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The Rifle download epub

by Gary Paulsen


Epub Book: 1958 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1505 kb.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A treasured rifle passed down through generations is the cause of a tragic accident in this timely tale. With subtle mastery and precision.

Gary Paulsen was born on May 17, 1939 in Minnesota. During the first few years of his life, his father was stationed in Europe during World War II and his mother worked in a factory. Paulsen was raised by his grandmother and aunts. He lived overseas after the war in the Phillippines between 1946-49. Ever since he was fifteen, he worked many jobs to support himself.

Gary James Paulsen (born May 17, 1939) is an American writer of young adult literature, best known for coming of age stories about the wilderness. He is the author of more than 200 books and has written more than 200 magazine articles and short stories, and several plays, all primarily for teenagers. He won the Margaret Edwards Award from the American Library Association in 1997 for his lifetime contribution in writing for teens.

Alternative title: How I Lost My Respect for Gary Paulsen. Gary Paulsen uses his usual gift of prose in this short novel, but the book is more a political rant than a novel. In fact, given the sheer ridiculousness of the book's central premise, it's hard to see it as anything close to a well-crafted story.

The rifle/Gary Paulsen. Because rifling of a bore was, historically speaking, a relatively new concept-less than a century old-most rifles were not as accurate as they could be. p. cm. Summary: A priceless, handcrafted rifle, fired throughout the American Revolution, is passed down through the years until it fires on a fateful Christmas Eve of 1994 Because rifling of a bore was, historically speaking, a relatively new concept-less than a century old-most rifles were not as accurate as they could be.

Gary Paulsen is one of the most popular writers of young adult fiction in America today.

Narrated by Norman Dietz. In this wonderfully crafted novel, a rifle, not the people who come to own it, is the main character. Gary Paulsen is one of the most popular writers of young adult fiction in America today.

Paulsen was a book lover from his childhood

Paulsen was a book lover from his childhood. He developed love for reading at a young age. When he got the first book issued from the library he went to the basement of his house and read it without a stop. He then read several books in the basement of his house. Paulsen didn’t have actual family life, till the age of seven.

A treasured rifle passed down through generations is the cause of a tragic accident in this timely tale. Gary Paulsen is one of the most honored writers of contemporary literature for young readers. He has written more than one hundred book for adults and young readers, and is the author of three Newbery Honor titles& Dogsong, Hatchet, and The Winter Room. He divides his time among Alaska, New. Our Neighborhood At Work (Classroom Big Book). Margaret Miller, Gary Paulsen.

A priceless, handcrafted rifle, fired throughout the American Revolution, is passed down through the years until it. .

A priceless, handcrafted rifle, fired throughout the American Revolution, is passed down through the years until it fires on a fateful Christmas Eve, in 1994. In 1768 a gunsmith named Cornish McManus built a rifle of such accuracy that he knew he could never create another like it. He intended to keep and treasure his master. see all. He intended to keep and treasure his masterpiece, but with a new wife to provide for, he felt pressed to sell it. Soon the rifle was helping one John Byam become a legendary sharpshooter in the American Revolution.

To be sure, it was hard to check. There is not a breech to the rifle, nothing to open to see if there is a cartridge, and in fact there is no cartridge t firmly on top of i.READ BOOK: The Rifle by Gary Paulsen online free. You can read book The Rifle by Gary Paulsen in our library for absolutely free.

In 1768, a gunsmith named Cornish McManus built a rifle of such accuracy that he know he could never create another like it. He intended to treasure his masterpiece, but with a new wife to provide for, he felt pressed to sell it. Soon the rifle was helping one John Byam become a legendary sharpshooter in the American Revolution. But when Byam succumbed to dysentery, the weapon was passed on to yet another owner...and then to another and another, until the present day.Strangely, in all the time of the rifle after John Byam's death and through all the people who looked at it and held it to their shoulder, not once in the life of the rifle did anybody ever think to see if it was loaded.The rifle was loaded.

Comments: (7)

Majin
Love reading it still today. Reminds me of when I first picked up the book and just loved it in high school. Now I own a flintlock and realize the challenges of shooting one and everything make it even better.
Wat!?
This is a great book. Written wonderfully with suspense and hunger for more.
Kizshura
Very Good
Qiahmagha
Arrived quickly! Its a great book for anyone! Quick but facinating read
Kifer
I grew up loving hatchet and went on a Paulsen spending spree. This is now one of my favorite books of all time
Moogugore
108 pages of very good writing. An excellent story about a man and his hand made rifle and how many different owners it had and where it's final resting place was. A very fast and a very good read.
Faegal
My 10-year old's teacher recommened this book for a book report. She read it in about 3 days, she couldn't put it down and begged me to read it. She actually purchased this for her great uncle as a Christmas present! We all enjoyed this read.
I have enjoyed some of Paulsen's other work and usually find him to be a very subtle and engaging writer. The first half or so of this book is a clear demonstration of his strengths. The care with which he describes the making of this rifle and the soldier who uses it in the Revolutionary War is extraordinary.

Unfortunately, the book begins its downhill slide when Paulsen resorts to caricature of an NRA type who takes possession of the rifle. We are supposed to believe that this man has a head full of ballistic facts yet no understanding that, for example, the weapons used by Gen. Custer and his men would have had poor accuracy. The few people I have known who have been very knowledgeable about ballistics also well understood accuracy issues in older weapons, because that goes hand-in-hand with knowing about ballistics. Despite my misgivings about this inept characterization, I kept reading, hoping once the rifle passed into other hands, Paulsen would return to his usual quality writing.

I was wrong, and honestly I wish I had just put the book down before I finished it, because that unrealistic character was only the beginning of a slide into the preposterous. Paulsen spends time drawing a picture of the new characters and situation the rifle has landed in, and I was fooled into thinking that perhaps something interesting would happen. In fairness, I suppose something interesting did happen, just not something believable.

(I suppose this next section has spoilers).

We are not only meant to believe that no one (not even the gun dealers who have handled it) checked to see if the gun was loaded, but that the gunpowder was still viable after all these years. Yes, Paulsen goes into a thoroughgoing explanation of why it was still viable, and I suppose it is remotely possible if not highly plausible. But he doesn't stop there. No, then we also have to believe that the candles were placed just so and a spark from the fireplace rose just so and voila! DEATH! Of course, not just any death; for complete emotional manipulation, a death of a child works best, so the ball goes through one house and into another and into the skull of a teenaged boy.

This is only even remotely plausible in the sense that you once in a while see news items of completely random, freak accidents that seem only explicable by extreme bad luck or perhaps that once the Reaper has decided it's your time, it must be your time no matter what sort of bizarre circumstance the Reaper must conjure up to get you. Yes, occasionally, some guy in Florida suddenly finds his entire house--with him inside--swallowed by a sinkhole, but these freak occurrences are so unpredictable and uncontrollable that they do not make any particular point. So, too, this rifle going off in this way.

You can see from how contrived the situation is that Paulsen wants very much for us to come around to believing that, hey, guns are the problem! There are more believable and less manipulative ways he could have made that point if he had wanted to, but he didn't. He wanted to make sure that children, his target audience, absolutely got the message. So, he has a young boy be the victim of a literally unbelievable series of random events that happen to involve a gun. If we're going for contrived, preposterous situations, it could have been almost anything that killed that boy instead of a gun. The family Christmas tree could have tipped over in the night and lit his house on fire. A sinkhole could have opened up just as he was opening the present he had most wanted. Heck, a meteorite could have hit his house just as his family was sitting down to say grace for Christmas dinner and that would have been just as plausible and believable as the situation Paulsen actually describes.

It is true that accidents happen with guns, sometimes even to people who think they have done all they can to prevent those accidents. This is true of almost everything, though, from soft furnishings (thank you, Bill Bryson) to power drills. In setting up such a ridiculous situation and attempting to emotionally manipulate the reader (a child killed! On Christmas Eve!), Paulsen really undermines any point he was trying to make. The copy I was reading had discussion questions in the back and the first one asked how you now feel about the idea that "guns don't kill people; people kill people." Of course, he felt he needed to use the hammer one last time, just in case we hadn't understood his point earlier. Having read that, I expected the next question to be, "Hey, do you now understand why guns are uniquely terrifying among all the machinery of man? DO YOU?" The book is just that nuanced.

I decided to give the book 2 stars instead of merely 1, despite how annoyed I was with the sheer absurdity of it, because the first part is really well done. So, if you start it, just don't finish it.
The Rifle download epub
Literature & Fiction
Author: Gary Paulsen
ISBN: 0440219205
Category: Teen & Young Adult
Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Laurel Leaf (February 10, 1997)