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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde download epub

by Robert Louis Stevenson


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Enfield and the lawyer were on the other side of the by-street; butwhen they came abreast of the entry, the former lifted up his cane andpointed. Did you ever remark that door?" he asked; and when his companion hadreplied in the affirmative

Enfield and the lawyer were on the other side of the by-street; butwhen they came abreast of the entry, the former lifted up his cane andpointed. Did you ever remark that door?" he asked; and when his companion hadreplied in the affirmative. It is connected in my mind," added he,"with a very odd story.

By Robert Louis Stevenson. Published by Planet eBook. That was the amount of information that the lawyer car-. 14 The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Visit the site to download free eBooks of classic literature, books and novels. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution- Noncommercial . United States License. ried back with him to the great, dark bed on which he tossed to and fro, until the small hours of the morning began to grow large. It was a night of little ease to his toiling mind, toiling in mere darkness and besieged by questions.

Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a gothic novella by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, first published in 1886. The work is also known as The Strange Case of Jekyll Hyde, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, or simply Jekyll & Hyde

Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a gothic novella by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, first published in 1886. The work is also known as The Strange Case of Jekyll Hyde, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, or simply Jekyll & Hyde. It is about a London legal practitioner named Gabriel John Utterson who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and the evil Edward Hyde

Adaptations of Strange Case of Dr. Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a novella written by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson and first published in 1886.

Adaptations of Strange Case of Dr. It is about a London lawyer who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll and the misanthropic Mr.

About the author Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh in 1850, into a family of famous . He died in 1894 in Samoa, where he and his wife and stepson had finally made a home.

About the author Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh in 1850, into a family of famous lighthouse engineers. Robert soon realised that engineering was not for him; on trips with his father around the Scottish coast he instead discovered a love of adventures and stories, and by the age of twenty-one he decided to become a writer. Have you read The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde?

THAT EVENING Mr. Utterson came home to his bachelor house in sombre spirits and sat down to dinner without relish.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. THAT EVENING Mr. It was his custom of a Sunday, when this meal was over, to sit close by the fire, a volume of some dry divinity on his reading desk, until the clock of the neighbouring church rang out the hour of twelve, when he would go soberly and gratefully to bed.

First published by Stevenson in 1886, three years after his success Treasure Island, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and . The reader later learns that the man is Mr Hyde. A crowd gathered and, to avoid a scene, the man offered to pay the girl compensation

First published by Stevenson in 1886, three years after his success Treasure Island, The Strange Case of Dr. Hyde has had a huge influence on the popular imagination, and especially comic book characters like The Hulk and Batman’s Two-Face. Summary Utterson and Enfield are out for a walk when they pass a strange-looking door (the entrance to Dr Jekyll’s laboratory). Enfield recalls a story involving the door. A crowd gathered and, to avoid a scene, the man offered to pay the girl compensation. This was accepted, and he opened the door with a key and re-emerged with some money and a large cheque.

Spencer Tracy plays Dr. Hyde in 1941

Spencer Tracy plays Dr. Hyde in 1941. Unfortunately indifference becomes more personal, more brutal in nature, as Hyde becomes more and more a caged animal who does not want to have to embrace the pretenses of Jekyll’s respectable position. 55 pages later and I’m still convinced that Robert Louis Stevenson named his characters this way exclusively so he could fit in the line if he shall be Mr. Hyde, I shall be Mr. Seek! and honestly? that’s iconic. Quiet minds cannot be perplexed or frightened but go on in fortune or misfortune at their own private pace, like a clock during a thunderstorm.

There is something strange happening on the streets of London. A monstrous brute by the name of Hyde prowls the streets, leaving a lascivious wake of brutality and violence and where Hyde treads, the mild mannered and sophisticated Dr. Jekyll is not far behind to pay for the damages. Dr. Jekyll's friend, Gabriel John Utterson, slowly begins to piece the mystery behind Dr. Jekyll's relationship to the unscrupulous Hyde but it isn't until he makes a startling discovery that the truth is revealed.

Comments: (7)

NI_Rak
It's presumptuous for Amazon to ask someone to "review" a classic of literature ... but I'd simply like to point out that in my opinion Stevenson is one of the great masters of light, elegant Entertainment Lit during its last great blossoming: Victorian England. Of course even the greatest classic English lit (ie Shakespeare's plays) were designed as entertainment: the more pompous, formal, ponderous moralistic stuff (like Johnson) survives only in academic circles and was probably endured rather than enjoyed even back in the day. But Stevenson is as pure an entertainer as Fred Astaire: breathtaking, charming, playful, he's chock full of of small, masterful asides but, like Stephen King's, they thrill and amuse but in no way distract as the tale races along -- they're like white water in the rapids. See for yourself: just find the first page of Jekyll and Hyde anywhere online and skim it -- you'll find it just feels like skimming, you'll be in a whole new world with a witty genius for a guide..
Lilegha
This is not the actual book Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde. It is actually a collection of speeches and essays about the REAL book and a summary of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde. That fact wasn't stated anywhere on the selling page.
CONVERSE
I love a good story of a mad scientist. It is told from the third person perspective of Dr. Jekyll's close friend Mr. Utterson. It's funny to me how long it took for him to put the idea together, though having heard of this story long before I read it, I imagine the thought of someone being two different people is hard to fathom.
Still, I enjoyed the surmounting evidence piling up for the real story and especially found it funny that Mr. Utterson had in his possession a letter that would explain things (even a little) very early on from Lanyon.
I expected the book to be told from Dr. Jekyll's point of view but I really liked that it focused on a concerned friend trying to understand what was going on with a mysterious will.
Ochach
I am reading Stevenson's complete tales chronologically, so this is my second volume, after _New Arabian Nights_. In this review, I will focus on the tales included in _The Merry Men and Other Tales and Fables_, as the book is in fact titled. For general comments on Stevenson, please see my review of _New Arabian Nights_, in which I comment, among other things, on Stevenson's ability to entertain his readers, a gift that so many writers, even so many popular writers, lack.

_The Merry Men_ (1887), a collection of 6 tales, is a worthy successor to _New Arabian Nights_ (1882). I do not find either one to be "better" or "worse" than the other; they are both equally pleasing and entertaining, and both are excellent examples of Stevenson's seductive narrative voice, a voice that combines suspense with vivid descriptions and a touch of humor. This mixture results in some of the most readable stories in the English language, as authors such as G. K. Chesterton, Jorge Luis Borges, Jack London, and Ernest Hemingway have remarked. The two collections are, furthermore, equally wide in scope, including elements of adventure, satire, parody, allegory, and the supernatural. I will comment on the stories included:

* The Merry Men: The title, as has been observed, refers to a particularly dangerous group of waves. The story takes place in an island, to which the protagonist, Charlie, retires. Aros, a farm on the island, is the property of Charlie's uncle Gordon, whose daughter, Mary, Charlie wishes to marry. Aros is famous for the shipwrecks that take place nearby, due to the "merry men," so Charlie is not only pursuing Mary, he also hopes to find the treasure of the sunken Spanish ship Espirito [sic, should be "Espíritu"] Santo. A great story, reminiscent of "The Pavilion on the Links," from _New Arabian Nights_.

* Will o' the Mill: A story in three parts, this is one of those narratives that cover the entirety of a character's life. Will lives in the country, and wishes to see the world. His life is changed when he notices Marjory, the parson's daughter. I found this to be an excellent story, and I must say it is not as predictable as may appear from the description. The good thing about "life-stories" is that they allow you to observe the destiny of a character, and Stevenson lets you draw your own conclusions from Will's life journey.

* Markheim: Borges included this story, along with the entire _New Arabian Nights_ collection, in one of the volumes of his "biblioteca personal." This is one of Stevenson's most famous stories, on the same level as "A Lodging for the Night" and "The Bottle Imp." I cannot say much about it without giving away the plot. Let me just say the story relies on the unexpected, and by reading the first two or three pages you would never expect what's coming. One of the gems in Stevenson's oeuvre.

* Thrawn Janet: A rare piece, as it is written in Scots! I understand there is only one other story that Stevenson wrote in this language, but it appears to be an uncollected tale. "Thrawn Janet" is a creepy ghost story, not a very profound one, but very entertaining nevertheless. The language may pose a slight challenge, but I am an ESL student and I had no trouble at all understanding the story. (The reason why I call myself an ESL student, by the way, is that I believe one does not simply stop being an ESL student; learning a second language is a wonderful life-long process, no matter how advanced one may be.)

* Olalla: According to Borges, Stevenson got the idea for this story from a dream. "Olalla" takes place in Spain, and this tale is another achievement in setting construction. A convalescing soldier stays at the estate of a very strange Spanish family, composed of a very basic son, his mother, and his mysterious, elusive sister, Olalla. The ominous presence of an uncanny portrait is an excellent addition to the plot. A compelling read, this was my favorite story in the collection.

* The Treasure of Franchard: Stevenson ended _New Arabian Nights_ on a lighter note with "Providence and the Guitar." He follows the same effective formula in this collection, with "The Treasure of Franchard," and in this case, with much greater success. This is a simply hilarious story about a family that adopts a boy who has the reputation of being a thief. The tale is mainly about the effects that wealth can have on a family. The story points to--and even lampoons, though respectfully--the work of Edgar Allan Poe.

_New Arabian Nights_ inspired me to read all of Stevenson's tales. _The Merry Men_ has increased my enthusiasm for the work of the immortal Tusitala, or "Teller of Tales," as the Samoans called Stevenson. Both of these works will fascinate lovers of the traditional short story. I look forward to reading _Island Nights' Entertainments_ (1893), the last collection of Stevenson stories to appear in the author's lifetime, and will share my reaction to it in a review.

Thanks for reading, and enjoy the book!
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde download epub
Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
ISBN: 1153746859
Category: Teen & Young Adult
Language: English
Publisher: General Books (2010)