).

The Seattle Pilots' season involved the Pilots' finishing sixth in the American League West with a record of 64. .

The Seattle Pilots' season involved the Pilots' finishing sixth in the American League West with a record of 64 wins and 98 losses, 33 games behind the Minnesota Twins. The team would spend only one season in Seattle, as the franchise would move to Milwaukee the following season. A book about the season exists called The 1969 Seattle Pilots: Major League Baseball's One-Year Team by Kenneth Hogan. Part of the Pilots season was also documented in the book Ball Four by Jim Bouton

The Mariners were not Seattle's first major league baseball team.

The Mariners were not Seattle's first major league baseball team.

The team would spend only one season in Seattle, as the franchise would move to Milwaukee the following .

The team would spend only one season in Seattle, as the franchise would move to Milwaukee the following season. Part of the Pilots season was also documented in the book Ball Four by Jim Bouton. After the Pilots, there would not be another MLB team in Seattle, until the birth of the Mariners in by1977.

Record: 64-98, Finished 6th in AL Western Division (1969 AL). Managed by Joe Schultz. Coaches: Frankie Crosetti, Sal Maglie, Eddie O'Brien, Ron Plaza and Sibby Sisti. Ballpark: Sicks Stadium. After finishing in last place in the AL West, they moved to Milwaukee, WI before the start of the 1970 season.

Home of the Seattle Pilots for one year, Sicks Stadium opened in 1935. Originally, the stadium was built for the Seattle Rainers of the Pacific Coast League. It's now a hardware store. Baseball Art Baseball Players Baseball Stuff American Football League American League Yankee Stadium Stadium Tour Association Football Perfect Game. 1969 Seattle Pilots scorebook showing what would eventually become the Kingdome- too late for the Pilots. What others are saying.

The 1969 Seattle Pilots: Major League Baseball's One-Year Team

The 1969 Seattle Pilots: Major League Baseball's One-Year Team. Usually ships within 1 to 2 months. The Pilots, an American League expansion franchise in 1969, finished in last place in their only season in the city and - due to management's financial miscues that were worse than anything seen in Sick Stadium - relocated to Milwaukee shortly before the start of the 1970 season. But what a wild ride it was for one year, as the Pilots started their only year with a roster of major league cast-offs, career minor-leaguers and several players who made the grade through a variety of tryout camps that were conducted under game conditions.

The Mariners were not Seattle's first major league baseball team. In 1937, Seattle businessman Emil Sick bought the city's failing Pacific Coast League team, the Indians, renamed them the Rainiers and constructed a new, state-of-the-art stadium. Over the next few decades, at least two teams the Kansas City A's and the Cleveland Indians would consider relocating to Seattle, and both PCL president Dewey Soriano and Cleveland Indians owner William Daly lobbied to bring a major league team to the booming city. Their efforts paid off in 1967, when despite shrinking Rainiers attendance figures, Seattle was awarded the second of two American League expansion teams. For one season-1969-Sick's Stadium became the home of the Seattle Pilots. From the earliest days of the franchise through their final move, this book tells the story of the first one-year team in the American or National League since 1901 (when, ironically, the Milwaukee Brewers left town after the AL's first year of major-league status). After a concise discussion of Seattle's amateur and minor league history, the main text provides a detailed account of the efforts to bring major league baseball to town, the first team draft, the 1969 spring training and regular season, the attempt to save the team, and finally the move to Milwaukee. Brief interviews with fourteen players round out the text. Tables including a team roster, final league standings, wins and losses and player stats are also provided.

Comments: (7)

Small Black
Like most of you, I've been enchanted with the 1969 Seattle Pilots ever since I picked up a copy of Jim Bouton's Ball Four back when I was in high school. The Pilots only played in the American League for one year, but that one year just happens to have been recorded in one of baseball's seminal autobiographies. So all those wacky outcasts, misfits, and ne'er-do-wells, still hold an outsized space in most of our collective baseball memories.

What Kenneth Hogan seeks to do in this book is tell the whole story -- the history of minor-league baseball in Seattle, how the Pilots came to join the league, what happened day by day in 1969, and why the team went bankrupt and was sold to Milwaukee's Bud Selig during Spring Training 1970.

The information presented is interested, and I didn't know much of it beforehand. The day-by-day events of the 1969 season you can learn from "Ball Four" or from a review of all the boxscores and play-by-play stored free on on Retrosheet, but Hogan does put it all in one place, and injects commentary throughout.

On the down side, the book is woefully edited, with tons of typos, amateurish prose, and an overuse of exclamation points. Hogan refers to John Olerud's dad as "a future Major Leaguer". Nope. He also conflates the names Jim McGlothlin and Lynn McGlothen, which nobody who collected baseball cards in the 1970s would never do. We are told that by 1969, the Washington Senators hadn't had a winning season in over 10 years ... which is a curious thing to say about a team in only its ninth season. Tons of other errors.

Hogan includes transcripts of all his interviews (with 16 Seattle players or other personnel) at the back of the book. Most of the interview subjects shared kindly or warm reminiscences. Mike Marshall answered only in passive-aggressive monosyllables, but less well-remembered players like Dick Baney and Wayne Comer spoke at length and shared really interesting insights. Jim Bouton was not interviewed.

I have a soft spot for the '69 Pilots, and so do you. This book is... OK. I read it because it's about the Pilots. I just wish that I'd been asked to copy-edit it, before I paid to read it.

Hogan also takes a slap at Jim Bouton ("never one to keep his thoughts to himself"), which is a rude thing to say about A) the guy who's book is cited in more than half of your footnotes, and B) the guy who, if he hadn't written such a memorable book, nobody would have been interested in yours.
Jare
Probably the most obscure team in the history of Major League Baseball, the 1969 Seattle Pilots are mainly known for two things: 1) being the focal point of Jim Bouton's controversial tell-all "Ball Four," and 2) only playing one year before a bankruptcy forced them to relocate to Milwaukee, where they became the Brewers. The Pilots weren't completely devoid of talent--their leadoff hitter led the Majors with 73 stolen bases, and their first baseman clubbed 25 homers--but pitching woes and injuries eventually mired them into last place. What really did them in, however, was profound mismanagement that kept the roster in in continuous transition and also wrecked the team's finances.

Kenneth Hogan clearly did his research, judging from the bibliography, statistical information, and player interviews he incorporates into the book. On the downside, he could have used a proofreader; a number of grammatical errors can be found, particularly in punctuation. If you can overlook this, however, then this book is an informative look into a team whose legacy is a matter of baseball trivia.
Deeroman
Game by game replay of the one and only season of Seattle's first major league baseball team. I enjoyed it, but I am a fan of Seattle sports history.
Agalen
Good coverage of the facts that lead to the development and demise of this one-year MLB franchise. I would recommend this to anyone interested in baseball history.
Melipra
Good overview of the season. Not terribly creative, but written OK. What made it good is going down memory lane on this team and the players.
ACOS
For every baseball fan
Sadaron above the Gods
I went to a lot of games in '69 at Sick's stadium & loved the Pilots - definitely read Jim Bouton's Ball Four - Seattle got screwed by Bud Selig /Milwaukee in 1970 - fun book for anecdotes & historical tasty tidbits
Ninety-one pages are essentially box score descriptions with a generous sprinkling of photos, most of them either team player shots or photos of baseball cards, with a few wire service photos mixed in. The remainder --- Chapters 1-7, containing history of baseball in Seattle and the events leading up to Opening Day; and Chapter 10 of the aftermath --- rely heavily via footnotes upon the out-of-print 1993 "The Seattle Pilots Story" by Carson Van Lindt and Jim Bouton's "Ball Four".

There is a thirty-four page Appendix A containing questions answered by sixteen former Pilots that contains a few interesting responses.

Some silly editorial comments are spread throughout the book, along with some glaring errors that a decent editor would have caught and had corrected.

Since "The Seattle Pilots Story" is out of print, this volume is the only one-volume summary of the history of the Pilots, so it fills a need, but it leaves much to be desired.
The 1969 Seattle Pilots: Major League Baseball's One-Year Team download epub
Baseball
Author: Kenneth Hogan
ISBN: 0786427868
Category: Sports & Outdoors
Subcategory: Baseball
Language: English
Publisher: McFarland (November 27, 2006)
Pages: 204 pages