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by Ed Linn,Leo Durocher


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Nice Guys Finish Last has been added to your Cart. However, after reading "Nice Guys Finish Last", I have new respect for the man. A fierce competitor and someone who genuinely loved the game, Durocher comes across as someone you would like to have had a few beers with while listening to hours of amazing baseball stories. Durocher has a candid, honest way of speaking, and he doesn't hold back.

Ed Linn (1922–2000), a well respected sports-writer, was the author of 17 books, including Hitter: The Life and Turmoils of Ted Williams, Nice Guys Finish Last, and Where the Money Is. Product details.

by. Leo Durocher (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Ed Linn (1922–2000), a well respected sports-writer, was the author of 17 books, including Hitter: The Life and Turmoils of Ted Williams, Nice Guys Finish Last, and Where the Money Is.

Durocher began his career inauspiciously, riding the bench for the powerhouse 1928 Yankees and hitting so poorly that Babe Ruth nicknamed him "e;the All-American Ou. .e; But soon Durocher hit his stride: traded to St. Louis, he found his headlong play and never-say-die attitude a perfect fit with the rambunctious "e;Gashouse Gang"e; Cardinals.

Leo Durocher’s Nice Guys Finish Last makes my short list of baseball's best memoirs. Major league baseball from the Twenties through the Fifties boasted a captivating array of distinctive personalities – and Leo knew them all. Baseball’s characters included Babe Ruth, Frankie Frisch, Bill Klem, Fatty Fothergill, Branch Rickey, Dusty Rhodes and, of course, Leo Durocher himself. Leo’s baseball life reads like a history of the sport in the 20th century. He played with Ruth and Gehrig on the legendary N Leo Durocher’s Nice Guys Finish Last makes my short list of baseball's best memoirs.

The resulting book, Nice Guys Finish Last, is baseball at its best, brimming with personality and full of.

Durocher began his career inauspiciously, riding the bench for the powerhouse 1928 Yankees and hitting so poorly that Babe Ruth nicknamed him the All-American Out. But soon Durocher hit his stride: traded to St. Louis, he found his headlong play and never-say-die attitude a perfect fit with the rambunctious Gashouse Gang Cardinals.

Nice Guys Finish Last, by Leo Durocher with Ed Linn Look up nice guys finish last in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Leo Durocher at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Nice Guys Finish Last, by Leo Durocher with Ed Linn. Durocher's forthright autobiography was recently re-published by the University of Chicago Press. Look up nice guys finish last in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors). Leo Durocher managerial career statistics at Baseball-Reference. NY Times obituary – July 27 'On This Day'. A 16-page excerpt from Durocher's autobiography, Nice Guys Finish Last. Leo Durocher at Find a Grave.

Nice guys finish last was the title of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Leo Durocher’s article in the April 1948 Cosmopolitan and also the title of his 1975 autobiography. The Brooklyn Dodgers were playing the New York Giants at the Polo Grounds on July 5, 1946. in last place, Durocher was quoted as saying in the following day’s New York (NY) Journal-American. Journal-American sportswriter Frank Graham (1893-1965) wrote about the circumstance of the quotation in his book, The New York Giants: An Informal History (1952)

Although suspended for associating with gamblers, Durocher bounced back to coach and manage-his last seasons as skipper were spent with the second-division Cubs and Astros.

Although suspended for associating with gamblers, Durocher bounced back to coach and manage-his last seasons as skipper were spent with the second-division Cubs and Astros. not to mention Cletus Elwood (""Boots"") Poffenberger. A slugging biography of the author's nearly fifty years in baseball, highlighted by reminiscences as rousing as the utterances of Leo the Lip himself. Raised in a French Catholic household in West Springfield, Mass. Durocher later broke in as a shortstop with the 1925 Yankees.

“I believe in rules. Sure I do. If there weren't any rules, how could you break them?” The history of baseball is rife with colorful characters. But for sheer cantankerousness, fighting moxie, and will to win, very few have come close to Leo “the Lip” Durocher. Following a five-decade career as a player and manager for baseball’s most storied franchises, Durocher teamed up with veteran sportswriter Ed Linn to tell the story of his life in the game. The resulting book, Nice Guys Finish Last, is baseball at its best, brimming with personality and full of all the fights and feuds, triumphs and tricks that made Durocher such a success—and an outsized celebrity. Durocher began his career inauspiciously, riding the bench for the powerhouse 1928 Yankees and hitting so poorly that Babe Ruth nicknamed him “the All-American Out.” But soon Durocher hit his stride: traded to St. Louis, he found his headlong play and never-say-die attitude a perfect fit with the rambunctious “Gashouse Gang” Cardinals. In 1939, he was named player-manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers—and almost instantly transformed the underachieving Bums into perennial contenders. He went on to manage the New York Giants, sharing the glory of one of the most famous moments in baseball history, Bobby Thomson’s “shot heard ’round the world,” which won the Giants the 1951 pennant. Durocher would later learn how it felt to be on the other side of such an unforgettable moment, as his 1969 Cubs, after holding first place for 105 days, blew a seemingly insurmountable 8-1/2-game lead to the Miracle Mets. All the while, Durocher made as much noise off the field as on it. His perpetual feuds with players, owners, and league officials—not to mention his public associations with gamblers, riffraff, and Hollywood stars like George Raft and Larraine Day—kept his name in the headlines and spread his fame far beyond the confines of the diamond. A no-holds-barred account of a singular figure, Nice Guys Finish Last brings the personalities and play-by-play of baseball’s greatest era to vivid life, earning a place on every baseball fan’s bookshelf.


Comments: (7)

uspeh
Over a third of a century has passed since Leo Durocher's book was first published in 1975 soon after he retired from baseball. This new edition offers an opportunity to relive the life of Leo The Lip for those of us old enough to remember him and a chance for later day baseball fans to get to know one of the game's most influential managers.

I began following baseball in 1951, the year Durocher's New York Giants stormed from 13 1/2 games out to force the playoff with the Brooklyn Dodgers for the National League pennant in which Bobby Thomson settled it with the shot heard round the world. It also was the year Willie Mays broke into the major leagues and Durocher stood by him when he struggled to live up to expectations. Durocher already had more than a quarter of a century in baseball before I walked in. This book provided me with a good look at his early life, his career as an ordinary player whose never quit style compensated for his lack of talent, and the great years as the manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, a team he took from chronic loser status to one of baseball's most successful franchises before moving north of the Brooklyn Bridge.

I contend Leo really was a nice guy because it is clear he recognized Mays' greatness and his need for a mentor like Leo to bring out the stardom in him. He also was a nice guy because he told the truth even when it hurt like when he made it clear to Giants brass that the team wasn't nearly as great as they thought it was. They chose to ignore him and went rapidly downhill after the wonderful 1954 World Series where they swept the heavily favored Cleveland Indians.

Durocher stood up to two commissioners and he details his experiences with them here. Leo recognized that Happy Chandler was a buffoon unfit to be baseball's czar and he writes about their differences. Then there was the time Leo and his wife double teamed Bowie Kuhn and challenged efforts to set Durocher up. Bet Bowie never issued another breakfast invitation to Lynne Walker Goldblatt Durocher!

This is a well written, easy reading story. If you don't read it you'll finish last whether of not you're a nice guy.
Mallador
Being a die hard baseball fan who came of age far after Leo Durocher's years in the majors, I didn't know what to expect from the book. However, it kept me entertained for every part except the last couple of chapters. His life and times in baseball covered some of the most interesting characters and events one man could've hoped to experience: ranging from playing with Babe Ruth, Louh Gehrig, the Gas House Gang, managing the Dodgers, managing Jackie Robinson, managing the Giants during Bobby Thomson's famed home run, managing Willie Mays to so many other events. This man truly had an entertaining ride through his baseball career. I do echo another commenter who said having prior baseball historical knowledge would help your enjoyment of the book. I thoroughly enjoyed the chapters that covered persons or events that I was familiar with, but some that have lost significance over time (culturally speaking) were not as easily accessible to me. Causing me to enjoy those portions less.

My only critique is the last couple of chapters devolve into the rantings of any old person crying about how things used to be so much better back in his day. He complains about overpaid athletes, poor umpiring, Marvin Miller, etc. I felt like the only thing that had to be added in was him yelling at kids to get off his lawn.

However, regardless of that critique, the first 400 or so odd pages of the book are great. I recommend this highly.
Xurad
Most of what I'd ever read or heard about Leo Durocher didn't make him seem to be a very likeable character. There are hundreds of stories of his fighting, foul-mouthed, and "win at all costs" approach to the game.

However, after reading "Nice Guys Finish Last", I have new respect for the man. A fierce competitor and someone who genuinely loved the game, Durocher comes across as someone you would like to have had a few beers with while listening to hours of amazing baseball stories.

Durocher has a candid, honest way of speaking, and he doesn't hold back. He speaks with great admiration about many players, managers, and even umpires, but also doesn't hesitate to blast anyone he thought was unfair to him.

Some of his stories are probably a little exaggerated. I've read some accounts elsewhere that weren't quite as interesting, or that didn't put Leo in such a positive light. However, if you like baseball and are looking for a fun read, this is a great book. I consider it one of my favorite sports books, right up there with Art Donovan's "Fatso" and Sparky Lyle's "The Bronx Zoo."
Ieslyaenn
Nice Guys is a wonderful and honest portrayl of a man who hated to lose. This is the type of man you need on your team--a get in their face kind of guy. I'd read several other Dodger biographies and most of his players loved and admired Durocher. I read this book to find out why. This was an enjoyable read that changed my perspective on Leo and baseball.
Lahorns Gods
Loved this book. Tells about how baseball was in it's hey day before commercialism took over. If you grew up in those times and can remember what a joy it was to go to the ballpark back then, you will enjoy Leo's story of how it got that way, and how he handled the situations he got into. Great book.
Whitebeard
whats there to say...5stars
Nikok
Nice easy read from a man who spanned the golden age of baseball and continued to manage right before free agency hit and changed the game. Right or wrong, Leo does a nice job of sharing stories that demonstrate the shifting attitudes of ball players through the years. A good read for anyone that enjoys reading about baseball's days gone by.
Nice Guys Finish Last download epub
Biographies
Author: Ed Linn,Leo Durocher
ISBN: 0226173887
Category: Sports & Outdoors
Subcategory: Biographies
Language: English
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (September 15, 2009)
Pages: 456 pages