» » Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring)

Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring) download epub

by Scott McNeely,et al


Epub Book: 1359 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1714 kb.

For years, Lonely Planet resisted pressure to cram the whole of Europe into a single guide. To the delight of backpackers everywhere, they've finally given in-with a vengeance

For years, Lonely Planet resisted pressure to cram the whole of Europe into a single guide. To the delight of backpackers everywhere, they've finally given in-with a vengeance. Of course, given Lonely Planet's youthful irreverence, you shouldn't expect your grandfather's Europe.

Europe on a Shoestring book. Written by expert travel writers, covering 40 countries with over 160 maps, this book is crammed with essential information, from cafes to campsites and passports to pubs

Europe on a Shoestring book. Written by expert travel writers, covering 40 countries with over 160 maps, this book is crammed with essential information, from cafes to campsites and passports to pubs. hike through the High Atlas Mountains in Morocco. shake your tail-feather with the hip and happenin Indispensable, Individual, Independent, this all-in-one guide will put your finger on the pulse of Europe.

Lonely Planet: The world’s leading travel guide publisherLonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring .

Lonely Planet: The world’s leading travel guide publisherLonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring is your passport to all the most relevant and up-to-date advice on what to see, what to skip, wha. Get to the heart of Europe and begin your journey now!Inside Lonely Planet’s Europe on a Shoestring Travel Guide:Colour maps and images and itineraries show you the simplest way to tailor your trip to your own personal needs and interestsInsider tips save you time and money, and help you get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spotsEssential.

Europe on a Shoestring by Lonely Planet Publications Ltd (Paperback, 2001). New (other): lowest price. item 1 Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Shoestring Guide)-Scott McNeely,etc. et a -Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Shoestring Guide)-Scott McNeely,etc. item 2 Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Shoestring Guide),, Very Good Book -Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Shoestring Guide),, Very Good Book.

Europe on a Shoestring: Big Trips on Small Budgets (Lonely Planet) By Tom Maste.

Western Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Shoestring Guides) By Tony Wheele. Europe on a Shoestring by Scott McNeely, etc - Lonely Planet Detailed Guide Book. Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring (Europe on a Shoestring, 2nd ed) By Scott. Europe on a Shoestring: Big Trips on Small Budgets (Lonely Planet) By Tom Maste. Europe on a Shoestring by Lonely Planet.

For years, Lonely Planet resisted pressure to cram the whole of Europe into a single guide.

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet Western Europe. First Words - Japanese: 100 Japanese words to learn. 64 MB·22,035 Downloads·New! Planet Kids, an imprint of Lonely Planet, the world's leading travel guide and phrasebook publishe. Lonely Planet Europe’s Best Trips (Travel Guide). 599 Pages·2017·100 Sri Lanka 13e 2015. 1 MB·10,762 Downloads.

Items related to Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring. For years, Lonely Planet resisted pressure to cram the whole of Europe into a single guide. The 30-odd book contributors believe it's possible to travel cheaply without sacrificing style, comfort, and safety

Items related to Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring. Scott McNeely Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring. ISBN 13: 9780864426482. Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring. The 30-odd book contributors believe it's possible to travel cheaply without sacrificing style, comfort, and safety. Though the accommodations sections focus on hostels, there are enough bed-and-breakfasts and guesthouses to keep you a safe distance from rowdy spring breakers, if you so desire.

Europe on a Shoestring. Ths practical, portable guide is an ideal companion for travellers on a tight budget. Packed with down-to-earth advice, money-saving tips and 144 maps, this Lonely Planet book beats the traditional budget guidebook hands down. Coverage includes all of the must-see spots in Europe, including major cities like London, Paris, Amsterdam and Prague, and recommendations are made for those who want to get off the beaten track.

Includes a first-time travellers' chapter with advice on everything from packing to staying on a budget. The guide contains the lowdown on 40 countries, with a comprehensive language guide for every country.

Comments: (7)

Amis
This book was my "Bible" for backpacking through Europe in '99 & '00. After having never stepped foot out of the US, i ventured to Europe alone w/ nothing but a backpack, some phone numbers & this book. I did not have the problems of out of date info as some have mentioned. In fact i came across some of the best & cheapest hotels i've ever been to, found very good inexpensive eats & learned how to read a map thanks to this book. Each chapter gives you some historical info on every country, city & town & even tells you what dangers to look out for, do's & dont's, train info & where to go if you need help. After 3 months crisscrossing 12 different European countries, my Lonely Planet Book was dog-eared, torn & severely worn-out...I highly recommend this book for long term travel on a buget.
Ballazan
excellent item, solved my problem
Uriel
I used this book this past summer for my European travels. It is a great essential book. It's a nice resource to have with you because it is so comprehensive that it gives you the freedom to change your plans and go where ever you want. I also found it very accurate and up to date (some of the prices had gone up.. but most were close). This book was also useful in planning my trip.
It does not replace a more specific guide book. Also the info in these books goes out of date quickly though (I had one other similar book that was 2 years old and it was nearly useless), so don't buy it for future trips. Only get it if you planning a wide ranging trip across the continent.
One other thing I really liked was the history and culture review of each country. It made it fun to read for the inevitable delays on the train.
Phallozs Dwarfs
This is a truly embarassing book.
I believe my copy included the year 2001 in the title (I binned it some time ago), but most sections of the book were at least 4 years out of date. Let's Go tells us that it is completely revised and updated every year, so I expected the same from Lonely Planet - why else would they put the year on the cover? It didn't take long to discover that my assumption was ill-founded.
There are places in Spain where over 50% of the accomadations listed are no longer in operation. Imagine walking up to the address they give and finding a condemned building, finding an empty lot, or finding a shop that has been there for a few years. Now imagine this happening to you 5 times in a row before you find a place.
Imagine yourself arriving in Bratislava and hitting up the tourist office for directions to the YMCA hostel. Smile when the agent there laughs and says they tore that place down 3 years ago, but that she always has people asking for directions there (hmmm... I wonder why that could be?). Imagine looking up a copy of Let's Go and seeing that they no longer list the YMCA in Bratislava as a place for accomadation.
Imagine reading a glowing review about a cathedral, only to go to that cathedral and find out that the blurb on the back of the admittance ticket is an almost word-for-word copy of the text in Lonely Planet (or is it the other way around?).
Imagine how helpful it is to read a book where most of the authors (especially the one who covered Spain) are unable to say a bad thing about anywhere. Arrive in a town that reads better than it looks, and imagine you are somewhere else.
Those are some of the bigger problems with this book. For the most part, it is just really out of date and it shows. The prices in Let's go are more accurate, but even they will always be a little off because of inflation. Some of the prices in Lonely Planet were off by an astounding 250% (yes, 250%), however, which is due to the fact that it has been a number of years since that section was updated. Given that this book is not updated very regularly, and that Lonely planet must make a killing off of these books, there are also a lot of errors that have remained in successive printings and which I find unacceptable. For example, in the 4 or so pages they devote to Trujillo, Merida, and Cacares (3 towns in Spain), they quote 3 different prices for transportation between these towns. Or take a look at their "top 10/bottom 10" list in the introduction: they seem unsure just where St. Petersberg is, as they list it as being in both Scandanavia and in Eastern Europe. That is just sloppy, but I think it reflects how much care has been put into the book.
What really annoys me is that Lonely Planet seems to rely on its readers to be its fact-checkers, its contributors, and its editors. If you do send in a correction, you have a chance to win a free copy of their over-priced book, a good percentage of which was written by peaople like you. Yippee! Sometimes I think that some of the non-existent accomadation information I encountered was sent in disgruntled readers as a form of retribution (Lonely Planet admits on their website that they haven't stayed at all the places they 'recommend'). Sometimes I think of doing the same.
I personally get the impression that their reviewers have stayed at something less than 50% of the places. I also suspect that they haven't even visited many of the sights they recommend (at some hostels the staff will make jokes about this). As I mentioned earlier, some of the reviews seem to have been taken directly from promotional material. And if you have any knowledge of the sights reviewed, you will often find the reviews to be incorrect or misleading.
I was also interested to note that, on their website, Lonely Planet informs us that their reviewers (those that they actually do hire) are free to tell various hotels, hostels, pensions, restaurants, etc., that they are working for Lonely Planet and will be reviewing their establishments. Perhaps that explains why many of these places allegedly feature friendly staff, free internet, free maps, free coffee, clean rooms, winter heating, etc., but the bonuses never quite materialize when you stay there.
For what it's worth, I spent 9 months traveling around with this book, and that may have contributed to my disapointment. If you aren't going to spend so much time on your vacation you probably won't go the smaller places where a guidebook is more important, and its mistakes more evident.
Ice_One_Guys
Of all the continental single-volume books that Lonely Planet has produced, this is the best. This book is a valuable all-in-one guide that any visitor touring Europe can depend on. Some forty countries (including Morocco and Turkey) were discussed in detail. Well-illustrated maps and superb index are among its strongest qualities. But note that the single European currency, Euro, came into circulation a year after the publication of this Second Edition. As a result, all the prices in the E.U. zone are listed in the outdated pre-Euro currencies of individual nations. Another weak point is this: instead of including Russia, (as a full country), Lonely Planet decided to pick only the Saint Petersburg city.
Naa
Lonely Planet is a great guidebook series, but their true worth shines only in their individual country guides, not in this massive tome. Sure it's got all of Europe in here, but Europe is a BIG place. If you only mean to go to major cities, this will be a great book to have, and the maps are well worth it. Spend 5 minutes off the beaten track and you'll need to do something else. I know where every English language bookstore is in every city in Europe now. I would find them and do additional reseach.
The basic problem with this book is that editorial concerns triumphed over real meaty information. I ended up buying :P Hungary for my time in that wonderful country, because this book skimped on any real information outside Budapest.
Trust me, if you're going rural than getting the individual guides is well worth it.
Europe on a Shoestring (Lonely Planet Europe on a Shoestring) download epub
Europe
Author: Scott McNeely,et al
ISBN: 1864501502
Category: Travel
Subcategory: Europe
Language: English
Publisher: Lonely Planet Publications; 2nd edition (January 1, 2001)
Pages: 1296 pages