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The Only Game in Town: Sportswriting from The New Yorker (Modern Library (Paperback)) download epub

by David Remnick


Epub Book: 1842 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1520 kb.

The New Yorker has met this challenge more successfully and more originally than any other modern American journal. It has indelibly shaped the genre known as the Profile.

The New Yorker has met this challenge more successfully and more originally than any other modern American journal. Starting with light-fantastic evocations of glamorous and idiosyncratic figures of the twenties and thirties.

When Harold Ross founded The New Yorker in 1925, he called it a comic weekly. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). has been added to your Cart. And although it has become much more than that.

This collection features more contemporary writers, some who currently contribute to The New Yorker.

Series: Modern Library (Paperback). This collection features more contemporary writers, some who currently contribute to The New Yorker. 5 people found this helpful.

To take some of the best sports stories and put them in a book called "The Only Game in Town" is a natural. David Remnick has done that.

The Only Game in Town. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. For more than eighty years, The New Yorker has been home to some of the toughest, wisest, funniest, and most moving sportswriting around. The New Yorker is, of course, a bastion of superb essays, influential investigative journalism, and insightful arts criticism. But for eighty years, it's also been a hoot.

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Автор: Remnick David Название: The Only Game in Town . Contains David Remnick& writings.

Contains David Remnick& writings.

Modern Library Paperbacks. Random House Publishing Group.

For more than eighty years, The New Yorker has been home to some of the toughest, wisest, funniest, and most moving sportswriting around. The Only Game in Town is a classic collection from a magazine with a deep bench, including such authors as Roger Angell, John Updike, Don DeLillo, and John McPhee. Hall of Famer Ring Lardner is here, bemoaning the lowering of standards for baseball achievement-in 1930. Modern Library Paperbacks.

I had this book, The Only Game in Town, on my to-read list for about two years and should have read it earlier. Instead I read it very shortly after reading another sports collection on the best writing of the 20th century. That book was obviously much better than this one as this book was just the best sportswriting from one magazine while the previous was the best sportswriting period. Sports stories in the New Yorker are common, though it wasn't until I digested this that I realized how deep the magazine's bench is. If Sports Illustrated has a better reputation than the New Yorker, it's only because SI has pictures.

2011, Modern Library.

The Only Game In Town Sportswriting From The New Yorker. The Only Game In Town Sportswriting From The New Yorker. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. 2011, Modern Library.

For more than eighty years, The New Yorker has been home to some of the toughest, wisest, funniest, and most moving sportswriting around. The Only Game in Town is a classic collection from a magazine with a deep bench, including such authors as Roger Angell, John Updike, Don DeLillo, and John McPhee. Hall of Famer Ring Lardner is here, bemoaning the lowering of standards for baseball achievement—in 1930. John Cheever pens a story about a boy’s troubled relationship with his father and the national pastime. From Lance Armstrong to bullfighter Sidney Franklin, from the Chinese Olympics to the U.S. Open, the greatest plays and players, past and present, are all covered in The Only Game in Town. At The New Yorker, it’s not whether you win or lose—it’s how you write about the game.


Comments: (7)

Malahelm
This is a pretty much foolproof anthology.

Most people know about The New Yorker's rich history of publishing great writing over the decades. The writers are a who's who of American literature. To take some of the best sports stories and put them in a book called "The Only Game in Town" is a natural.

David Remnick has done that. The editor of the New Yorker showed his own sports writing chops with a fabulous book on Muhammad Ali, so it's nice that he didn't bother to delegate this assignment of putting together the anthology together.

So a book like this is going to be really, really good. But how good? How is the typical sports fan going to enjoy it? That's a little tougher question.

When I look at other anthologies, my usual standard is to see what the batting average is for interesting articles. Let's apply that here.

There are some absolute, well-known classics here. Roger Angell's story on a college baseball game between St. John's and Yale retains its glory almost 30 years after it was written. John McPhee's profile of college basketball star Bill Bradley, "A Sense of Where You Are," fascinates to this day. And anyone could have guessed that John Updike's tale of Ted Williams' last game, "Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu," would be in here.

The best parts here might be the lesser known stories that therefore rank as surprises. Adam Gopnik has a terrific story on coaching kids' football, even if that hardly does the rich subject matter justice. Who expected an art history lesson in such a story, not to mention a touching personal tale? It might be my favorite story in the book, at least of those I hadn't read elsewhere. Charles Sprawson opens up obscure areas of sport with his story on long distance swimming, Arctic version. Nancy Franklin rekindled my interest on a pastime of my youth, ping-pong; she made me want to grab my racket out of the basement.

There are some good profiles here too. One on Tiger Woods almost is more revealing now than it was then, considering what's happened to Mr. Woods in the decade since it was written. A quote from father Earl is particularly haunting now: "Tiger was not created to be a golfer. Tiger was made to be a good person." Whoops. Stories about Michael Jordan, Yao Ming and Lance Armstrong are well done as well.

This being The New Yorker, there have to be some odd subjects. That's certainly the case here. My reaction to those stories were more mixed. Martin Ames has a short, pointed essay about "tennis personalities" that works well. Nick Paumgarten sucked me in on extreme skiing, Calvin Trillin taught me about the world of snowmobiling.

But there were other stories whose charms proved easier to resist. Alec Wilkinson's look at "parkour" seemed a bit out of place. Herbert Warren Wind, one of the best golf writers ever, takes a tour of Irish golf courses that seems a little too highbrow for some. Can't say I made through John Cheever's essay on baseball or Don DeLillo's story on football strategy or Alva Johnston's story on a boxing promoter from a century ago.

Oh, right, the cartoons are terrific, as you'd expect.

"The Only Game in Town," then, is a lot like the magazine. There's a certain style that comes with the pages. Most sports readers are certainly to enjoy a good portion of this book and make it worthwhile. And for passionate readers of the magazine who also like their fun and games, I have no doubt that this will be read and re-read for years to come.
Akirg
Some interesting essays and articles.
Sataxe
A great collection of sports stories and profiles. The writing is superb if a little 'selected'. Good writing never goes out of style.
Ricep
I bought this book for two of my nephews. The content was so good I wished I had bought one for myself and probably will. I started several of the selections and could hardly put it down. It touches on a variety of the "greats" and will be a book that sports fans will enjoy. The cartoons are fun, too.
Ylal
We're big New Yorker fams to begin with; this is a great collection with great variety. Highly recommend it-- has a lot of great viewpoints.
Jwalextell
Wonderful essays about the importance of athletics; very well-written and carefully selected. A classic and a keeper. Any 13-year old will be pleased to grow older with this. The New Yorker does it again!
Wenyost
Great book for all sports fans. Excellent variety of sports. Passion is found in every story. You will appreciate the depth.
If you're a hopeless follower of the classic periodical "The New Yorker" and have a love for sports, this is your book. Contained herein are selected stories from the best sports writing of a classic magazine. This is the type of book that you don't read in order from cover to cover. The selection of stories range from subjects of baseball to bullfighting to ping pong written by such Authors as Roger Angell, John Updike to Ring Lardner and Adam Gopnik.
David Remnick selected this compilation of stories and dedicated the book to Roger Angell who is the senior august sports writer for the New Yorker. In fact the very first story is the classic baseball saga entitled "The Web of the Game" written in 1981 by the aforementioned Mr. Angell. This story is an absolute classic of which I've seen nothing written any better on the subject of our national pastime. While this story is my favorite writing in this book, the other selections are eclectic and diverse with great writing.
This is a type of book which you don't gulp down from chapter to chapter. It is to be taken as a fine wine. Sipping is allowed to digest these stories of sport which goes far beyond the normal jock type sports writing where the spoils of victory are the only rhyme of reason. These stories go beyond the "jock mentality" of present day Fox sports and immediate Sports Center gratification coming from the studios of ESPN. This is the type of book that you go for an eclectic night's diversion of thoughtful insight into the world of sport as seen from the writer's prospective of that certain time period. The stories are humorous at times. sad at times and always thought provoking. Also as an aside, in true New Yorker tradition, its pages are scattered with its thought provoking cartoons.
Great read and fully deserving the 5 Star rating!!
The Only Game in Town: Sportswriting from The New Yorker (Modern Library (Paperback)) download epub
Miscellaneous
Author: David Remnick
ISBN: 0812979982
Category: Sports & Outdoors
Subcategory: Miscellaneous
Language: English
Publisher: Modern Library; Reprint edition (June 14, 2011)
Pages: 512 pages